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AN IDG 
COM MUNIC AUDI 
PUBLICATION 
August 1991 



Apple II / Macintosh 





EAT MY DUST Mac... 



Hyperspeed for $149 



If You Use... 

• Appleworks GS 
•Managing your 
Money 

•PrintshopGS 
•HyperCardGS 
•Springboard 
Publisher 
•DeluxePaint 
•Quicken •Publish it 3, 
or any other GS software - -Then 
you need a Zip GS. 

Here's Why... 

To use powerful programs you need a pow- 
erful computer, Apple Computer left one thing 
out of the IIGS when they designed it..speed. 
The Zip GS puts the speed back in. The Zip 
GS comes standard with 8 K cache memory 
and runs at a very speedy 7 Mhz. The Zip GS 
gives you all the speed you need now and in 
the future because ifs expandable. You will 
never have to buy another accelerator card 
again. All upgrades are available now. 

Can you imagine the time you will save 
having your GS running up to 10 Megahertz 
fester. Appleworks performs like you always 
thought it should, recalculations in the blink of 
an eye. Word processing faster than on me 
new line of Macintosh computers. Nibble 
magazine said it this way "Apple Computer 
take note: this chip makes a full featured GS 
word processor faster than several Macintosh 
word processors running on a monochrome 
display." (monochrome display is the 
fastest) Hallelujah! ZIP GS DELIVERS! 




BS+ Magaiine 



ZIPGS 

•Is very easy to operate. 
• Needs no special boot-up. • 
Provides Macintosh speeds for your GS* Is 
compatible with all GS hardware and software. • 
Uses 1/10 the power of competing boards. • 
Address all memory. • Upgradable to 64 K 
cache memory.* 16 variable speeds at the touch 
of a key. • 30 day money back guarantee and a 
1 year warranty. • Upgradable to 10 
megahertz. • Fully DMA compatible. 

Installation 

Anyone can install the Zip GS in a matter of 
minutes. To help with the installation, we 
include an animated pictorial instruction 
manual which gives detailed instructions on 
installation and operation. 



The Zip GS can be upgraded at any time. 
Zip Technology has available upgrade kits that 
boost the speed to lOMhz.! We will be happy 
to do the upgrade labor for free within 48 
hours. 



J £ C H N O L O G Y 



Reliable 

The Zip GS has only one custom inte- 
grated circuit The other three compon- 
ents on the Zip GS are the same reliable 
components from the same manufac- 
turers found in your GS Computer. 

Low Power 

The Zip GS requires only 120 ma of power - 
lOtimes less than other accelerators. The low 
power means it will always run cool. 

Amiable 

The Zip GS has been available and shipping 
for over four months. In the short time that it 
has been available, we have delivered thou- 
sands to satisfied customers around the world. 

Special Introductory Otter 

The Zip GS is priced at $199.00 retail. 
During ths introductory offer the Zip GS is only 
$149.00, a savings of $50.00. 

IIP SS Introductory Oiler $149,85 

8Mhz upgrade add only $29.95 

9Mhz upgrade add only $59.95 

8K cache upgrade add only $19.95 

32K cache upgrade add only $49.95 

Zip GS -10 Ultra Fast 10 Mhz call 

Risk Free Offer /Money Back Guarantee 

If you are not satisfied with the perfor- 
mance of your GS Plus, simply return it in the 
original box within 30 days for a refund. 

Order Today Call Toff Free: 

1 800937-9737 

Checks, VISA, Mastercard, American Express and Discovery 
cards accepted. 

Now Shipping 
Standard Air By 



5601 West Slauson Avenue, Suite #190 • Culver City, CA90230 • Phone: (213) 337-1313 • FAX: (213) 337-9337 

. „ All product names are trademarks of their manuikturers 

Circle 1 89 on Reader Service Card. 



Is YbuR Apple II Already Obsolete? 

NO, YOU JUST NEED THE NEW GENERATION OF SOFTWARE! 




Feature for feature your Apple II is still one of the best computers 
ever for home use and the Apple IIgs® is probably THE best computer 
for home and school ever produced. With a new generation of 
software your Apple II will carry you well into the 90's; and 
SOFTDISK PUBLISHING™ is actively developing software for 
both the Apple II and Apple IIgs; That's why our 
software subscriptions can be so valuable to you. 

WHAT IS SOFTDISK™ FOR THE APPLE II 

(e, c, c+, +,gs)? 

SOFTDISK is a monthly software 
collection designed for the Apple II. 
Every month we send you two 5V" 
disks or one 800K disk packed with 
original new programs for your 
Apple II. What kind of software? 
Practically anything you can do 
with an Apple II computer. Af- 
ter 120 issues of SOFTDISK, 
our editors really know how to pro- 
vide you with Apple Q software you can use. 

WHAT IS SOFTDISK G-S FOR THE APPLE IIgs? 

SOFTDISK G-S is a monthly software collection designed for the 
Apple Hos. SOFTDISK G-S is true 16-bit and takes advantage of 
the special sound and graphics capabilities that only the Apple IIgs 
supports. Plus, your Apple IIgs is able to run both SOFTDISK and 
SOFTDISK G-S. And since they have different programs, get both 
at a special combo price! 

QUALITY ORIGINAL SOFTWARE 

Don't confuse SOFTDISK and SOFTDISK G-S with shareware or 
public domain software. Our low price is made possible by our large 
circulation, not by inferior programs. There are no extra fees to pay 
for your software or FREE TECHNICAL SUPPORT. The pro- 
grams on SOFTDISK and SOFTDISK G-S are developed by the 
world's best program designers. 



CONTENTS OF SOFTDISK #114* 

MOVIE MINDER- Applsworks® database to organize your videotape library. 

MONTHLY MYSTERY II- Very fishy program. A neat screen saver. 

CATACOMBS- A four-way scrolling double hi-res game. 

MALT- A label utility to print labels for your disks, videotapes, etc. 

PS GRAPHICS- More PRINT SHOPgraphics from our staff. 

PLUS- Professor Know-ft-all, Readers Write, Gaming Forum. 



CONTENTS OF SOFTDISK G-S #13* 

REFLEXION - A puzzle game with clean graphics and fun sounds. 
PS VIEWER-IMAGES- Features school images and some cool aliens. 
HACK ATTACK LEVEL SET- New levels for Arkanoid™ game. 
JUKEBOX - Three incredible new songs. Sit back and listen. 
SPORTS CLIP ART - Two pages of detailed sports figure clip art. 
FRESHSCRIPT FONT- A great GS font in four point sizes. 
SPENCER'S PAGES- A sensational page layout template,"Lantern Light". 
G-ESSENCE- A column about the current state of the Apple world. 



A PRICE YOU'LL APPRECIATE 

SOFTDISK for your Apple II can be delivered to your home monthly, 
postagepaid,for$6.65amonmor$19.95forU)j^montlis.SOFTDISK 
G-S for your IIgs is only $9.97 a month or $29.95 for three months. If 
you're a IIgs owner, we'll offer you a special combo price of $39.95 for 
three months. Satisfaction guaranteed! 

HERE'S WHAT THE EXPERTS ARE 
WRITING ABOUT SOFTDISK AND 
SOFTDISK G-S: 

"In a world where real bargains are hard to 
find, SOFTDISK is a very pleasant surprise.." 

— Electronic Learning 

" Programs, desk accessories, fonts, games, . 
. . , SOFTDISK G-S is a great value'* 

— InCider A+ 

"...this is a full-blown software package with 
beautiful graphics and an extensive help session 
. . . if s an economical way to add interesting 
software to your library." 

—Apple IIgs Buyer's Guide 

WE HAVE HUNDREDS OF LETTERS LIKE THIS: 

"Dear Softdisk: Your Softdisk G-S is great! I am very impressed, the moving 
icons, interesting columns, matter-of-fact reviews, up to date system software, 
spiffy user interface, etc. I will definitely renew when the time comes" 

So there you have it. Original software, outstanding quality, and all at 
a price you can easily afford. Would you subscribe to a disk packed 
with programs, postage free? If you're not sure, why not take advan- 
tage of this special offer and try just 3 issues - no risk - no obligation 
tocontinue. As abonus, we will also send you FREE— 200 Print Shop® 
graphics. If you're not completely satisfied, we'll refund yourmoney. 
No questions asked. 



^1-800-831-2694 



FREE 



€ OR FAX THIS COUPON TO . 
k 318-221-8870 monthly software 
r YES! Rush my FREE bonus, 200 Print Shop Graphics, and 
start mv three-month trial subscriotion to Softdisk G-S and/or 



SOFTDISK 
PUBLISHING 



■ 
■ 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
■ 
I 
■ 
I 
■ 



start my three-month trial subscription to Softdisk G-S and/or 
Softdisk, postage paid. Make check or money order payable to Softdisk 
Publishing in U.S. funds (LA residents, add 4% state sales tax). 
Check one: 

□ Softdisk (For the Apple IIgs) $29.9* CaniMex. $34.95, Other For. $37.95 

□ Softdisk (Forthe Apple II) $19.95 Can/Mex, $24.95, Other For. $27.95 

□ Combo-SofWIsk G-S & Softdisk $39.95; CanTMex. $49.95, Other For. $55.95 

Check Disk Format: □ Two 5.25" disks □ One 3,5" disk 

Name 

Address 

City 



Phone # 

□ Discover QVisa/MC QAmEx 
Card# 



.State. 



.Zip + 4 . 



Signature. 



□ Payment Enclosed (U.S. funds only). 
Exp. Date 



SOFTDISK PUBLISHING • P.O. Box 30008 * Shreveport, LA 71130-0008 

318-221-8718 ♦1-806-831-2694 W081 



I 

■i 
■l 
II 

t 
V 

■i 

■I 
If 

■i 



'Available as a back issue. 



SeMtt G-S: 768K-One 3.5' drive Required; 1.25 Meg. Two 5.25* drives Recommended. SofWtek: 64K Required; 128K Recommended. 
Softdisk and Softdisk G-S are trademarks of Softdisk Publishing, Inc. Macintosh, Apple If, Apple ISss and AppleWorks are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 
Print Snap is a registered trademark of Broderbund Software. Artcanoid is a trademark of Tafto, 



Circle 291 on Reader Service Card. 



QUALITY COMPUTERS roSm 



Welcome ! 



gives you 

iNHANCI 



Enhance is Quality Computers bi- 
monthly inf ormati ve-tec h nical-ente r- 
taining newsletter. Enhanceg'w/esyou 
the kind of information you need to 
make your Apple the effective work/ 
educational tool it was designed to 
be, like product reviews and com- 
parisons, new product announce- 
ments, news, and two special sec- 
tions, Enhancing Education — writ- 
ten by teachers for teachers, and 
Computer Club Corner — designed 
to spark interest in User Groups 
across the country. 

Enhancealso includes our catalog — 
full of all the hardware and software 
you need for your Apple II. Quality 
Computers catalog includes detailed 
product descriptions and MONEY- 
SAVING COUPONS. 

Quality Computers has been publish- 
ing £/7/jaweforover4 years. It's free 
to all QC customers, or you can call 
for your free subscription today! 

" . . an excellent publication." 

Wanda Bullion 
SJAUG User Group, Cherry Hill NJ 

7 enjoy reading the articles and al- 
ways learn something new." 

Charles S, Saunders 
Skokie, IL 



Get your FREE subscription 

TODAY! 
1-800-443-6697 



1 -800-443-6697 



Welcome! 



HARD DRIVES 

QUALITY COMPUTERS (w/Apple SCSI) 

40 MEG. (Conner Drive) 549.95 

1 00 MEG. (Conner Drive) 749.95 

200 MEG. 1,295.95 

45 MEG. Removable 699.95 

Tape Backup Call 

CD ROM Call 

He Drive Call 
APPLIED ENGINEERING 

20MEG.Vulcanj(lle,IIGS) 519.95 

40 MEG. Vulcan (lie, IIGS) 649.95 

100 MEG. Vulcan (He. HGS) 1,285.95 

SCSI INTERFACE CARDS 

Apple High-Speed 109.95 

RamFAST/SCSI (w/256K RAM) 1 79.95 

MEMORY CARDS 

AERAMWOflKSIH 

256K 139.95 

51 2K 159.95 

1 MEG. 199.95 

RGB CoiprLink Option 99.95 
AE RAMF ACTOR 

256K 169.95 

51 2K 189.95 

1 MEG. 229.95 
AE Z-RAM ULTRA II 

256K 189.95 

51 2K 209.95 

1 MEG. 249.95 
AE RAM EXPRESS II 

256K 149.95 

51 2K 169.95 

1 MEG. 209.95 
AE GS-RAM PIUS or ULTRA 

1 MEG. 199.95 

2 MEG. 259.95 

3 MEG. 319.95 
AE GS-RAM III 

1 MEG. 159.95 

2 MEG. 219.95 

4 MEG. 339.95 
CHINOOK 4000 6S 

1 MEG. 149.95 

2 MEG. 209.95 
4 MEG. 329.95 



CV TECH. GS MEMORY BOARD 

1 MEG. 

2 MEG. 

3 MEG. 

4 MEG. 

MEMORY CHIPS 

256K (bank) 
256Kx4(setof2) 
1 MEG. (bank) 

1 MEG. SIMMS 

2 MEG. SIMMS 
4 MEG. SIMMS 
Mac Classic Modules 
Zipps 

DISK DRIVES 

AE3.5 - 

AE 3.5" High-Density 
AE5.25- 

AMR 1.4 MEG. 3.5' 
AMR 5^5- Daisy chainable 
Laser 3.5* 
Laser 5.25" 
Laser UDC 
Apple 3.5' (He, Ik) 
Apple 3.5" (He Plus, IIGS) 
Apple Controller 
Apple Unidisk Controller 

PRINTERS 

ImageWriter It 

Hewlett-Packard DeskJet 500 
Panasonic 1180 
Panasonic 1191 
Panasonic 11 24i 



149.95 
209.95 
269.95 
329.95 



19.95 
19.95 
69.95 
59.95 
Call 
Call 
Call 
79.95 



199.95 
239.95 
129.95 
199.95 
129.95 
149.95 
99.95 
49:95 
309.95 
319.95 
49.95 
59.95 



459.95 
579.95 
199.95 
249.95 
349.95 




MEMORY CHIPS 



256K 
256Kx4 
1 MEG. 

1 MEG. SIMMS 

2 MEG. SIMMS 
4 MEG. SIMMS 
Mac Classic 
Zipps 



$19.95/bank 
19.95/set of 2 
69.95/bank 
59.95 
Call 
Call 
Call 
79.95/bank 



PRINTER INTERFACE CARDS 

AE Parallel Pro 79.95 

AE Serial Pro 109.95 

Fingerprint GSi 89.95 

Fingerprint Plus 89.95 

Fingerprint G+ or SS w/cable 59.95 

Grappler 9 Pin 84.95 

Grappler Plus 79.95 

SRECWJSuperWriter924 64.95 

SreGHl/SMTPrintech 29.95 



ATTENTION 
PRICE" 



• We 'II match any nationally 
advertised price! 

• We have it in stock! 

• Our service can 't be beat! 

• You get it tomorrow! 

PRICE MATCH POLICY AT MANAGER'S 
DISCRETION 











1 






Let us put together an Apple 
HGS system to fit your 
needs. Our knowledgeable 
sales staff can recommend 
a system designed for... 

• the beginner 

• extra storage 
•extra speed 
• the works! 

...AT PRICES YOU CAN 
LIVE WITH! 



Circle 136 an Reader Service Card. 



Quality Computers 



POWER FOR PERFORMANCE 



YOUR COMPLETE APPLE SOURCE 

Quality Computers is one of the largest Apple mail order companies in the country. Why? We offer 
more: a staff of Apple sales experts; a complete product line; user-friendly Customer Service; the 
best Technical Support in the business; Q Labs, our own software development division; our own 
newsletter, Enhance;ar\(l special programs, like the Teacher Bonus Program. No other company 
offers all this at prices you can live with. 



QUALITY COMPUTERS night! 



School F»-0-s 
Welcome ! 



1 -800-443-6697 



School F^.O-S 
Welcome I 




HYPERMEDIA 

Your Apple tl 
can become a 
hypermedia 
machine! 
Integrate text, 
sound, and 
graphics to 
create an interactive tutorial, 
computerized slide show, and more! 

HYPERSTUDIO — Apple ilGS 
Requires 1.25 MEG $82.95 

HYPERCARD ilGS 

Requires 1.5 MEG $79.95 

TUTOR-TECH — Apple Me, lie, IlGS 
Requires 128K $149.95 



SUPRA BUNDLE SPECIAL! 

Telecommunications is HOT! Find 
out why. Get the QC Supra Bundle. 
St includes the Hayes-compatible 
SupraModem 2400, cable, and TIC 
software. Suggested retail price 
$230 — you save $95! 



$134.95 





APPLE lie ENHANCEMENTS 

Give your He improved capabilities 
with enhancement products from 
Apple: 

AppleMouse $119.95 

Enhancement Kit 59.95 

3.5 Untdisk (not shown) 309.95 
Unidisk Controller 59.95 



MODEMS 

SupraModem 2400 99.95 

SupraModem Plus W/MNP5 179.95 
SPECIAL! SUPRA BUNDLE 

SupraModem 2400, Cable, and TIC 1 34.95 

AE DataLink 2400 (Internal) 1 59.95 

AE DataLink Express 1 79.95 

AE DataLink Express W/MNP5 219.95 
AE DataLink Exp. (MNP5/Send-FAX) GS 219.95 

MONITORS 

1 2° Amber or Green Monochrome 99.95 

Magnavox RGB 299.95 

Custom Cable (GS) 19.95 

Apple RGB 459.95 

INPUT DEVICES 

AppleMouse lie 119.95 

A+ IlGS Mouse 79.95 

Laser Mouse (WORKS ON lie!) 49.95 

Kensington Turbo Mouse 109.95 

CH Mach III Joystick 29.95 

CHMacn IV Plus Joystick 62.95 

CH nightstick 47.95 

IBM-Compatible Keyboard 79.95 

IIGS/Mac ADB Keyboard 129.95 

SOUND & GRAPHICS HARDWARE 

Quickie (lie, IlGS) 199.95 

LightningScan GS 199.95 

ComputerEyes lie 99.95 

ComputerEyes IlGS 195.95 

Apple Video Overlay Card 429.95 

AE Sonic Blaster 98.95 

AE Audio Animator 179.95 

Echo II 109.95 

COMPUTERS 

Apple IlGS CPU (wfl MEG. RAM) 799.95 

Laser 128EX 387.95 

Laser 1 28 Color System 51 0.95 

ACCESSORIES 

AE TransWarp GS 229.95 

AE TransWarp GS W/32K cache 31 9.95 

AE TransWarp GS Upgrade 32.95 

AE Conserver 77.95 

AE Power Supply 79.95 

AE Power Supply IlGS 89.95 

AE TimeMaster 78.95 

Apple lie Enahancement Kit 59.95 

Cables (most) 14.95 

Extended 80 Column Card (lie) 24.95 

Kensington System Saver lie 59.95 

Kensington System Saver GS 69.95 

Numeric Keypad lie 34.95 

HEW! QG POWER SUPPLY tta 59.95 

SMT No Slot Clock 29.95 
Switchboxes from 24.95 

Zip GSX 1600 179.95 

LASERDISC SOFTWARE 

The Presenter 53.95 

National Gallery of Art 94.95 

Great Quake of '89 44.95 

Tha National Zoo 29.95 

HYPERMEDIA 

HyperStudio GS 82.95 

Lab Pack 449.95 

MEW! HyperCard IlGS' 79.95 

Tutor-Tech (lie, lie, HGS) 1 49.95 



ASK ABOUT OUR 
TEACHER BONUS POINT 
PROGRAM! 




BUSINESS SOFTWARE 

AppleWorks 3.0 169.95 

10 Pack (3.5' or 5.25°) 949.95 
Appleshare Network Version 1 ,089.95 

AppleWorks GS 199.95 
10 Pack 1,139.95 

AppleWorks 3.0 Companion 24.95 

BeagleWrite 48.95 

BeagleWriteGS 59.95 

BusinessWorks Bundle 249.95 

BusinessWorks Payroll 99.95 

BusinessWorks System Manager 79.95 

DB Master Pro 189.95 

«W/lnWords(OCR) 79.95 

Managing Your Money 5.0 99.95 

Quicken 38.95 

ReportCard II 42.95 

Sensible Grammar 52.95 

. Sensible Speller 79.95 

WordPerfect lie or IlGS 104,95 

COMMUNICATION SOFTWARE 

Point to Point 59.95 

ProTERM v.2.2 79.95 

ProTERM School Pack 279.95 

AE ReadyLink 59.95 

TIC 39.95 

EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE 

Ask about School Editions, 
Lab Packs and Site Licenses. 

ORANGE CHERRY — TALKING SHODLHOUSE 

Talking ABC's GS 38.95 

Talking Addition & Subtraction GS 38.95 

Talking Animals Activity Set GS 38.95 

Talking Classroom GS 38.95 

Talking USA Map GS 38.95 

THE LEARNING COMPANY 

Reader Rabbit or Math Rabbit 24.95 

Talking Reader Rabbit GS 34.95 
Children's Writing & Publishing Center 34.95 

Think Quick 34.95 

BR0DERGUND 

Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego? 25.95 

Macintosh Version 29.95 
Carmen USA, Europe/Time, or World GS 29.95 

Macintosh Version 29.95 

The Playroom 24.95 

Macintosh Version 29.95 

The New Print Shop 29.95 

Katie's Farm or McGee 24.95 

Macintosh Version 27.95 

mil McGee at the Fun Fair 24.95 

Macintosh Version 27.95 

Geometry GS 54.95 

Kid Pix 29.95 

Science ToolKit - Master Module 54.95 

Science ToolKit - Modules 1 , or 2 27.95 

WEEKLY READER 

Sticky Bear Numbers, ABC's, 

Opposites, or Shapes 24.95 

Talking Sticky Bear ABC's, 

Opposites, or Shapes 29.95 

MECC 

Calendar CrafterGS 32.95 
Fraction Munchers or Number Munchers 24.95 

Oregon Trail 24.95 

USA GeoGraph GS 54.95 

Word Munchers 24.95 

World GeoGraph GS 54.95 




INWOROS WESTCODE 
With InWords and a hand-held 
scanner, you can scan virtually any 
printed information — just as if you 
typed it from the keyboard — only 
faster. Enters up to 500 words/ 
minute. Req. Apple IlGS or enhanced 
lie w/512K ; and Quickie or 
compatible scanner. $79.95 




TALKING TOOLS byteworks 
Mow your IlGS can talk back with 
the new Talking Tools program. 
Desktop program will read words 
or documents in male or female 
voice. Also includes interfaces for 
Orca programmers to add speech 
to their programs, $39.95 




ORCA/C BUNDLE byteworks 
Learn to program with the Orca/C 
compiler and the Learn to Program 
Tutorial. Includes complete C 
libraries, extension for IlGS Tool 
Box and built-in debugger. Easy 
and fun! 

Orca/C $79.95 
Learn to Program 119.95 



Circle 136 on Reader Service Card. 



POWER FOR PERFORMANCE 



POLICY 

• We ship via Airborne Express, UPS, DHL, and US Mail. Saturday deliveries available. If 
order is split, we pay freight on balance of items. Add $3.95 for C.O.D. certified. 

• RETURNS: All defective or mis-shipped items may be returned within 30 days for 
replacement Items returned with damaged or incomplete packaging will be charged 
packaging fees. No refunds on software items (unless otherwise specified). Ask about 
our Rental Program! 

• Prices subject to change without notice. 

• We accept school P.O.'s by mail, phone or FAX (313) 774-2698. 



1 



HARD DRIVE • APPLE II • MAC 




SIMPLY 





As the Apple hard drive 
leader, we've sold and ser- 
viced every hard drive on 
themarket.We'veshipped 
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them come back - in 
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Finally, those days are over. We are 
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buffering for quick data access. 

THE BEST COMPATIBILITY. We 

demanded SCSI compatibmry. With 
SCSI you get complete compatibility 
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on request. 

THE BEST DOCUMENTATION. 

The Q Drive's plain-English manual 
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but also hard drive basics, ProDOS, 
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the Finder, backups, maintenance, 
and troubleshooting. There's even a 
glossary of hard drive terminology. 



EASIEST TO USE. The Q Drive's 
software makes setting up a breeze. It 
instantly determines which Apple if s 
nmnmgonandconfigurestheQDrive 
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MEG of the best public domain soft- 
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THE BEST SERVICE AND SUP- 
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hour average service time, and com- 
plete data recovery in most cases. 

THE BEST PRICE. We priced the Q 
Drive to make it one of the most af- 
fordable hard drives available. Hard- 
ware, software, support, and price 
make the Q Drive the best Apple hard 
drive value. Take one for a test drive 
today! 



Undecided about 
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Buyer's Guide. It 
has everything 
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BiWs Guide 




TOP 10 REASONS WHY THE 
Q DRIVE IS YOUR BEST CHOICE 

1 . Comes complete with the Apple High 
Speed SGSI Card or RamFAST/SCSI 
Card {add $70). 

2. Comes with free 15 MEG library of 
great public domain software. 

3. Comes with the latest system soft- 
ware: GS/OS, ProDOS 8, the Finder, 
and a Mini-Selector 

4. Instantly recognizes your computer 
(Apple He or IIGS) and automatically 
configures itself. 

5. Comes with the most complete docu- 
mentation in the industry. Not only 
will you learn how to operate your Q 
Drive, you'll learn how it and other 
hard drives work. 

6. 1 00% SCSI compatible so it works on 
any Apple lie, IIGS or Macintosh. 

7. Backed by the fastest, most compre- 
hensive service plan in the industry. 

8. Hassle-lree 30-day money back guar- 
antee, and a 1-year limited warranty. 

9. The best internal mechanism. 

1 0. Attractive, compact case compliments 
your system, whether it sits under 
your monitor, on its side, or anywhere 
you want it. 9-3/4' x 10" x 2-1/2' 

TheQ Drive isfantastic! Super-fast, quiet, 
formats itself, and a super 15 MEG soft- 
ware base — what a bonus! 

Howard J. Dillon 
Las Vegas, NV 

'. . . the Q Drive software is so easy to use 
that it practically sets up the drive itself." 

inCider Magazine 



No other drive gives 
you all this at such a 
low price. 

Don't settle for less! 

40 MEG $549.95 

100 MEG 749.95 

200 MEG. .1,295.95 

ALSO AVAILABLE! 

• 45 MEG Removable 

• Tape Backup 

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DESIGN 

ART DIRECTOR John Sizing 

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4 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



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QUALITY COMPUTERS night. 



School F>.0-s 
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CROSSWORKS softspoken 
Copies and converts files either 
way between Apple II and IBM, and 
translates the formats. Exchanges 
AppleWorks files with Microsoft 
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dBase and other popular MS-DOS 
programs via universal cable 
(included) or modem. $69.95 




PLATINUM PAINT beagle bros. 
Platinum Paint's graphic editing 
features are easy-to-use and 
incredibly fast. Compose paintings, 
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clip art, colorize scanned images, 
and more! Whatever your graphic 
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Platinum Paint. $59.95 



SALVATION SUPREME vitesse 

The total hard-drive volume utility 
for the Apple I1GS. Includes a 
backup utility, a virus detector and 
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1 -800-443-6697 



DAVIDSON 

AlgeBlaster Plus 29.95 

Grammar Gremlins 29.95 

MathBlaster Plus 29.95 

MathBlaster Mystery 29.95 

Read & Roll 34.95 

Spell It Plus . 32.95 

Word Attack Plus 32.95 
OTHER TITLES 

Crossword Magic 34.95 

Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing 27.95 

Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing GS 33.95 

Evelyn Wood Dynamic Reader 24.95 

Creation 29.95 

ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE 

Bard's Tale II GS 18.95 

Battle Chess GS 32.95 

The Cryllan Mission 44.95 

Crystal Quest 32.95 

The Duel: Test Drive II 32.95 

Grand Prix Circuit 28.95 

Hunt for Red October 22.95 

Jack Nicklaus Golf 32.95 

Tetris 27.95 

Tunnels of Armageddon 29.95 

Xenocide 32.95 

SOUND & GRAPHICS SOFTWARE 

3/16 Paint (lie, lie, IIGS) 49.95 

Award Maker Plus 29.95 

Banner-mania 24.95 

Design Your Own Home GS 59.95 

Font Factory GS 25.95 

GraphlcWrlter III 74.95 

GS Font Editor 29.95 

Labels, Labels, Labels (5.25) 24.95 

Platinum Paint 59.95 

PrintShop NEW! (3.5 or 5.25) 29.95 

PrintShop GS 36.95 

PrintShop GS Companion 29.95 
PS Graphics Libraries each 1 6.95 
PS Graphics Libraries GS each 24.95 

PS Lover's Utility Set (lie or IIGS) 27.95 

«Eir/Publi$hlt!4 89.95 

VCR Companion 34.95 



TIMEOUT SERIES — BEAGLE 

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DeskTools, FileMaster, PowerPack, 

SideSpread, TextTools, or Thesaurus 32.95 
QuickSpeil, SpreadTools, or UltraMacros 40.95 

SuperFonts, SuperForms or Telecomm 42.95 

Outliner 42.95 

ReportWriter 48.95 

Graph 52.95 

UTILITIES & LANGUAGES 

Amazing Window Grade Sheet 39.95 

Bag of Tricks 28.95 

Copy II Plus 9.0 25.95 

CrossWorks 69.95 

GS Desk Accessories 34.95 

JHEWf Harmon ie 2.0 29.95 

Independence 24.95 

Micol Advanced BASIC lie 59.95 

Micol Advanced BASIC IIGS 89.95 

Orca/DesignMaster 39.95 

Orca/PASCAL, Orca/M or Orca/C 79.95 

Orca Learn to Program 1 1 9.95 
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RepairWorks or SuperPatch 34.95 ' 

RAMUP,EasyDrive,orTIC 39.95 
Ruth Witkin's Best New AW Templates 24.95 
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Exorciser, Deliverance, or Bakkup 29.95 

Renaissance 34.95 

Wings 49.95 

AfflHtt/ Supreme (All 5 modules) 99.95 

SuperConvert 19.95 

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIAL 

1 ,001 Things to do w/Apple IIGS 12,95 

The Hard Drive Buyer's Guide 6,00 

Hands-On AppleWorks 3-Pack 1 8.95 

Teacher Set 29.95 

Lab Pack 239.95 

Using AppleWorks GS 15.95 

AppleWorks Made Easy 1 5.95 

The Official Print Shop Handbook 1 5.95 
Beneath Apple DOS or ProDOS ea. 1 4.95 



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REPAIRWORKS/SUPERPATCH 

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SALES: 1-800-966-1508 or 1-800-443-6697 Mon.-Fri. 9AM-8PM Sat. 10AM-4PM (Eastern Time) 
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CUSTOMER SERVICE: (313) 774-7200 Mon.-Fri. 9AM-5PM (Eastern Time) 

20200 E. Nine Mile Road • Box 665 • St. Clair Shores, Ml 48080 
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OPERATION APP LE STORM 



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APPLIED ENGINEERING 

3.5 Disk Drive (E,C+,GS) 194 

Audio Animator (GS) 174 

Conserver (GS) 74 

DataIM2400(Mernal) 159 

DL Express 2400, MNP/5 189 

GS-RAM 11,1 Meg |pp 126 

GS-RAM Plus, 1 Meg 194 

GS-RAM Ultra, 1 Meg 194 

PC Transporter (E,GS) 257 

Power Supply (GS) 89 

Power Supply (U+,//e) 74 

RamWorksm,lMeg 194 

TranswarpGS (7 MHZ) 247 

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37 
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59 
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Vulcan 40 Meg <E or GS) 599 



AMR 

3.5 Disk Controller Card (E) 49 

800K3.5 Drive 179 

52Q MB Mini HD PP 539 

100Q MB Mini HD PP^ 799 

210Q MB Mini HD 1199 



APPLE 

GS/OSv5.0.4 
HyperCard GS 



39 
84 




OPERATION APPLESTORM 

Strategy: 
To beat the best advertised 
price in this magazine or 
Ragin' Roger will send you 
a check for $5 U.S.* 



CENTRAL POINT 

Copy 11 Plus v9.1 27 

CH PRODUCTS 
CHFlightStick 47 
CHMach 111 Joystick 31 

CLARIS 

AppleworksGSvl.1 199 
Appleworks3.0 169 

CMS 

40MBExtHDw/oSCSI 399 
81MBExtHDw/oSCSI 489 

CV TECHNOLOGY 
GS Memory Board, 1 Meg 149 
RamFASTSCSI 
Controller (E-GS) 177 

GLEN BREDON 

ProSel 16 w/manual 74 



1,000's of products available! 
Fill out the Reader Service Card 
for a FREE Catalog 



LASER 

Laser 128 Color System 499 
Laser 128 EX/2 Computer (3.5) 435 
Laser 190A Printer 189 

PYGRAPHICS 

Music Writer (Level 2, E or GS) 199 



ROGER WAGNER 
HyperStudio 

SENSIBLE 
Sensible Grammar 

SEVEN HILLS 
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SUPRA 
2400 Modem 
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81 



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99 
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Quickie Scanner (E, GS) 195 
Salvation Supreme |pp^ 
(If you own a hard drive, you need 
this utility. What a Savings!) 99 



WESTCODE 
InWords (OCR Software) 



79 



ZIP 

GSX(8MHZ/16KCache) 199 

GSX+ (9 MHZ/32K Cache) 249 

Zip Chip 8 MHZ (//e,c) 149 

MACINTOSH PRODUCTS 

AMR 1.4 MB 3.5 Drive 179 

AMR 100Q MB MINI HD 709 

AMR210Q MB MINI HD 1109 
Central Point MacTools Deluxe 84 

CH Roller Mouse ABD 79 

Claris CAD v 2.0 629 

Claris FileMaker Pro 209 

Claris MacDraw II 279 

CMS 40 MB Ext HD 399 

CMS 81 MB Ext HD 489 
Freesoft 

White Knight (Telecom) 89 

Supra 2400 MacPack Modem 159 

Supra 2400 Plus MacPak 219 



^ Call WEEKLY/or the General's Latest Specials! &&&& 



HOW TO ORDER; 

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FAX: 1-619-274-2440 

15°o ($15 min. restocking fee on 
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OUR FINE PRINT: 
'Certain limitations apply to $5 offer: 
1. Advertised price must be published in this magazine. 

2. We reserve the right to question misprints. 
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We accept the following methods of pa , n-ent: 
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w3r| 



inCider 




Apple II /Macintosh 



AUGUST 



1991 Vol. 9 No. 8 




The Electronic Palette 

Let your visual imagination run wild — a good paint package and a graphics- smart 
computer like the Apple IIgs or the Macintosh LC can put the fun back into 
creating. With pixels as your medium and the mouse as your tool, Mac and GS 
programs help you discover the artist within. 



Command Performance 

Listen to what music lovers are doing with Apple lies, IlGSes, and Macs as their 
instruments. Want to sing like a Baptist choir, swing from country t© rock as quick as the 
Kentucky Headhunters, or soar in symphonic power like the Boston Pops? For teaching, 
performance, and composition, in classrooms, concert halls, and studios, Apple lis 
and Macs deliver a powerful sound. 



The MIDI Beat 

How does one person play^4 Bicycle Built for Two in three-quarter time on four 
instruments? Through the magic of MIDI, of course. Whether you're a performing 
musician, a composer, or someone who just likes to tweak notes in your basement, you 
can plug in your synthesizer and let your Apple pump up the volume. All together now . 



inCider's View * Dan Muse 

Systematic Gamble: Apple Rolls a 7.0 

Stattus Report * Paul Statt 

The Architecture of Software Piracy. 1 

Bridging the Gap * Gregg Kdzer 

Long Live 7.0 24 

AppleWorks in Action * Ruth Witkin 
Ye Old Tax Tracker 50 

Press Room * Cynthia E. Field 

Desktop-Publishing Star Search .DO 

Applesoft Adviser * Dan Bishop 

Bit-Map Attack 60 

Learning Curve * David D. Thombwrg 

A Revolution in Computer Literacy 7 L 

A2 



Departments 

Letters to the Editor.. 

What's New 

News, New-Product Focus, 
Notes from the APA 



Apple Clinic 

Backing Out Gracefully: 
Double Reverse, Vulcan 
Logic, Is It Full or Not? 
Laser UDC, Apple- 
Works Clinic ,....20 

Reviews 

Design Your Own 
Railroad, Tesserae, 
Children's Newspaper 
Maker, Super GS Award Maker. 

Hints 

Words to the Wise 



Editors 1 Choice 

Milestones 2000 



.10 



.12 




p. 12 

.30 
.70 
.80 



Downloaded from wwwApple2Ontine.c0m 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 7 



INCIDER'S VIEW 



Systematic Gamble; 
Apple Rolls a 7.0 

Apple's upping the OS ante — System 7 will 
change the way computer users judge integration. 



^W" 4 "Then the Macintosh was first introduced in 1984, 1 was 
* f\ I doing the majority of my work as managing editor of 
\l %/ Microcomputing magazine on an MS-DOS computer 
jf f running WordStar and 1-2-3. When our two just- 
released 128K Macs arrived, however, I quickly snagged one for my 
desk. It was obvious even then that the Mac had a lot going for it. 
With its desktop, or Finder — or whatever you choose to call that 
unique look and feel — the Macintosh was simply different and, 

to many, better. The only ques- 
tion back then was whether or 
not the Mac would generate 
the same software-development 
effort the Apple II did. It did, 
but it didn't happen overnight. 
Early users spent a lot of time 
waiting for their computer and 
waiting for software. The Mac 
eventually gained momentum, 
though, and pointing and click- 
ing became a way of life. 

Over the years other systems 
have emulated the Mac success- 
fully. No one does it as well, but 
just about every computer from 
the Commodore 64 to DEC's 
Micro Vax takes advantage of 
mice, overlapping windows, and 
fonts these days. Most recently, 
Microsoft's Windows has been nipping at 
Apple's GUI (graphical user interface) heels. 
It doesn't turn an MS-DOS clone into a Mac, 
but, as the expression goes, it's close enough 
for government work. When Windows 3.0 hit 
the streets last May, it was clear that Apple 
needed to up the ante, and it has. System 7, 
Apple's new operating system, is an inge- 
nious accomplishment that puts some dis- 
tance between the Mac and the competition. 




By DAN MUSE * EDITOR IN CHIEF 



Does that mean you should rush out and 
plunk down your $99 for an upgrade kit? 
Maybe not just yet. The price of entry to 7.0 
isn't steep, but it's there. I've installed System 
7 on an SE/30 with 5 megabytes of RAM 
and haven't noticed any major performance 
degradation. Paul Statt, however, running 
the new operating system on his LC with the 
7.0 minimum of 2 megs of RAM, reacted 
with language I don't dare repeat here. 
(Well, it may be slow, but System 7 sure looks 
nice on his color LC.) If you upgrade, plan 
on at least 2.5 megabytes of RAM. 

In addition, some of 7.0's features won't 
be available immediately. The premise and 
the promise of System 7 center around 
sharing files and information among appli- 
cations and among users. These highly 
touted features — "publish and subscribe," 
"interapplication communication," and 
"Apple events" — take cut and paste a big 
step further. If you want to share your draw- 
ing of a dog with other dog lovers, for 
instance, you can select the graphic and then 
publish an "edition" containing it. If anyone 
is interested, he or she can "subscribe" to it. 
But applications will have to be revised to 
implement this level of communications. 

Educators, however, may not want to 
wait. System 7's peer-to-peer networking 
capabilities will be tempting for anyone 
running AppleShare. With 7.0, you can 
reclaim that Mac you've been using as a 
dedicated file server; now any Mac on the 
network can share files with other Macs. 

System 7 will change the way computer 
users judge integration. If you want to 
move forward with your Mac, it's inevitable 
that you'll upgrade. Even if you don't want 
to share anything, there are other 7.0 temp- 
tations: on-line balloon help, easier font 
and desk-accessory installation, a more 
flexible find-file feature, and more. 

Unless you're on a network, however, our 
advice is to move slowly. In fact, you may 
want to wait for 7.0 to become 7.1. Why? It's 
fun now to reminisce about those first Macs, 
but I'm sure the people who bought them 
didn't enjoy their expensive pioneer expe- 
rience. The potential's great, but we expect 
that 7.0 will experience the same sluggish 
first year the original Mac did. □ 



8 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 




USA/CANADA TOLL FREE 

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708-888-8300 




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CD Fun House CD 42.95 

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Grolier Electronic Encyclopedia.. CD 274.95 

Bio Sci II LD 492.95 

Aids LD 493.95 

Pioneer LaserDisc LD-V2200 Player 699.95 

NEC Intersect CDR-36 CD-ROM Player 475.00 




Multiples of SO 

Disks -5.25" DS/DD..$ .35 
Disks - 3.5" DS/DD 69 

10 Pack Assortment 

Color Disks - 5.25" 6.95 

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250 Sheet Assortment 

Color Paper 10.95 



THE WRITING CENTER 



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ImageWriter II 4-color 4.95 

ImageWriter II 4-color Heat Trans 14.95 
Panasonic KX-P 1090, 1091, 1092* 3.25 

Epson MX/FX/RX 70, 80* 2.50 

Epson LX 80/90* 2.50 

Epson MX 1 00 4.00 

IBM ProPrinter 4.75 

Okidata 1 82/1 92/1 93 2.99 

* For quantities less than 6 or for colors - add $1 .00 each 



The Combo Pack 



To Enhance the Chidren's 
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Vulcan 40 meg Hard Drive APL/IIgs .. 649.95 

Quickie Hand Scanner APL/llcs 194.95 

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1 1 1 Easy RAM 64K Memory Upgrade ... 1 8.95 

I Laser 128 Color System 499.95 1 

Laser 1 28 Monochrome Monitor 349.95 1 



EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES 
1550 Executive Drive 
Elgin, Illinois 60123 




Legally Blind 

i read with great interest 
Dr. Bruce Williams' letter in the May 
issue. (See "Family Computing," p.14.) 
As legally blind IlGS users, my wife and I 
have experienced numerous frustrations. 

The biggest problem is the lack of infor- 
mation provided by Apple on modifying or 
otherwise working around the Finder — 
the pointer is too small, the desktop back- 
ground color provides insufficient contrast 
with the windows, and the list goes on. As 
novice users, we don't understand ProDOS 
intuitively and our GS documentation told 
us nothing about launching programs from 
outside the Finder. Nor do we know how to 
adapt AppleWorks for speech, although we 
own both Echo+ and Slotbuster speech 
synthesizer cards. 

Our quest has taken us through numerous 
telephone calls to Apple's customer service/ 
special needs center (only marginally help- 
ful) and placed us in contact with "Closing 
the Gap," a special project concerned with 
adapting technology for handicapped users. 
Getting information on adapting the IlGS 



to make it useful "out of the box" seems 
much harder than it should. Even Apple 
was unable to give us any useful information. 

I'd like to hear from other challenged 
Apple IIgs users, especially those who are 
visually impaired. You may respond via 
cassette, Braille, or inkprint. Anyone who 
can tell me how I can make AppleWorks 
accessible to my wife via speech synthesis, or 
how to launch programs without the Finder, 
please contact me soon. Let's communicate! 

Paul Shallbetter 

604 Southwest First Street 

Faribault, MN 55021-5806 

The PACER Computer Resource Center is a 
nonprofit organization specializing in providing 
alternatives for handicapped users of all hard- 
ware platforms. Contact them at 4826 Chicago 
Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN 55417, (612) 
827-2966. Direct your inquiries to Judy 
Simon, computer-resource coordinator. — eds. 



No Regrets 

GREGG KEIZER'S COMPARISON 
of the of the Macintosh LC and the 
Apple IIgs was interesting, but we 
object to Mr. Keizer's comment that IIgs 
owners who buy a Q-Drive will "regret it 
later." (See "Side By Side, Head To Head," 
June 1991, p. 22.) We've shipped thou- 
sands of Q-Drives since their introduction 
last fall, and they've proven to be the most 
reliable hard drives we've ever sold. Few 
Q-Drive owners "regret" their purchases. 

Mr. Keizer's contention that the Q-Drive 
eats up a lot of desk space is ridiculous. It 
fits snugly between the IIgs and a monitor, 
or you can stand the drive on its side beside 
the IIgs. But that's not the point. Desk 
space is usually the least important 
concern for hard-drive shoppers. Don't 
overlook the Q-Drive' s many advantages 
over internal drives. Because the Q-Drive 



is a SCSI hard drive, it can move with you 
to a Mac or a PC. You can also connect 
additional SCSI devices without using up 
slots, and you can speed up your SCSI chain 
with the RamFast/SCSI card — an option 
that isn't available to internal drives. 

I can't imagine why anyone would pay 
more for a drive that offers none of these 
features. For the difference in price 
between the Q-Drive and a comparable 
internal drive, you could buy the Ram- 
Fast/SCSI card. Why pay more just to keep 
the hard drive off your desk? If your desk 
is like mine, a little less clutter won't make 
a visible difference anyway. 

Actually, the following quote sums it all 
up nicely: "An internal hard-disk drive 
costs more that an external one, runs more 
slowly, turns up the heat in your Apple 
IIgs or lie and probably won't work in the 
next computer you buy. So why buy one?" 
If that looks familiar, it should — - it's from 
the December 1990 issue of inCider/A±\ 
We couldn't agree more. 

Joseph P. Gleason 
President, Quality Computers 
20200 E. Nine Mile Road 
St. Clair Shores, Ml 48080 

As journalists, we should be used to seeing 
statements taken out of context. The quote Mr. 
Gleason refers to is from the 'Apple II Holiday 
Shopping Guide, " (December 1990, p. 57). We 
go on to answer our rhetorical question by 
recommending the Applied Engineering Vulcan 
internal hard drive. 

We have nothing against the Q-Drive and 
didn't intend to single it out as a product some- 
one would regret purchasing. We mentioned it 
only as an example of an affordable external 
hard drive. The point we were making is that no 
one should overlook the many advantages of 
desk space. Users suffering from "peripheral 
overload" giggle uncontrollably at the thought 
of having a space to maneuver their mouse or 
operate a hand-held scanner. — eds. 



10 • inCider/A+ • August 1931 



LOWEST PRICES ANYWHERE! 



Cautionary Tales 

on receiving your march issue 
I noted the advertisement for Zip Chips 
from Computer Enhancers and sent 
them a check with my order. Although the 
company cashed the check, I haven't received 
anything. Computer Enhancers hasn't 
answered a follow-up letter, nor has a repre- 
sentative answered its phone. Can mCider/A + 
exert any influence on the company to get it to 
act responsibly? 

David Herbert 

2009 Klamath River Drive 

Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 

David, your letter is one of many we^ve 
received concerning Computer Enhancers. We 
tried to contact them several times, both by phone 
and by mail, with no success. At press time, 
however, we received a letter from Bruce 
Maclntyre of Computer Enhancers, which 
included the following statement: "Computer 
Enhancers regrets its present circumstances and 
inconvenience to its customers and will right 
the situation just as fast as possible. " — eds. 



GEOCENTRIC 

DONT GET ME WRONG. APPLEWORKS 
is fine, but GEOS (graphic-environ- 
ment operating system) should be 
more popular. I enjoy having Mac-like 
windows on my Apple He, the endless 
features, the ease of use, and, when loaded 
into my 512K RamWorks III, the speed. 
When you consider geoPaint and geoPub- 
lish, not to mention the many desk accessories 
available, GEOS is more powerful than 
AppleWorks. And, with Berkeley Softworks' 
Creativity Disks, I have over 40 fonts from 
which to choose. 

When I bought GEOS, I subscribed to 
geo World magazine, which was great for 
those owning Commodores. Is there an 
Apple GEOS user group out there? 

Geoff Malta 

5263 Deborah Drive 

Piscataway, NJ 08854 



inCider/A+ welcomes readers' comments. We 
reserve the right to edit letters for clarity, 
style and space. please address your corre- 
SPONDENCE to Letters, inCider/A+, 80 Elm 
Street, Peterborough, NH 03458. 



BEST SERVICE ! NO HIDDEN COSTS! 



UNIV& SCHOOL P.O.'S WELCOME! 



APPLE IIGS UPGRADES 



4 MEGabyte IIGS RAM board. 

Fully DMA Compatible w/1 MEG $99 

Expands ROM 01 & ROM 3 llgs ...w/2 MEG $149 

Fall Special w/4 MEG $229 

AEGS-RAM+ 6 MEG RAM board .w/1 MEG $189 

256K RAM SET (8pc) Lifetime Wty $18 

256K RAM 3 Set Special <24pc) $49 

1 MEG RAM Set (8pc) 5 Yr Wty $55 

IIGS Serial/Parallel Converter $59 

IIGS replacement Power Supply $75 

SoundSystem 2 New 2-Way Amplified 

Speaker Pair. Put the S in your IIGS $89 



1GS 105 MEG PRO-DRIVE 



The fastest Quantum HardDrive (10ms). 
Complete w/Apple Hi-Speed SCSI Card. 
BONUS 25 Megabytes of the Best IIGS 
Public-Domain & Shareware Programs. 
PLUG AND PLAY READY! $699 



lie lie MEGABYTE RAT 



Licensed by Applied Engineering. A 100% 
replacement for Extended 80 card. Expands 
Appleworks desktop to 998K and allows 
instant switching between modules. 

Above W/256K $89 

Above W/512K $109 w/1 Meg $149 

Super Expander C Expands lie to 1 1 52K, 
Appleworks desktop to 1052K, & allows in- 
stant module switching W/256K $99 

Above W/512K $119 w/1 Meg $159 



QUIET COOLING FANS 



SuperFan II for ll+/lle. Kensington Style 

w/surge protect & twin rear AC outlets 

Super Cooler GS for your Itgs. No audio line 
interference, internal Mount 



PRO-KEYPAD for lie lie 



Numberic data entry made simple. Includes 
mathematic, decimai & RETURN keys. 

PRO KEYPAD for U.S. & European Me 

PRO KEYPAD for U.S. & European lie. .. 



APPLE II Plus OWNERS 



$27 
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$34 
$39 



Run Appleworks on your II+ or Franklin Ace! 

NEW Plusworks ill will configure any version 
of Appleworks to run on your computer. One 
time configure package. Not a pre-boot. 
A.W. 1.0-2.1 req. 64K.80 columns, shft key mod. 
A.W. 3.0 req. 1 28K, 80 columns, shift key mod. 

Plusworks III w/complete docs $39 

16K RAM BD. Expands II+ from 48K to 64K .. $34 
128K RAM BD. Legend/Titan Compatible... $64 
DOS/ProDOS Emulator for above 1 28K BD .. $24 

80 Column 11+ Board Videx compatible $48 

Shift Key Modification $7 

Lower Case Adapter. Rev. 7 & up $12 



FALL SPECIALS 



PBC EXTENDED 80 COLUMN CARD for 

Apple He. Expands lie to 128K (Appleworks 
desktop to 56K). Super sharp 80 column 
display, soft switch select 40/80 columns, & 

Double Hi-res graphics, all built-in! $35 

PBC 256K/80 COLUMN BORD He All 
above features, plus expands your Apple- 
works 3.0 desktop to 1 37K INTRO $79 

Super Serial Board 100% replacement for 
Apple Super Serial Card, this versatile 
RS232 board can be used for all modems 

and serial printers. For IH7lle/IIgs $48 

SSB to Imagewriter I cable 10' $11 

SSB to Imagewriter II cable 10' $11 

SSB to Modem (Standard RS232) 10' $11 



lORE SUPER SPECIALS! 



Graphic Parallel Board w/6ft cable. Text & 
graphic screen prints. Versatile graphics 
including inverse/normal, enhanced, 90 
degree rotate & double size print. Il+/e/gs. . $44 
Parallel Printer Board w/cable. Text print 
only. Used where graphics is not required.. $35 
Z80 CP/M Board Opens the CP/M world for 

ll+/e/gs. Microsoft & Turbo Pscal Comp $34 

Joystick 111 Similar to the Hayes Mach III, 

with large fire button on stick $24 

6 AMP Power Supply. Drop in replacement 

for ll+/lle supply. Double the amp power! ... $49 

TV Modulator Connects your Apple ll+/lle to 

any color or black/white TV $15 

Serial/Parallei Converter. Connects your lie 

to any parallel printer $49 

AE Transwarp 3.6Mhz accelerator. tl+/e... $99 
ZIPCHIP 8Mhz by Zip Tech. Ile/llc $159 



DISK DRIVES! 



Disk Drive H/H for Apple li+/lle $119 

Disk Drive H/H for Apple llc/llc+Mgs $119 

Disk Drive H/H Dsy Chainable llc+/llgs $139 

Disk Controller BD 5.25" ll+/lle/llgs $34 

AMR 3.5" Drive $194 

A.E. 3.5" Drive $199 

Disk Controller BD 3.5" ll+/lle $49 

. AE VULCAN HARD DRIVES Call 

CMS20MEG EXT. W/SCSI CARD $399 



GAMEPORT SWITCHBOX 



Switch between mouse & joystick or any two 
gameport peripherals. Free master cable... $29 



COPY II PLUS 



The ultimate copy program. For 5.25"-3.5"- 
Hard drives. 

8.4 w/5*/4 diskette $15 

Connect 2/4 Computers to One Printer! 

Parallel (A/B) 2-Way $25 

Parallel (A/B/C/D) 4 Way $35 

Serial (A/B) 2 Way $25 

Serial (A/B/C/D) 4 Way $35 

Mini-Din 8 w/Master Cbl (A/B) 2-Way $35 

Mini-Din 8 w/Master Cbl (A/B/C/D) $45 

We carry a full line of cables for the 

Apple II and Mac serieis! Call! 



5 YEAR NO HASSLE WARRANTY ON ALL PC BOARDS! 
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PRICE BUSTERS (619) 589-0081 

4233 Spring St., Ste. 402, La Mesa, CA 92041 
Monday-Friday 10 a.m. -5 p.m. Pacific Time 




Circle 105 on Reader Service Card. 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 11 



What's New 




MS-DOS 
APPLEWORKS 




A Creative Challenge 



w 



e've taken some heat for writ- 
ing about Mac products — 
so what would you say to an 
"MS-DOS clone" of Apple- 
Works 3.0? Remarkable 
Technologies' SuperWorks ($199), has 
caused more than one double-take 
around here. SuperWorks functions 
like AppleWorks on any IBM 
PC/XT/AT/PS or compatible with 
256K of memory (512K recommended) 
and a disk drive — except that it's 
faster and the alternate (Alt) key does 
the job of the open-apple key. It also 
looks great on a color monitor. You 
can even change the colors of under- 
lined or boldface text, for instance. 

If you use AppleWorks and can train 
your fingers to find their way around 
an MS-DOS keyboard, you can use 
SuperWorks. It even incorporates 
some features for which AppleWorks 
users pay extra, such as a macro 
programming language, telecommu- 
nications, a visible clipboard, seamless 
cut and paste between files, and the 
ability to hold as many as 126 files on 
the desktop at any one time. The 
SuperWorks spreadsheet not only 
imports Lotus 1-2-3 (as well as 
AppleWorks) files, it also uses Lotus' 
unique "3-D" spreadsheet model to let 
you combine data from many files. 

If you have years of AppleWorks expe- 
rience (but less money than loyalty 
invested in Apple) and you want to make 
that next computer an MS-DOS — 
SuperWorks is for you. You could even 
type in one of Ruth Witkin's templates. 
For more information contact 
Remarkable Technologies at 245 
Pegasus Avenue, Northvale, NJ 07647, 
(201) 784-0900, or circle 35 1 on the 
Reader Service card. —- P.S. 



For the physically challenged and de- 
velopmentally disabled, a personal 
computer can make the difference. That 
is, the difference between busy work and 
productive careers; the difference be- 
tween hiring someone to read books 
aloud and reading for pleasure them- 
selves; the difference between watching 
basketball games on TV and playing them 
on the computer; the difference between 
being victims of circumstance and 
taking charge of life. 




But the tech- 
nology that really makes a difference in 
people's lives isn't always listed in the 
catalog of the company that makes the 
computer. That's why Johns Hopkins 
University is sponsoring a search for ideas 
in "Personal Computing to Assist Persons 
with Disabilities" this year. 

A similar search, conducted by Johns 
Hopkins ten years ago, highlighted the 
Apple Adaptive Firmware Card for the 
Apple II. (It was one of over eight thou- 
sand entries.) This card has made possi- 
ble hundreds of software solutions for phys- 
ically challenged and developmentally 
disabled persons, because it lets them use 



off-the-shelf software, Johns Hopkins also 
spotlighted a Braille word processor, an 
ultrasonic head control for wheelchairs, 
and an eye-tracking system that lets a 
person manipulate a computer using his or 
her eyes only. 

Paul Hazan, project director, expects 
that this year's search will affect even 
more people: "In 1981 there were fewer 
than a quarter of a million personal 
computers in the hands of Americans. 
Today there are about 20 million — 
almost a hundredfold increase — 
with a commensurate increase in the 
number of creative people who are 
computer literate." 

Hazan also notes that "the equip- 
ment is much more capable," but 
don't worry about yours — it makes 
no difference if you're using an Apple 
II Plus or a Mac Ilfx. Your entry can 
be hardware or software, and the 
competition is open to computer 
professionals, students, and amateurs. 
Entries will be recognized in four 
areas: employment, independent 
living, education, and leisure. Regional 
fairs across the country will display 
winning entries on the way to the 
national fair and awards ceremony at the 
Smithsonian Institution in Washington, 
DC, on February 1 and 2, 1992. 

The grand prize is $10,000, and more 
than 100 other prizes will be given for 
the best ideas, systems, devices, and 
computer programs. But more important 
than the prize money is the goal of mak- 
ing the public aware of challenges some 
people face, and the creative, innovative 
ways they meet them. 

The deadline for the competition is 
August 23, 1991. Anyone who wants to 
enter should request an entry flier by writ- 
ing to Computing to Assist Persons with 
Disabilities (CAPD), P.O. Box 1200, 
Laurel, MD 20723. — P.S. 



12 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



NEW-PRODUCT FOCUS MAC APPLE II APPLE Mgs 



NEW SOFTWARE 



Animation Works 

It used to cost a fortune 
and take weeks of training 
to create animated moving 
pictures on the Macintosh, 
but with Animation Works 
[$199.95) Gold Disk has 
dropped the price for schools 
and straightened the learning 
curve. The Animation Works 
Education Lab Pack costs 
only $475, and you can use it 
with as many as five 
Macintoshes. 

Animation Works consists 
of a Cel Editor for creating 
animated characters called 
eels, a Background Editor for 
drawing relatively static 
scenery, and a Movie Editor 
that combines eels and back- 
grounds. Teachers will be able 



1213) 320-5080 tin 
Canada reach the com- 
pany at 5155 Spectrum 
Way, Unit 5, 
Mississsuga, Ontario 
L4W 5A1 , 
416-602-4000), or 
circle 353 on the 
Reader Service card. 



b; 



File Edit Text booths liulo Florae Event Pali) 



mm a 



to animate every kind of 
lesson, from plant growth to 
sentence building, from the 
physics of space flight to the 
interior of the atom. 

Animation Works imports 
Macintosh-standard audio 
files [MacRecorder and SND) 
and graphics files (PICS and 
PICT), and can be used with 
HyperCard, as well. Animation 
Works movies can run on 
anybody's Macintosh, even if 
he or she doesn't have 
Animation Works. 

For more information 
contact Gold Disk at 20675 
South Western Avenue, Suite 
120, Torrance, CA 90501 , 



♦ ■ 

Bridge Builder 

ored with computer 
games and seeking 
new ways to have some 
fun? Try building a bridge 
with Bridge Builder, a simu- 
lation developed by an engi- 
neer to teach beginners the 
gentle and difficult art of 
connecting two riverbanks 
with a road. 

Playing with Bridge Builder is 
fun, but you learn some pretty 
serious engineering topics 
such as force, stability, 
efficiency, and strength 
as you tie steel girders 
and joints into a simu- 
lated bridge. To test 
your bridge, you drive 
a simulated 80,000- 
pound truck across it. 
Will it crash? 
Bridge Builder gives 
students and anybody 
else a harmless play- 
ground where they can 
experiment with engi- 
neering. This "trial and 
error" approach with 
simulation is the way 
engineers work, and 
Bridge Builder offers a 
fascinating introduction 
to this field. 

Bridge Builder costs only 
$36 from Pre-Engineering 
Software, 1266 Kimbro 
□rive, Baton Rouge, LA 
70808, (504) 769-3728. For 
more information contact the 
company or circle 354 on the 
Reader Service card. 




Playin' HardBall II 

Following on the heels of 
HardBall is Accolade's 
HardBall II ($54.95) for the 
Mac. It's as easy to play as 
the original — it uses the 
same interface as the Apple II 
and IIgs versions — but stars 
improved animation. 

HardBall II also includes more 
major-league ballparks — a 
total of seven — which make 
playing an entire season much 
more fun. Perhaps in response 
to the Rotisserie League fad, 
Accolade now lets you store 




more player statistics on disk. If 
reliving moments of glory in 
statistics bores you, you can 
replay them with HardBall ll's 
TV Instant Replay . Another 
major-league improvement is 
the ability to shift the positions 
of your fielders for each batter. 
All in all, HardBall II is just 



more true to life — or to 
television, if that's 
how you take your 
sports. It requires a 
Mac with 1 megabyte, 
supports color on the 
LC and II series (needs 
2 megabytes) and uses 
off-disk copy protection. 
For more information 
contact Accolade at 550 
South Winchester 
Boulevard, San Jose, CA 
951 28, (408) 985-1700, or 
circle 352 on the Reader 
Service card . 



Cosmic Wizardry 

Wizardry: Bane of the 
Cosmic Forge ($59.95) 
has captured the title of Top 
Role Playing Game, according 
to the readers of Computer 
Gaming World , and now it's 
after the hearts and minds of 
Mac users everywhere. But 
first, Mac players will need to 
forget their Apple Macintosh 
windows and pull-down menus. 

Sir-Tech Software felt that the 
computer power needed for com- 
bining action and adventure sim- 
ply asked too much of the Apple 
interface. So Sir-Tech wrote its 
own. This game requires 1 
megabyte of memory, and 
1 800K of system memory must 
be free on color Macs [800K on 
black-and-white). To install it on a 
hard drive, you need 2.5 
megabytes of free disk space. 

In the best tradition of 
fantasy role-playing, this 
game calculates your every 
step — and the full-color 
animated graphics will knock 
your armor off. 
Contact the company at P. □. 
Box 245, Ogdensburg 
Business Center 2E, 
Ogdensburg, NY 13669, (315) 
393-6633, or circle 355 on 
the Reader Service card. 



Illustration • Elizabeth Auer 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 13 



WHAT'S MW 



NEW-PRODUCT FOCUS A MAC APPLE II I APPLE lies 



A ♦ ■ 
School Days 

If your school has assembled 
a motley crew of mature 
Apple lis, Macs of a certain 
age, and old MS-DOS comput- 
ers, SchoolWorks:Department 
Head may be the solution. 

This product is a set of 
templates designed for use with 
AppleWorks on the Apple II or 
Hgs, or for use with Microsoft 
Works on the Mac or an 
MS-DOS compatible. From the 
principal's office to the class- 
room, these templates help you 
inventory supplies, write, revise, 
and review lesson plans, record 
your classroom observations of 
teachers, and file their addresses, 
telephone numbers, and other 
pertinent information. 

The documentation is in the 
software, and the $55 purchase 
price includes a site license for 
your entire school — it makes 
sharing information simple and 
legal. For more information 
contact K-12 MicroMedia 
Publishing at 6 Arrow Road, 
Ramsey, IMJ 07446, (800] 292- 
1997, or circle 356 on the 
Reader Service card. 

a. c: 

Address Master 

Looking for an easy, inex- 
pensive way to keep simple 
records on your Apple Hgs or 
Mac? Try Prelude Software's 
Address Master ($39.95). 

Address Master lets you 
maintain multiple files of 
names, addresses, telephone 
numbers, and other data. You 
can sort records and print 
them as mailing labels, then 
sort them by ZIP code to take 
advantage of lower postal 
rates. You can also print a 
pocket-sized address book. 

A unique feature of Address 
Master is that the Apple Hgs 
and Macintosh versions can 



each use and process files 
created Dn the other — as well 
as on the MS-DOS version. For 
details contact Prelude 
Software at P. 0. Box 1 3 1 7, 



File MM BeEflrd titt (Ipiiain 




Cuuntri ===) ! : _ 

Telephone 1 =>L ~ 

Telephone 2 => l 

Telephone 2 Extension -> | I 
Relationship I 2 ' ' ■ ' I 
Remarvs ==> j . "■' j 
Mairihg list : 1 I 



High-Speed SCSI card, blazing 
speed may not be a factor. 
For more information contact 
Tulin at 2156H OToole Avenue, 
San Jose, CA 951 31 , C408) 
432-9025, or circle 
359 on the Reader 
Service card. 



: PKIHARY FIRST MAKE: Type up »o I0i»tl9rs arid press RETURN. : 

OSovb - Nem Pertonol QS<iub Dotes Scre&n O Concel 
Cliaue - Heui Buitntit ; Q St ii e ^ Cle iir S creen - ■ ; - ; _ 



Costa Mesa, CA 92628-1317, 
(7143 751-5736, or (800) 
678-7613, or circle 357 on 
the Reader Service card. 

NEW HARDWARE 

A ♦ ■ 
I Need My Space, Dude 

Hard drives have been 
shrinking in size and price, 
and growing in capacity. Plus 
Development Corporation is 
working on the Macintosh 
Classic market with the 
Impulse series of SCSI storage 
devices. The Impulse 105S/C 
($599) is 1 05 megabytes tiny, 
as it replaces Apple's stan- 
dard hard drive and meets the 
unusually low-power restric- 
tions placed on the new 
Macs. For more information 
contact Plus Development 
Corporation at 1 778 
McCarthy Boulevard, Milpitas, 
CA 95035, (408) 434-6900, 
or circle 358 on the Reader 
Service card. 

External enthusiasts should 
check out Tulin's 120- 
megabyte Half Shell for the 
Apple II and Macintosh. It's 
platinum, it's SCSI, and it's 
half the size of an Apple 5.25- 
inch drive. Tulin claims an aver- 
age access time of 19 millisec- 
onds, but with a list price of 
$789, which includes an Apple 



A ♦ ■ 

Hard Disk 
with Everything 

\s the prices of 
external SCSI hard- 
disk drives for the Apple 
II drop, you probably aren't 
surprised to hear that a 1 00- 
megabyte Quantum subsystem 
drive with a 12-millisecond 
effective access time, drive 
heads that park themselves 
automatically, a push-button 
SCSI ID selector, RAM caching, 
and a full one-year warranty is 
available for only $599. 

But would you believe that 
Resource Central's 100- 
megabyte drive also includes 
on the disk, at no extra 
charge, every issue of 
A2-Central/Dpen-Apple ever 
published, a complete set of 
Apple Technical Notes, sample 
issues of 8/1 6-Central (for 
programmers) Stack-Central 
(for HyperStudio users), 
TimeOut- Ce ntrai (for 
AppleWorks and TimeOut 
users), and Hyperbole (for liter- 
ary types curious about hyper- 
media), in addition to the usual 
roundup of public-domain and 
shareware utilities, graphics, 
patches, font editors, icon edi- 
tors, and games? 

Believe it. Resource Central 
also sells a 42-megabyte 
hard-disk drive with removable 
media (for foolproof backups 
and easy transport) for only 
$699. These drives require a 
SCSI interface card (available 
separately from Resource 
Central) and will work with any 



Apple He, Hgs, or Laser Apple- 
compatible computer. (They 
work with Macintoshes, too, 
but you'll need to format the 
disk yourself and destroy all 
that value-added data.) 

For more information 
contact Resource Central at 
P.O. Box 11250, Overland 
Park, KS 66207, (913) 469- 
6502, or circle 360 on the 
Reader Service card. 

NEW RESOURCES 
♦ 

Special Topics 

High-school math teachers 
often wonder, "How can I 
motivate my students who are 
way ahead of everybody else?" 

William K. Bradford's Special 
Topics in Mathematics series 
is designed with those 
students in mind. It's for 
academic achievers in middle 
or high school who want to 
study subjects not usually 
seen in high-school math 
classes — such as logic, prob- 
ability, permutations, and 
combinations — and expand 
their knowledge of math and 
develop their thinking skills, too. 

The program teaches each 
subject at two levels, making 
a total of six disks — Logic 
Level I and II, Probability 
Level I and II, Permutations, 
and Combinations. All six 
disks (also available for 
MS-DOS computers) cost 
only $270, a savings of 50 
percent off the $90 price of 
a single disk. Bundles of two 
disks are $90, at the same 
significant savings. 

Contact William K. 
Bradford at 310 School 
Street, Acton, MA 01720, 
£508) 263-6996, E800) 
421-2009, for more informa- 
tion, or circle 350 on the 
Reader Service card. 



14 • inCider/A+ * August 1991 



NOTES 



AppleWorks 

Programmers 

Association 



USERS AND PROGRAMMERS 

Sharing the Power to Create 

AW Tip: Put your creativity to work and expand your use of the 
AppleWorks Clipboard. Let's discuss several methods of 
exchanging data in AppleWorks 3.0. 

• Open apple-C (OA-C) in all modules copies data to and from 
the Clipboard. OA-C copies database records, spreadsheet rows, 
columns, and blocks, and any portion of word-processing files into 
the Clipboard for direct pasting to files in the same or other 
modules. But when you copy information from the Clipboard it 
may land diiferendy in the destination file. When you copy data from 
the database to the spreadsheet, for example, records become rows, 
categories become columns, and visa versa. (This feature is handy 
for manipulating numerical data in a database.) Providing that 
you've opened enough categories in the destination database file, 
when you move information, all data will transfer. 

When you paste spreadsheet data into the word processor (whether 
it's copied to the Clipboard as a row, a column, or a block) each 
spreadsheet row will become a word-processor paragraph with tabs 
inserted between spreadsheet columns. Information from the 
database arrives in similar fashion — records become paragraphs with 
tabs between categories. When you copy word-processing data to 
either the spreadsheet or a database and no tabs are present in the 
source document, each line in the word processor will be copied 
to the first category of the corresponding database record, or the 
first column in the corresponding spreadsheet row. When tabs 
are present in the source word-processing file, though, the data will 
land in successive categories or columns when you copy it to the 
database or spreadsheet. Returns in the word processor paste the 
data in subsequent database records or spreadsheet rows. 

Copying data to and from the Clipboard to the same type of file 
places information exactly as it appeared in the source file (assum- 
ing the tabbing is the same in a word-processing file or the number 
of categories is the same in a database file). 

• OA-M in all modules moves data to and from the Clipboard. 
This command's results are almost identical to the Copy 

command (OA-C), except it removes data from the source file. It uses 
less RAM, so favor it if your system has memory restraints. You 
can preserve the original data by working with a renamed backup 
of the original source file. AppleWorks won't allow movement of all 
the records from a database. Adding a "ZZZ" dummy record to 
your database lets you move all the records you want. 

• OA-P in databases and spreadsheets prints data to the Clipboard. 
Printing to the Clipboard is similar to printing on paper, except 

what you see on screen is all you print to the Clipboard. When you 
move data from the Clipboard to a spreadsheet or database all 
data will appear in either one spreadsheet column or one database 
category. Use this technique to combine two or more database 
categories. (See "AW Macros," April 1991, p. 18, for another 
method of combining categories.) 



• OA-P in the database prints data to the Clipboard for mail- 
merge functions. 

Although you can use this powerful command only in the 
database module, if you copy or move spreadsheet or tabular 
word-processing data to the database as described in the 
instructions above, you can employ this command on all data. 

Also use the mail-merge function to create a boilerplate or glos- 
sary-type application by copying word-processing lines and tabs: 
Copy the data directly to the database via the Clipboard, then 
print to a word-processing document using the mail-merge feature. 
You can also use the mail-merge feature to copy data from 
selected categories in a database to the spreadsheet, or back to 
a database file. 

AW Macros: The macro below changes all the values in the "Price" 
Category in the illustrated (or a similar) database by a factor 
entered by the user. This macro demonstrates using the Clipboard 
and spreadsheet in making numerical changes in a database. 
Start the macro with SA-P from within the database file. 

apa maintains public-domain, freeware, and shareware files including 
templates, patches, and information that it makes available to 
AppleWorks Classic users. For a 5.25-inch disk that includes 
templates, macros, detailed documentation for tips described above, 
and the popular "patcher" program that fixes some flaws in version 
3.0, send $4 shipping to apa at the address below. p lease include 

THE mClDERjA^ ISSUE DATE WITH YOUR REQUEST. FOR MEMBERSHIP INFOR- 
MATION CONTACT THE APPLEWORKS PROGRAMMERS ASSOCIATION, 6531 

Lexington Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90038, modem apa@pro-apa.cts.COm 
(213) 463-9289, voice (213) 469-9916. The AppleWorks Programmers 
Association is registered with the Apple User Group Connection. 

Database Template: 

Stock # Item Dept Price Note X1 X2 



1001 Chair Furniture 63.95 Dining 

1002 Table Furniture 79.45 Dak top -- 
ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ (This is a dummy record) - - 

Macro: 

P:<adb : q = peek $0c54 : {Identify current file }; 

msg ' Enter price change factor - tie: .85, 1.15, stc.3 - and press RTN ' ; 
$0 = getstr 6 : zoom : oa-1 : {Get factor, to MRL, and top of file}: 
oa-m>t<oa-9 up rtn : {Move all but dummy to Clipboard}: 
oa-q esc rtn up : 

rtn rtn>'temp.asp<rtn : {Create temporary spreadsheet}: 

oa-m>f<right right right : {Move data to ASP - position cursor}: 

msg ' Place cursor in price column - Press RTN to accept ' : 

keyto 13 : {Get confirmation of position}: 

right : oa-l>d <rtn ; {Insert new column }; 

>@roundC<left>*<print $0>,2)<rtn: {Type formula }: 

oa-c>w<rtn down>.<oa-S rtn oa-r:{Replicate formula }: 

oa-c>tb<oa-9 rtn oa-1 oa-c>fv< {Strip formulas leaving raw numbers}: 

oa-l>c<rtn rtn rtn > 2 < rtn : {Change layout to Fixed-2}: 

left oa-d>c<rtn : {Delete column with old prices }: 

oa-c>t<rtn oa-9 rtn : {Copy new data to Clipboard }: 

poke SOcBc.O : esc>4<rtn rtn : {Remove temporary ASP file }: 

oa-q print str$ q : rtn : {Get back to database }: 

□a-m>f<msg ' Operation Complete ' >! 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 15 



Stattus report 



The Architecture 
Of Software Piracy 



"Inter application communications" makes 
software piracy even more of a temptation. 

In the Computer Museum in Boston, Massachusetts, there's a 
computer made of Tinkertoys. Theoretically, it could run any 
program your computer can, given enough time and Tinkertoys. 
You see, any two computers are more alike than they are diff- 
erent: Each has several memory chips and one chip that adds 
numbers. Your computer, in theory, can run any program "written for" 
the IBM PC, the Macintosh, or the Apple II. It might require secrets 
from the program's writers that they're not willing to share — specifically 

the "source code." It also might 
not run every program fast. 
But any computer is capable of 
carrying out any arbitrary calcula- 
tion — and any piece of software, 
from VisiCalc to HyperCard, is 
just a string of calculations. 

Every microcomputer is con- 
trolled by a program stored in its 
memory. John von Neumann 
realized that data and programs 
could be treated the same, and 
designed the first modern com- 
puter. His legacy is that I can give 
Microsoft Word to a colleague as 
quickly as I can give him or her a 
text file. It's easy — you may have 
noticed — to copy software. 

Computer and software devel- 
opers are running hard against 
this same wall — called "von Neumann 
architecture " — but from different directions. 
The software peddlers hope you don't notice 
that after spending 45 seconds installing your 
new program on your hard disk, you could 
do the same for every hard disk in the build- 
ing in about 45 minutes. They wouldn't mind 
if you believed that it would work not only just 
on your type of computer, but solely on your 
individual computer, as well. 




By PAUL STATT ; SENIOR EDITOR 



The inventors of the digital computer 
didn't foresee that computer programs 
would be bought and sold. They designed 
computers that would make it easy to run the 
same program on two different machines. 
They did foresee, and planned, that pro- 
grams would be as portable as data, because 
unless two different computers could run 
one program, data and programs couldn't 
share the same physical space on a single 
computer, whether it contained transistors, 
vacuum tubes, or silicon chips. If one com- 
puter is to run different programs, programs 
must be easy to copy. Programs are designed 
to be portable. 

I don't mean to give piracy a good name, 
but I just saw someone from Apple show off 
System 7.0 (the Mac's new operating-system 
software) and create an "alias" of his Mac's 
hard disk. An alias isn't a copy, but it works 
just like one on a network. The Apple 
representative bragged that he can now run 
all the (legal) software on his hard drive on 
any Mac on the same network. An "office on 
a disk," he called it. Another representative 
showed me how my LC, which lacks a math 
coprocessor and drafts complex documents 
slowly, can get a Mac Ilfx on the same net- 
work to do its arithmetic for it — even using 
a different program. Why buy two copies? 

I'm impressed. These are features, not 
problems, of System 7.0. (See p. 24 in this 
issue for more on the technology.) Apple 
says that this is only the beginning of a brave 
new world of "interapplication communica- 
tions," which will tear down the barriers that 
separate individual computers as completely 
as Berliners demolished their wall in 1989. 
Wunderbar. But I expect problems. 

Software piracy isn't going to go away 
because the Software Publishers Association 
convinces enough users it's wrong. It won't 
go away until computers are unable to run 
more than one program. But every new crop 
of computers and system software is making 
it easier, not harder, to use the same software 
on two or more machines. Good will won't 
do the trick. Perhaps site licensing will. But 
I'm glad I'm not in the software develop- 
ment business, struggling to keep pirates 
armed with machines designed for copying 
software from copying software. □ 



16 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



Get the power of AppleWOPkS GS working for YOU! 



Introducing the ALL 
NEW Art Gallery II! 

BOLD IMAGES! LARGE GRAPHICS! 
UNIQUE BORDERS! SPECIAL MESSAGES! 

NOW AVAILABLE! Art Gallery IE has just what you need to add 
zip to your next AppleWorks GS desktop-publishing project! 
Whether it' s a club announcement, school report, business flyer, 
or personal memo.. .Art Gallery II gets people's attention with 
eye-catching graphics! 

Designed exclusively for inCider/A+, this collection gives you a 
wide variety of high-quality, crisp, clean images to choose from. 
Our first Art Gallery was so popular that we created this second 
collection with bolder, larger graphics. PLUS, we made it even 
better by adding exciting, unusual borders and specia! messages 
merged with graphics. OVER 200 ORIGINAL IMAGES IN ALL! 

JUST $39.95! 

And to complete the package, extensive documentation is 
included in a 20-page manual with step-by-step instructions and 
illustrations of every graphic. 



STILL AVAILABLE! Get more of a good thing! 

A limited supply of Art Gallery I is still in stock. Great clip-art at a 
great price! Just $39.95 for over 200 pieces of original artwork PLUS 
a reference chart with complete instructions and illustrations. 



At last, all the power 
of AppleWorks GS 
without all the work! 

Improve your personal productivity while you become an 
AppleWorks pro with AppleWorks GS Productivity Paks. Created 
by Cynthia Field, inttder/A+'$ "Press Room" columnist, these 
ready-to-use template collections are available only through 
inCider/A+. 

With each Productivity Pakyou get ten ready-to-use templates 
to make easy work of your home, business, and school projects! 
Each project includes a blank template and a completed sample to 
use as a model. Plus, you get an extensive manual to guide you 
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JUST $29.95 each! Less than $3 per template! 

AppleWorks GS Productivity Pak I 

MEMO PADS T MEMBERSHIP T NAME BADGES 
MERGE DOCUMENT T AUTO MILEAGE LOG T RESUME 
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AppleWorks GS Productivity Pak II* 

LIVING WILL T FAMILY TREE T BOOKLET 
HOME BUYER'S GUIDE T VIDEOTAPE LIBRARY 
CUSTOM CALENDARS ▼ INCOME TAXES T COOKBOOK 
CAR-COST COMPARISON T COLLEGE GUIDE 

* Requires AppleWorks GS v. 1.1. AppleWorks is a registered trademark of 
Apple Computer, Inc., licensed to Claris Corporation. 



ORDER TODAY! For Immediate Service Call Toil-Free 1-800-343-0728 (in NH 924-0100) 



I want to get the power of AppleWorks GS working for ME! 

Please send me the following #/?C/rfer/4+ Special Products: 



ART GALLERY* 

□ Volume I □ Volume II 



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APPLEWORKS GS PRODUCTIVITY PAK* 

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□ Art Gallery II & AppleWorks GS Productivity Pak II 

□ ALL FOUR items for just $99! SAVE OVER $40! 
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Name 



Address 



City/State/Zip_ 



□ Payment enclosed (payable to inCider/A+) 
Charge my: □ MasterCard □ Visa □ American Express 

Card # Exp. Date 

Signature 

Canadian orders: add 7% GST. Foreign air mail: add $3.95. Foreign orders must be paid in U.S. 
funds drawn on a U.S. bank. 

* Requires AppleWorks GS v.1 .1 . AppleWorks is a registered trademark of Apple Computer, Inc., 

18 1 A 



licensed to Claris Corporation. 

Elm Street, Peterboro 



gh, NH 03458 



. . Preferred Hardware at Preferred Prices! • . 



PCTR 



] 



. R.G.B. Monitors/Video | . Storage Devices 



We offer the best prices, best service, 
and widest selection 
on all PC Transporter products! 




- Shop Both Sides of 
the Software Aisle - 

PC Transporter — $239 

Hgs Kit $36 

Ile/ID Kit............ $29 

MS DOS 4.01 ...$85 

Transdrives 

Combo 5.251' & 3.5" reads 

& writes 360K & 720K $289 

Dual 5. 25" $284 

Single 5.25" ...............$189 

3.5" 720K Add-on . $99 

5.25" Add-on $125 



Keyboards/Monitors 

Honeywell KB w/cable $89 

Headstart M1152C Digital 

Monitor w/cable $159 

Leading Technology 

Digital Monitor w/cable .... $229 



- PCT SPECIALS - 

IBM Compatible 101 key 
Keyboard with A?s IBM 
keyboard cable and PCT 

System disk v2.04 $79 

(you save $100) 



Applied Engineering 

ColorLink RGB (for RamWorks) $103 

Digital Vision 

Computer Eyes GS (color) $199 

Computer Eyes (B&W) $108 

HeadStatt 

New! M1152C Digital Monitor for He 
and/or PCT (includes cable ) $159 

Leading Technology 

New! 1452C Digital Monitor for He 

and/or PCT (includes cable) $229 

Magna vox 

CM135 Analog/Digital RGB Monitor 

(includes digital cable - He, GS) . $289 
IIGS Analog Cable $25 







[ Memory Expansion 


1 


Communications 



Applied Engineering 

New! Uses inexpensive 1 Mb by 4 chips! 

GS-Ram III 1 Mb (GS).. SI 39 

GS-Ram III 2 Mb (GS) SI99 

GS-Ram III 4 Mb (GS) S3 19 

GS-Ram Plus 1 Mb (GS) $205 

GS-Ram Plus 2 Mb (GS) ...$292 

GS-Ram Ultra (GS) Call 

RamWorks III 256K (lie) $139 

RamWorks ffl 1 Mb (lie) $227 

RamFactor 256K (He, 11+) $175 

RamFactor 1 Mb (lie, 11+) $264 

RamCharger $139 

Ram Express II 256K (He, Hc+) $146 

Ram Express II 1 Mb (lie, Ilc+) $205 

Z-Ram Ultra 2 (with clock) 

256K $199 

1 Mb $285 

Memory Chips 

1 Mb Chips (bank) $59 

256K Chips (bank) $24 



Applied Engineering 

SPECIAL! — FREE ReadyLink 
Software with purchase of 

DataLink 1200 $95 

DataLink 2400 bps (int.) $160 

DL 2400 w/SendFAX! (GS) $199 

DataLink Express 2400 (ext.) ...$l69 

DL/X 2400 w/MNP-5 $199 

DL/X 2400 w/MNP-5 & FAX $239 

ZOOM Modems 
7 Year Warranty • Parts & Labor 

Zoom MX 2400 (ext.) , $98 

Zoom/Modem V.42bis $199 

Modem Cables $15 

US Robotics 

Courior HST Dual Standard $949 

Macintosh 

DataLink LC $229 

DLLC 68882 Chip $119 

QuadraLink Multi-Port 

Serial Board for Mac IPs $199 




Seiko DatuGraph 2001 

A complete hardware/software system that puts a 
scheduling/message center right on your wrist! 
Store appointments, birthdates and important 
messages up to 23 months in advance on your 
Seiko 2001 Stainless Steel watch. 
Compatible with Apple II+, lie and Uc. 

Special $39*00 



Accelerators and Co-Processors 



TransWarp GS (make your GS 2 1/2 times faster/) ....$239 

TWGS 32K Cache (Make your TransWarp GS 22% faster!) $79 

TransWarp (Original, reliable accelerator far II, 11+ and lie) $99 

Z-80 Plus (Run Apple CPM programs on your GS, He or 11+) $131 




Quickie Scanner 
by Vitesse 

The fast, smooth, uncomplicated 
hand-held scanner that made 
InWords possible. Scan true gray, 
B&W, or text into your Hgs, He, 
or Laser 128. Features include 
320/640 mode, landscape & 
portrait scan, cut/paste, fat bits, 
resize, rotate, flip, NDA, multiple 
windows and much more! 

Quickie Scanner .... $199 

Quickie w/InWords ..... $269 



Additional Hardware 



Applied Engineering 

TimeMaster HO (GS, He, H+) $79 

Serial Pro (GS, He, H+) $109 

Parallel Pro (GS, He, 11+) $77 

Buffer Pro 32K $85 

Buffer Pro 128K $95 

Buffer Pro 256K $109 

Sonic Blaster (GS) $74.95 

Audio Animator (GS) $169 

Phasor (GS, He, 11+) $77 

Conserver Fan (GS) $77 

Conserver Drive Cable $17 

IIe/H+ Power Supply $59.95 

lies Power Supply $89 

CH Products 

MACH III Joystick $39 

MACH IV Plus $69 

SPECIAL! — Mirage ADB/Quad .... $29 
Kensington 

System Saver (11+ , He) $69 

System Saver GS $75 

Turbo Mouse ADB (GS, Mac) $124 

KeyTronics 

ADB Keyboard (PCT/GS) $139 

Vitesse 

Quickie Scanner (GS, He) $199 



Applied Engineering 
Vulcan Hard Drives include 
controller card and come 
Pre formatted with the latest 
system (specify machine). 

Vulcan 20 Mb $499 

Vulcan 40 Mb S569 

Vulcan 100 Mb S949 

New! 3.5" 1.6 Mb (GS) $248 

3-5" 800K (GS, He, IIc+) $189 

3.5" Controller Card (He, 11+) $65 

5.25" Disk Drive (all Apple H's) $124 

5.25" Controller Card (He, 11+) $55 

AMR 

GS Partner Hard Drives Call 

Apple 

High Speed SCSI (GS, He) $109 

EMAC 

SPECIAL! — Impact 20 Mb 

FAST SCSI Hard Drive — 

2 year warranty! $359 

w/AppleSCSI $459 

New! Impact 80 Mb SCSI $699 

w/AppleSCSI $799 



W * carp, thousands 
°J Apple and 

Macintosh Products. 
V you don* see it 
in our ad, 
gtve us a calU 



Accessories 



Mouse Pads $7.95 

Ribbons 

Imagewriter I/II (black) $3 50 

Value Pack (5 ribbons) $14.50 

Imagewriter I/II (color) $5.99 

Value Pack (3 ribbons) $16.50 

SPECIAL! — QVC Surge/Modem 
Protector provides 6 outlets, 
two phone jacks and 15 Amp 
circuit breaker. 

Don't get ZAPPED!! $34.95 

(Suggested Retail - $55-95) 




Vulcan 40 & 100 Mb 

The Cadillac of Apple hard drives 
given a "5-star" rating by InCider . 
Vulcan comes complete with a 
heavy duty power supply, 16 bit 
ultra fast controller (GS), built-in 
CD A, pseudo-slotting, and support 
for GS/OS, ProDOS, DOS 3-3, 
Pascal 1.3 & CP/M. 
Now Only — 

Vulcan 40 Mb $569 

Vulcan 100 Mb ..... $949 



To Order, Call 1-8QO-327-7234 

P.O. Box 815828 • Dallas, Texas 75381 • FAX (214) 247-8151 




Preferred Software Too! 




-nmaDCR£s 

Publish It! 4 



Voted "Best 
Desktop 
Publishing 
Program of the 

Decade" by Classroom Learning, 
Publish It! 4 requires no previous 
DTP experience to produce top- 
quality, professional looking, 
colorful documents. Publish It! 4 
supports laser printers and 
most popular dot matrix printers. 

Special $87.00 



Education 



Advanced Idea's 

Audobon Wildlife Adventures 
Grizzley Bears or 

Whales GS $39.50 

A.E.C. 

Spanish or French Vocabulary 

orGrammer $19-50 

Return of the Dinosaurs $28.50 

Barron's 

Computer SAT $31.50 

Broderbund 

Bannermania $24.50 

Carmen Sandiego GS (World, 

Europe, USA & Time) $29.50 

Geometry $54.50 

Katies Farm or McGee 524.95 

Playroom 524.95 

Science Tool Kit 

Module 1 or 2 $51.50 

VCR Companion $32.50 

Britannica 

Algebra 1st or 2nd Semester $32.50 

Algebra 1st & 2nd Semester $48.50 

Revolution (GS) $27.50 

Davidson & Associates 

Alge or Math Blaster Plus $32.50 

Math Blaster Mystery $32.50 

Word Attack Plus $32-50 

Learning Company 

Math or Reader Rabbit 524.50 

Writing and Publishing Cntr S36.95 

MECC 

Calendar Grafter, home $32.50 

Oregon Trail 524.50 

USA or World Geograph GS $52.50 

Word or Number Munchers $23.50 

PC Globe 

GeoQuiz or GeoPuzzle $24.95 

Orange Cherry 

Talking Schoolhouse Series Call 

Software Toolworks 

Mavis Beacon Typing GS $32.50 

Mavis Beacon Typing He $26.50 

Weekly Reader 

New Talking Alphabet, 

Shapes or Opposites $29-50 

Stickey Bear ABC's. Numbers 

Opposites or Shapes $24.50 

Other Stickey Bear Titles Call 



Entertainment 



Accolade 

Grand Prix $27.95 

Jack Nicklaus Golf GS 534.50 

Test Drive H or Mean 18 GS 529.50 

Britannica 

Gnarly Golf or Jigsaw $19.95 

Great Western Shootout $19-95 

Laser or Task Force $19.95 

California Dreams 

Blockout $22.50 

Tunnels of Armegeddon $22.50 

Vegas Gambler $22.50 

Electronic Arts 

Madden Football 539.95 

Bismark SI 2.95 

Bards Tale & Bards Tale II Call 

Lucasfilm Games 

Pipe Dreams $24.50 

Maniac Mansion $19.50 

Software Toolworks 
Chessmaster 2100 GS 

( includes classic games disk!) . . $34.50 

Life and Death $34.50 

Other Entertainment Software 

Crystal Quest GS S32.95 

Hunt for Red October $22.50 

Battle Chess $31.95 

Space Ace §36.95 

Tetris $24.95 

2088: The Cryllian Mission $35. 95 



Travel the Oregon Trail and 
Munch Words & Numbers 
along the way with MECC's 
hottest new programs! 




Oregon Trail - Award winning 
adventure simulation. Hunt 
buffalo, raft down treacherous 
rivers, trade for supplies and 
much more! $24.50 

Word & Number Munchers - 

Hungry munchers are on the 
loose, feasting on words and 
numbers. Only your expertise 
can save the day from the 
menacing troggles! $23.50 



Abracadata 

Design Your Own Architecture, 

Interiors or Landscape) GS ...$53.95 

Interiors or Landscape Library $22.50 

Beagle Brothers 

Platinum Paint $57.50 

Br0derbund 

NewPrintshop $29.95 

Printehop GS $36. 50 

PS Graphics Library Party $22.50 

Printshop Companion GS 529.95 



. Communications 



Applied Engineering 

ReadyLink $59.50 

Beagle Brothers 

Point to Point $59-95 

TimeOut Telecom $39.50 

Insync 

Proterm $79.50 

Morgan Davis 

Modem Works $49-00 

Proline BBS Software $169.00 



DESIGN YOUR 




DESIGN YOUR 






OWN HOME 










* ft*** 







































Design your own home architec- 
ture, interiors or landscape with 
Abracadata's popular new series. 
Each program offers pre-drawn 
shapes, side views, scaling, and 
much more! For home design, 
interior planning and landscap- 
ing, Abracadata has the answer. 

Apple D $42.50 

Apple Has $53.95 

Libraries (all Apple ITs) . $22.50 



Productivity 



Beagle Brothers 

AppleWorks 3-0 Companion $23.50 

Beagle Write GS $59.95 

Outliner for AppleWorks 3-0 $42.50 

TimeOut Decision Pak $89-50 

TimeOut Performance Pak $69-50 

TimeOut Power Pak $32.50 

TimeOut ReportWriter $48.50 

TimeOut Style Pak S79-50 

TimeOut Textools 532.50 

TimeOut SuperForms or 

SuperFonts S42.50 

Br0derbund 

Bank Street Writer Plus $49-50 

Claris 

Appleworks 3-0 $174.00 

Appleworks GS $209.00 

Roger Wagner 

Hyper Studio $84.50 

Seven Hills 

Graphic Writer III (GS) $89.95 

Ttraeworks 

Graph-it $53-00 

Pubiish-it 3 $77.00 

Word Perfect 

Word Perfect He or GS $105.95 



--SPECIAL — 

rJ, J lT rea " d receive 
v.8.4 for free, 



To Order Call 
Toll-Free 



1-800-327-7234 Iggg^ 

FAX your Order: 214-247-8151 



Utilities 



Applied Engineering Upgrades 

AppleWorks 3.0 Expander $15.00 

Vulcan Utilities "v 1.4.6" $15.00 

PC Transporter ! 'v2.02" $15-00 

Other Upgrades Call 

Byte works 

Full Line Available Call 

Central Point Software 

Copy 11+ "v9.r S27.50 

Copy 11+ "v8.4" $11.95 

Glen Bredon 

Prosel 16 $54.95 

Prosel 8 Call 

Dos. Master Call 

Morgan Davis 

MD Basic $49.00 

Micol 

Micol Basic lie $59-95 

Micol Basic GS $89.95 

Roger Wagner 

Full Line Available Call 

Soft Spoken 

Cross- Works "V2.G" $68.50 

Vitesse 

Harmony $33.50 

Salvation Deliverance, 

Exorcisor or Rennaissance $29.50 

Salvation Supreme Pack $119-95 

Salvation Wings $49-50 

Westcode 

Inwords (requires scanner) $78.00 

I 1 



Take advantage of any of the 
Salvation Utilities separately, 
or purchase them all in one - 

SALVATION SUPREME! 

• Backup (Backup and Restore) 

• Renaissance (Disk Optimizer) 

• Exorciser (Virus Detector & Cure) 

• Deliverance (Directory Repair 
& File Recovery) 

• Wings (Program Manager/Launcher) 

For Your Apple IIgs. 
Everything you need & more!!! 

Salvation Supreme ... $119.95 



Questions and Customer Service Call 214-484-5464 

VISA, MasterCard and COD orders accepted. Order by phone, mail or FAX. School and Government Purchase Order's 
welcome. Special and Sale items may be limited quantities. Prices and Specifications are subject to change without 
notice. Please verify product compatibility before ordering. Texas residents add 7.25% sales tax. 



Why buy from us? 



» 15 day money back guarantee 
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• UPS and Federal Express Next 
Day Service available. 




Apple clinic 



Backing Out 




Is reverse on an ImageWriter II easier to find 
than it is on a Volkswagen Bug? 



By CECIL FRETWELL 

Double Reverse 

i print letterheads, checks, 
and so on with my ImageWriter IL 
Each time I print I must back the 
continuous-feed paper out of the printer 
manually before I insert my letterhead or 
check. Is there a simple command to make 
the paper reverse itself? 
Jerry Fingerman 
Richfield. MN 



You don't mention the software package you're 
using, so I'm a bit in the dark. If you're using a 
dedicated accounting or finance program, you 
may be out of luck. If you're using a program 
that lets you send control codes to the printer 
(such as AppleWorks 3.0 or AppleWriter), your 
task is fairly simple. 

The character code for the escape key followed 
by a lowercase "r" will make your ImageWtuw 
II reverse linefeed one line. Ifyou know BASIC, 
the following code fragment will make the paper 
reverse one inch if your vertical pitch is set at six 
lines to the inch. 



10 PRINT CHR$(4);"PR#1 " 
20 FOR I = 1 TO 6 
30 PRINT CHR$( 2 7);CHR$( 114) 
40 NEXT I 

50 PRINT CHR$(4);"PR#0" 
If you're using a word processor, insert six 
"ESC r" combinations to reverse your paper feed. 



Vulcan Logic 

xi7then i use the quit option 

11/ from any Apple II software to get 
T ¥ back to the Finder on my IIgs (which 
is equipped with an Applied Engineering 
-Vulcan 40-megabyte drive), I receive the 
error message EXPRESSWAD ERROR: 
114D. It used to work correctly, but I 
messed up somewhere. Can you help me? 
Harold Miller 
Valley Stream. NY 

The problem could be your Applied Engi- 
neering utilities. Older versions won't work 
under Apple's System Disk 5.0.4. Ifyou think this 
is the case, contact Applied Engineering at PO. 



AppleWorks Clinic 

By Claris Corporation and the National AppleWorks Users Group 



Hide and Seek 



Help! I deleted an AppleWorks file from 
a disk that contained my term paper. Is 
there any way to get it back? 

There's a good chance you can recover 
the deleted file, particularly ifyou stopped 
using the disk as soon as you deleted it. 
ProDOS, the operating system that 
manages the disk drives for AppleWorks, 
doesn't actually delete a file from the disk; 
it marks the file as deleted in the disk 
catalog and releases the space on the disk. 
The system overwrites the space used by 
that file with newer data eventually, but 
until then you can recover the file. 



Copy 11+ offers an "undelete" function 
[$33.95; Central Pt. Software, 15220 
NW Greenbrier Parkway, Beaverton, OR 
97006, 503-690-8090]. Just boot it up, 
select Undelete from the main menu, and 
follow the prompts to display a list of all 
deleted files still in the catalog. Select 
the file you want to recover and the pro- 
gram reverses the entry in the disk cata- 
log. ProDOS will read the file once again, 

Next, boot up AppleWorks and try to load 
the file onto the desktop. If the file is 
intact it will load as if nothing happened. If 
it doesn't, tell AppleWorks you want to 
create a new word-processing file from a 
text (ASCII) file, load the file onto the desktop, 
and clean it up. Press Open apple-S to save. 



Disappearing Database 

I wasn't able to load an AppleWorks 
GS database file onto the desktop 
recently. Fortunately, I had a backup. Is 
there any way to recover the damaged 
file if that occurs again? 

Congratulations for keeping a backup! 
There's no insurance quite as good as 
having another copy of your work. 

Recovering damaged AppleWorks GS 
[AWGSD files depends on the extent and 
nature of the damage. You have little hope 
of recovering files that are damaged 
internally — that is, files with damaged 
headers or data. We know of no program 



20 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



Box 5100, CarrolUon, TX 75011, (214)241- 
6060, Moreiii^ 

corrupt. Try using the System Tools disk for 
Version5, OAMmMst^Mee^^ 
Thanks to Floyd 'Z^^-mdJim/Marmoi^ Jbp, 
their help answering this question. 

Is It Full or Not? 

I'M TRYING TO CONVERT FILES 
ftxrni a DOS 3.3 5.25-inch floppy disk to 
a newly formatted ProDOS 3. 5 -inch 
disk. The process fails with a message 
telling me that the 3.5-inch disk is full — 
but there are still files left on the 5.25- 
inch disk. How can this be? An empty 
800K 3.5-inch disk should be large enough 
to hold everything on the 5 .25-inch disk. 

John Sackstt 
Dayton, OH 

Information is stored oruany ProDOS disk in 
5 12-byte blocks. On a 3.5-inch disk, blocks 2 
through 5 contain the root directory for the disk. 
Each fUe entry on any ProDOS disk requires 39 
bytes, so a directory block can hold 13 entries. 
(The extra 5 bytes per block are used for system 
purposes.) If you multiply this figure by four, the 
entire root directory can only hold 52 entries. 
The first entry has information regarding the 
disk volume, such as its name, leaving 51 
entries, each of which can be used to identify 
a file or d subdirectory name . 



Go back to your 5. 2 5 -inch disk. Because 
ProDOS wasn't designed to provide extension of 
the root blocks beyond the first four, I'll wager 
that a CATALOG will show more than 51 files. 

The solution f Divide the information on your 
DOS 3.3 into subdirectories; ProDOS will extend 
subdirectories automatically as they expand. 

Laser UDC 

I HAVE AN APPLE He WITH TWO AMR 
3. 5 -inch disk drives and one DuoDisk 
drive. Utilizing the UDC card from the 
Laser computer in slot 5, how can I get 
AppleWforks to recognize all four dr ives? 

Emmett Woodward 
Oregon, Wl 

If you first daisychain the two AMR drives to 
the computer, then daisychain the 5.25 J inch disks 
at the end, ApphWorks should recognize the chain. 

For this procedure to work, though, you need 
ROM version 4.0 or later in the Universal 
Disk Controller card (UDC). lb d£termine what 



you hme, fm wp BASIC to obtain its famous J 
, prompt character. Enter CALL -151 and hit 
the return key. The ROM monitor system 
announces iudfwilh the* prompt. 

Now enter $C515, where the second hex 
digit is the slot number for the UDC — in your 
case, slot 5. If you see the digits 4030, you 
have the latest ROM version. If you see an 
older version, such as version 3, or a date, 
your controller won't support the daisychain I 
described. (To receive an updated version of 
ROM, contact Laser Computer, Inc., at 800 
North Church Street, Lake Zurich, IL 60047, 
708-540-5022.) If you have version 4.0 and 
this work-around still doesn't Work, you have a 
hardware problem that requires the assistance of 
a dealer or a repair service. 

Apple Clinic is a forum for answering your 
questions About Apple II hardware and soft- 
ware. Address your correspondence to Apple 
Clinic, inCwer/A+, 80 Elm Street, Peterbor- 
ough, NH 03458. Because of the volume of 
letters, most won't appear in print, but we'll 
try to respond if you enclose a sfxf-addressed, 
stamped envelope. 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT TO READERS 



Breakthrough For AppleWorks Users! 

The best integrated PC package yet! 

Northvale, NJ 

Remarkable Technologies announces a 
breakthrough product which delivers 
AppleWorks power on an IBM PC or 
compatible. SuperWorks allows AppleWorks 
users to step up to a PC along with all their 



AppleWorks files, utilizing AppleWorks 
work-alike integrated software. 




SuperWorks Features Screen 

New features provide complete and 
full integration of all its capabilities 
including; spreadsheet (with 3-D 
capability), database (the easiest to use 
and one of the most powerful anywhere), 
word processing (a dynamic and full 
capability communications package) plus 



unlimited keystroke macro capability. It 
takes only 160K in RAM. In addition, 
SuperWorks allows you to work with 
your AppleWorks file on an IBM PC. 

As a special introductory offer to 
inCider readers, SuperWorks will be 
made available at the special price of 
$199.00 (plus $5.00 for shipping and 
handling). SuperWorks has a regular 
retail price of $400.00. Send your check 
or credit card information with order form 
below to Remarkable Technologies, 245 
Pegasus Avenue, Dept. SW, Northvale, 
NJ 07647. Telephone: 201-784-0900. 
Fax: 201-767-7463 

PAYMENT MUST ACCOMPANY THIS ORDER 

. sws 

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CARD NUMBER 

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Circle 33 on Reader Service Card. 



that can rebuild the internal structure 
of damaged AWGS files. 

The odds are better if the problem 
is a bad disk or a damaged GS/OS 
directory. With Vitesse's Salvation- 
Deliverance you can reconstruct bad or 
damaged directories and volume bit 
maps [$49.95; 1 3909 Amar Road, La 
Puente, CA 91746, 81 B-81 3-1270). 

Another option is Glen Bredon's 
ProSel-16, an extensive collection of 
GS/OS utilities that recover files you 
can't access because of damaged 
GS/OS directories or disks [$89,95; 
distributed by Charlie's Apple Seeds, 
9081 Hadley Place, San Diego CA 
92126, 619-452-12971 



August 1991 • mCider/A+ * 21 



Audio Animator unleashes 
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Compute at Warp speed with TransWarp GS. 
More than doubles processing speed and it's 
upgradable. $299 w/8K Cache and $399 
w/32K Cache 




External mixer (included with 
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fingertips. 





PC Transporter lets your Hgs run IBM's 
MS-DOS. Shop both sides of the software aisles. 
$349 



Our lies Power Supply gives 
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Vulcan internal hard disk replaces the 
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a lot of love and a little help from Applied Engineering. 



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For ten years, Applied Engineering has set the Apple II industry standard for quality and reliability. We do it with top-notch 
tech support, innovative new products and a commitment to design and build the best products possible. To receive your 
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The AE 3-5" Disk Drives are 
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The Apple enhancement experts. 



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Bridging the gap 




Create new loyalty between Apple IlGSes 
and Macs with System 7.0. 



By GREGG KEIZER 

THE MAC IS DEAD. LONG LIVE THE 
Mac. No, the Crown of England hasn't 
just been passed on. It's something 
more important, at least to Macintosh 
users. System 7.0, the long-awaited 
revision to the Macintosh's operating- 
system software, has Finally succeeded 
to the throne of the Macintosh empire. 

Though not revolutionary in its 
changes, System 7.0 is 
certainly the most 
important — and the 
most ; JaEzling — 
upgrade since the Mac's 
introduction in 1 984. 
From its sharp TrueType 
font technology to its 
easier-to-use Finder, 
System 7.0 packs a 
wallop. It makes most 
Macs more powerful 
and easier to use, and 
for the foreseeable 
future guarantees the 
Macintosh's spot as 
king of the graphical 
computers. And then, 
strangely enough, System 
7.0 will have an immed- 
iate impact wherever 
Apple lis and Mac- 
intoshes work together. 

One of the most effec- 




f 



^1/ \l^r 



7 // \\ X 



tive ways to mix Apple lis and Macs is with 
an AppleTalk network. By linking Apple 
IIgs and Mac computers with LocalTalk 
cabling, collections of machines can share 
printers and other peripherals, and most 
importantly, share files. Until System 7.0, 
a file-sharing AppleTalk network 
demanded that you dedicate a Mac as a 
file server — the computer and hard-disk 
drive combination that stores common files 
and runs AppleShare, the network soft- 
ware. But because you 
can't use the Mac file 
server for anything but 
running the network, 
AppleTalk networks are 
uneconomical for many 
schools and small busU 
nesses, and for virtually 
every home or home office. 
System 7.0 changes 
that. Its built-in file- 
sharing abilities let 
you bridge the gap 
without setting aside a 
Mac Here's an overview 
of how it functions. 
Grab a Macintosh. Any 
Mac that has 2 megabytes 
of RAM and a hard- 
w disk drive will do. 
An LC works well, 
but additional mem- 
ory always helps make 
operations run more 



quickly. With System 7.0 running on the 
Mac, you simply choose a folder (or use 
the File menu to create a New Folder) that 
you want to share with others on the net- 
work, then select Sharing from the File 
menu. Up pops a dialog box, in which 
you click on Share this item and its contents 
and set access privileges, much as you do 
when you set up an AppleShare file server. 
(See Figure 1.) You can, for instance, let 
some users only view files while you let 
others modify them. 

When you're finished setting up this 
shared folder, it shows up as an Apple- 
Share volume or server on any computer 
you've designated with privileges. At 
another Mac, the folder shows on the 
AppleShare list in the Chooser, once you've 
clicked on both the AppleShare icon and 
the name of your file server, and followed 
the on-screen prompts. From an Apple 
IIgs,' the folder appears when you click 
on the AppleShare icon in the Control 
Panel. Picking the folder from either list 
puts a new AppleShare icon on the desk- 
top; double-click on the icon and it opens 
to show the contents of the folder (assuauftg 
privileges have been set to let you see 
those files). You're in business. 

Let's take a simple example. Say your 
students write with AppleWorks Classic 
on two Apple IlGSes in the room. You 
have a Macintosh LC on your desk and 
pound out reports, notes, and assign- 
ments with Mac Write II. Through the 
magic of System 7.0 and MacWrite II's 
XTND (extended-command) translators, 
you can swap and share files with your 
students easily. (This technology lets you 
move a formatted AppleWorks document 
to the Mac — no ASCII step in between 
— and open it directly in MacWrite II, 
with all your tabs, underlines, and other 
settings preserved.) 

Make two folders on your LC (one marked 
In, another marked Out), designate both as 
shared folders (choose Sharing in the Hie 
menu), and set the privileges so that all your 



24 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



Illustration • Elizabeth V Auer 



UPDATE: SON OF PRINTER POLYGAMY 

AppleWorks never looked so good for so little. That's what you'll think the first 
time you push an AppleWorks ward-processing, database, or spreadsheet file 
through a laser printer. Though they may not be filled with fancy fonts, laser-printed 
AppleWorks documents are clear and sharp. No more blocky characters faded by 
worn-out ribbons. 

May's Bridging the Gap ["Printer Polygamy," p. 6B) walked you through some 
Macintosh and IIgs printer-sharing solutions. PostScript printers make the most 
sense when you're mixing these two machines and using llGS-specific software 
that supports PostScript. But if you're comfortable with AppleWorks Classic, you 
don't have to do without laser printing, nor do you have to spring for an expensive 
PostScript-compatible printer. 

Hewlett-Packard's LaserJet IIP — an affordable laser printer that some analysts 
predict will sell for as little as $75Q this summer — works well with AppleWorks 
Classic ($1295; Hewlett-Packard. 19310 Pruneridge Avenue, Cupertino, CA 95041, 
800-752-0900], All you need is HPII.SEG.ER.SHK, a public-domain printer driver for 
AppleWorks 3.0. Available in America Online's AppleWorks software library [under New 
Files], this freeware program adds the IIP to your list of passible print destinations. 

Installing HPII.SEG.ER.SHK takes only a few minutes. After you've expanded the 
squeezed file with Shrink-lt, America Online's default compression utility for the 
Apple II, just copy the file SEG.ER to your AppleWorks disk, or to the appropriate 
folder if you're working with a hard-disk drive. Run AppleWorks, call up a docu- 
ment, and press Open apple-R Your new printer choice should appear 
as HPII.LASER 

Calling on the HP's internal fonts, orientation, and styles [Courier 1_0- and 
12-p oint and Line Printer 8.5-point ; landscape or portrait; normal, italics, and 
boldface] is as easy as inserting various CI and SC commands in the document. 
You can also access several other fonts, including a proportionally spaced Times 
Roman font, if you have the appropriate optional cartridge plugged into the IIP 

With the IIP laser printer and this new driver, you can squeeze more on an Apple- 
Works spreadsheet page (by using smaller type and printing in landscape mode], 
produce envelopes (though the IIP tends to wrinkle the envelope and/or glue shut 
its flap), and, of course, generate crisp-looking letters, reports, and other word- 
processing documents. Remember, too, that you can use the IIP with the Mac- 
intosh after you add a third-party package of printer drivers, such as Seven Hills 
Software's Independence [$39.95; 2310 Oxford Road, Tallahassee, FL 32304- 
3930, 904-575-0566) or Vitesse's Harmonie [$49.35; 13909 Amar Road, La 
Puente, CA 91746, 818-813-1270). It's just another way to bridge the printer 
gap when you have more than one machine on your desktop. — G.K. 



students have access. Then create folders 
within the Out folder for every student in 
your class and set the privileges so that each 
child has access to his or her own document 
only. As soon as a student finishes an 
assignment, he or she calls up the Control 
Panel, selects the In folder from the list of 
AppleShare volumes, double-clicks on the 
resulting desktop icon to open the folder, 
and copies the AppleWorks file by dragging 
it to the folder. At the end of each class, you 
open the In folder on your LC and move the 
files to your MacWrite II folder. 

To review, comment, or change the 
student's work, fire up MacWrite II, select 
the AppleWorks translator from the list in 
the Open File dialog box (figure 2), and 
open the appropriate AppleWorks file. 
MacWrite IPs XTND translator converts the 
file to MacWrite U format automatical ly and 
retains the original formatting. You're liee to 
comment or suggest changes to the assign- 
ment. Once through, you simply save the 
document as an AppleWorks file by selecting 
AppleWorks 2.0 from the Save As dialog box, 
and move it to the Out folder. 

The next day, students sit down at the 
IIgs and log onto the file server by click- 
ing on the AppleShare icon in the Control 
Panel. Then they access and open the Out 
folder and their personal folders from your 
LC's hard-disk drive, and drag their work 
from those folders to their personal 3.5- 
inch disks. Now they can run AppleWorks, 
load the file, and see the changes and com- 
ments you've made. Hie entire process of 
accessing AppleShare volumes, opening 
folders, and transferring files takes only a 
little more rime than it does to describe. And 
as in an AppleShare-eqiiipped network no 
outside translation utility — not even Apple 
FUe Exchange, for instance — is necessary. 

Your classroom network operates trans- 
parently while you have complete control 
of your Macintosh LC. Thanks to System 
7.0, you have an economical network that 
lets you use the Mac while students send 
and retrieve files. The only price you pay 
is a slight slowing of your Mac when others 
get to its hard-disk drive. 

LAUNCH AWAY 

Wait! There's morel System 7.0 does 
more than just share files. With Apple- 
Share-aware software, it can also turn your 
Mac into a launching pad for Apple II 



programs such as AppleWorks GS and 
HyperCard GS. Like a dedicated file server, 
System 7.0 lets you copy appropriate 
applications to a shared folder on a Mac's 
hard-disk drive via the network, then run 
those programs from your Apple II. 

In another make-believe classroom, 
where an LC sits on the teacher's desk and 
three IIgs machines keep the kids 
company, three copies of AppleWorks GS 
get fed to IIgs 3.5-inch drives. There's 
gotta be a better way. 

There is. Copy the AppleWorks GS files 
— using the network connection already 
established — to the LC's shared folder. 
Now, with the shared folder still on the 
IIgs desktop as an AppleShare icon, 



double-dick on the AppleWorks GS icon. 
Half a minute later (not blazingly fast, but 
still quicker than if you were running from 
floppies), the AppleWorks GS screen 
appears on the GS. You can write, paint, 
publish, crunch numbers, and find infor- 
mation to your heart's content. 

HyperCard GS works with System 7.0 Y 
shared folders, too. That's a big plus for 
GS owners who can't drop a hard-disk 
drive next to each IIgs. HyperCard GS, 
which needs either a network or hard- 
disk drive, runs perfectly fine from a 
System 7.0 Mac. 

Remember, though, that you must still 
obey the copyright laws when you're 
running Apple II software from a Mac- 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 25 



Bridging the gap 



intosh. If you have three IlGSes in the class, 
you'll need three copies of AppleWorks 
GS to avoid software piracy. (You put only 
one copy on the Mac, of course.) Check 
with the publisher of your favorite Apple 
II software for information on its Apple- 
Share-awareness, as well as for details on 
possible site licenses or network packs. 

■ . - * 
KEEP (APPLE)SHARING 

System 7.0 and its file-sharing feature 
won't eliminate AppleShare and dedicated 
file servers managing dozens of machines. 
In fact, long sessions with System 7.0 
turned up a major gaffe: You can't share 
from an Apple He. 

Even when equipped with an Apple II 
Workstation card, my lab's He refused to 
recognize a Macintosh running System 7.0 
as a file server. Well, almost refused to 
recognize it. 

As long as I logged on from the He 
with the same user name and password as 
the Macintosh' s owner, everyt h ing 
worked fine. (AppleShare, which System 
7.0's file sharing mimics in many ways, 
requires that a server be tagged with an 
owner, usually the network administra- 
tor.) The entire contents of the Mac's 
hard disk were available to the He, and I 
could copy files from Mac to He and 
back. But all attempts to log on with 
other user names — names registered 
with the Mac's System 7.0, of course — 
met with utter failure. The AppleShare 
lie Workstation software simply wouldn't 
recognize the Mac as a file server. 

Because you can't connect to a System 
7.0 Macintosh from an Apple He, except 
by logging on as the Mac's owner, there's 
no way to restrict access to a limited 
number of files. No teacher will want to 
give all his or her students free run of the 
Mac's hard disk, which will probably 
contain, among other things, grades and 
records of every member of the class. 
Plainly put, System 7.0 and Apple lies 
don't mix. 

That's just one reason System 7.0 doesn't 
make AppleShare obsolete. Another is 
System 7.0's limit on the number of 
machines that can access a folder-sharing 
Mae. Although there's no limit to the 
number of computers you can hook up to 
the network, only ten can connect to a 



shared folder at a time. (As soon as one 
user drags the AppleShare icon off the 
desktop, another user can access the folder.) 
And because a Mac running System 7.0 
can slow to a crawl when several linked 
computers are accessing its hard-disk drive 
at the same time (especially when it's 
launching Apple software), you may find 
the Macintosh all but unusable during 
peak sharing periods. But for small group 
connections, economical file sharing, and 
limited application launching, System 7.0 
is great news for anyone mixing and 
matching Apple Ilcses and Macs. 

THE HOME SHARING NETWORK 

Be the first on your block to network 
your home. System 7.0 solves the bridg- 
ing problem neatly for anyone who has 



f r it File Edit uiem LnlitH Special 



# 




Figure 1. Set access privileges in 
System 7.0's dialog box. 



fllB) Si-Hi M'JW. Ktn.i1 jy-illiii;; 



Bridging the Cap.Bugutt ICunuer 



revision' 
throne <l 
Th 

important 
vm fr. 
System 



QflppleUJortsEi 



H [ Cancel 



Stiouj flpplelllmkl j 



u i 1 'ihVTr -j.lMih— in i i- ft M ' | i i'ii -t Hi 
graphical computers. JSnd strangely enough. System 7.0 will tevs an 
Immediate impact wherever Apple lis and Macs work together. 



ZEE 



Figure 2. System 7.0 lets you open 
AppleWorks file in Mac Write II. 



an 



both an Apple IlGS and a Macintosh in 
the same house. 

Assuming you already have the Mac 
and IIgs, your only extra expense is a 
pair of LocalTalk Connector Kits. If you 
have the machines in different rooms — 
the lies in the kid's room and the Mac in 
your home office or den — use Farallon's 



PhoneNet instead. PhoneNet uses exist- 
ing phone wiring to route LocalTalk 
signals between machines, avoiding messy 
cables through floors or walls. 

While you're hooking up the Apple IlGS 
and Mac, make sure you include your 
printer in the net. Whether it's an 
Image Writer II or a low-cost PostScript 
laser printer, either machine can call on it 
when it's involved with AppleTalk. 

System 7.0 and AppleTalk let your 
Macintosh stay a Macintosh, and your 
Apple IIgs remain an Apple lies. There's 
no mixing of applications, only a sharing 
of files, information, and data. But 
because that's what most people want 
from a network, who's complaining? 

NOT JUST FOR SHARING 

Although it's a godsend for small-scale 
file sharing, System 7.0's mission isn't to 
make Apple IlGS users happy. But it will 
put a smile on any Mac owner's face. 

Among its new features are such things 
as TrueType, Apple's scalable display- and 
print-font technology. (Instead of storing 
pictures of letters in various type sixes, this 
format uses the system file to store the 
directions for drawing each letter.) You'll 
see smooth type both on screen and on 
paper, in sizes from one to 32,786 points. 
No more jagged characters on the moni- 
tor, and you get near-laser-quality output 
even on an ImageWriter II. 

Taking a page from the Apple IIgs, the 
Mac now boasts a simplified font and 
desk-accessory installation, whereby you 
simply drag icons into the System folder 
to add new fonts and DAs. And once 
application developers begin pumping 
out System 7.0-friendly software, you'll 
be able to take advantage of Apple's 
publish-and-subscribe, an automatic 
cut-and-paste feature in which copied 
graphics or text is updated in linked doc- 
uments. You can share a document with 
others, and when you make changes to 
your original, the duplicates change, too. 

There's more to System 7.0, lots more. 
Alms let you access a file or application from 
more than one place on your hard-disk 
drive. Alias icons act like immature pointers 
to the real document or application file, so 
that when you click on an alias, it's as if you 
clicked on the real thing. You can create an 



26 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



alias to represent logging onto an Apple- 
Share volume or accessing another Mac's 
hard-disk drive, simplifying complex 
operations to a single mouse click. Further 
down the road is something called inter- 
application communication (IAC), which will 
let developers create ways for their 
programs to share information with, and 
even work alongside, other applications. 

To top it all off, System 7.0 is a bargain. 
As of July 1, every Mac capable of run- 
ning System 7.0 will have it pre-installed 
on the hard-disk drive before it leaves the 
factory. Earlier Macs can upgrade to 
System 7.0 in several ways. The least 
expensive means a trip to a user group or 
dealer, where you copy the System's eight 
disks onto your own floppies. 

On-line services will also post 7.0 for 
downloading, though the connect cost will 
be prohibitive. The smartest method 
is certainly to plunk down $99 for the 
Personal Upgrade Kit, which includes 
the software and two reference manuals. 
With all its new features, System 7.0 may 
take some time to learn, and the docu- 
mentation will help. 

Although Senior Editor Paul Statt has 
said in What's New that the current 
generation of Mac users doesn't need 
System 7.0 (see July 1991, p. 14), I 
disagree. Because of its ability to share 
files with Apple IlGSes, its TrueType font 
technology, and its alias and publish- 
and-subscribe features, I think if you own 
a Mac, you need System 7.0. □ 



PRODUCT INFORMATION 

AppleWorks 3.0, $249 

AppleWorks GS, $299 

MaeWrite II, $249 

Claris Corporation 

5201 Patrick Henry Drive 

Santa Clara, CA 95052-8 168 

(408) 727-8227 

HyperCard Hgs, $99 

LocalTalk Connector Kit, $75 

System 7.0 Personal Upgrade Kit, $99 

Apple Computer, Inc. 
20525 Mariani Avenue 
Cupertino, CA 95014 
(800) 776-2333 
(408) 974-1010 

PhoneNet 

Farrafon Computing 
2000 Powell Street 
Emeryville, CA 94B08 
(415) 596-9100 
$75/connector box 




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DB 25 A/B $24.95 

DB 25 A/B/C/D $34.95 

Parallel A/B $24.95 

Parallel A/B/C/D $34.95 



Extended 80 Column Card 
With 64K for Apple He 

100% Appleworks 
Compatible 

5 Year Warranty 



p [i m 



SUPER SERIAL CARD 
100% Apple Compatible 
5 Year Warranty $48.95 



Graphics Printer Card w/Cable 
For Apple 11+ & He 

Parallel 

$44.95 



DISKETTE STORAGE W/Lock 

5% Holds 70 Disks $6.95 

5y 4 Holds 100 Disks $8.95 

5*4 Holds 120 Disks $10.95 

3% Holds 100 Disks $8.95 



11+ OWNERS 

16KCard $34.95 

128KCard $64.95 

80 Column Card $48.95 

Plus Works $49.00 

5 Year Warranty 



Prices subject to change without notice. 



UNIVERSAL DISK CONTROLLER 
Run 800K Disk Drives 
on your 11+ and He 
$64.95 



800K DISK DRIVE 3% 
for II+, He, MAC, LASER 128 
$179.00 



Disk Controller Card 
For Apple II, 11+ & He 
5 Year Warranty 



J38 Bet 



CPM Card $34.95 

He Numeric Keypad $34.95 

11+ & He RF Modulator $15.95 



Cooling Fan for Apple 11+ & He 
With Surge Surpressor $26.95 



Cooling Fan 

For 
Apple HGS 



No 
Noise 
Interference 



ACCESSORIES 

Mouse Pad $4.95 

Disk Notcher $4.50 

Disk Clean 5% $4.00 

Disk Clean 3% $4.00 

Mouse Pocket $4.95 

Amber Monitor $99.00 



Replacement 
He Keyboard 
$55.00 



7 Amp. Pwr, Supply 
II, 11+ & lie 
$49.00 



Joystick for Apple He, lie, 
IIC+&IIGS 

With Fire Button 
Same as Mach III 




Cables From $9.95 

He to Modem lie to Modem 
He to IMG I lie to IMG II 

He to IMG H Others 
Talk & Data Kits 
SCSI Cables 



GS Power Supply 
7 Amp. 



m 



& 0^ VISA & MASTERCARD - NO EXTRA CHARGE DEALER PRICING O * & 
Shipping Most Items $6.00 / Drives $8.00 / C.O.D. + $4.00 



We carry only the 
Highest Quality products for 
your Apple. 
That's why we are 
the LARGEST 
and 
tike BEST! 



MEMORY PLUS DISTRIBUTORS, INC. 

505 South 48th Street, Suite #104 
Tempe, Arizona 85281 

(602) 820-8819 
FAX# (602) 968-3211 

Serving Apple Users Since 1983 



'% 

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. *" 
M.S.T. 
Mon - Fri. 

University & School P.O. 
Accepted 



20% Restocking charge 
on returned items 



Circle 248 on Reader Service Card. 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 27 



Programs, Peripherals, Phenomenal Prices for Apple & Mac 



ACCELERATORS RAMCARDS 

Apple Computer Full Line 

\nple He Enhancement Kit 58. 

Apple He Extended SO Col. Card 89. 

Applied Engineering 

GS-Ram III IMG 145. 

PC Transporter (768K) 257. 

PC Transporter Installation Kit GS 39. 

PC Transporter Installation Kit lie 32. 

RamWorks ill 512K 159. 

Ram Works 111 IMG 227. 

Trans Warp Accelerator (GS) 246. 

Trans Warp Original Accelerator 96. 

7-RamUltra2 512K :.227. 

Z-Ram Ultra 2 IMG 289. 

Z-Ram Ultra 3 IMG 299. 

Chips-Chips Set 256K 120 or 150m.... 19. 
Harris Labs GS Sauce Card "0" K (GS) . . 73. 

GS Sauce IMG 132. 

GS Sauce 2MG 199. 

GS Sauce 4MG 339. 

Zip Technology Zip Chip 8 MHZ 139. 

Zip Chip Model 1600 (GS) 198. 

Zip Chip GSX+{9MHZ,'32K) 248. 

ACCESSORIES 

Apple Computer Apple Mouse lie 118. 

Disk Controller Card 41. 

Extended Keyboard ADB 175. 

Video Overlay Card 428. 

Mac Classic Modulars CALL 

I MB SIMMS 80 NS 59. 

Applied Engineering 

Audio Animator (GS) 163. 

Conserver (GS) 74. 

Conserver Cable (GS) 16. 

High Output Power Supply 74. 

I1GS Heavy Duty Power Supply 88. 

Sonic Blaster (GS) 95. 

CH Products Flight Stick 46. 

Mach HI Joystick 29. 

Kalmar 

Kalmar Roll Top 3.5 (holds 45) 14. 

Kensington, Inc. AntiGlare Filter GS ..37. 

Mouseway (Mouse Pad) 8. 

Turbo Mouse (Reg. or ADB) 119. 

Printer Muffler 80 47. 

System Saver (AP Platinum or Beige) 58. 

System Saver GS 65. 

Universal Printer Stand 19. 

Koala Technologies 

Koaia Pad Plus w/Graphics Exhibitor ..82. 

Kraft Floppy Disk Notcher 4. 

Maxell Maxell 3.5 DS, DD (10) 14. 

Maxell 5.25 DS/'DD 9. 

Mouse Systems 

Littlemouse APlus or ADB 79. 

MousTrak MousePad 7"x9" Size 7. 

MousePad 9"xll" Size 8. 

RC Systems Double Talk 183. 

Ribbons 

Image Writer Ribbons available in 
various colors 4. 

Image Writer 1 1-4 Color Ribbon 9. 

Image Writer Rainbow Pack 
(6 Colors) or (6 Black) 19. 

Sony Sony 3.5 DS, DD (10) 12. 

Street Electronics Echo II (AP & GS). .99. 

APPLE COMPATIBLE 
COMPUTERS 

Apple Computer 

1IGS Computer IMG CPU 799. 

Laser Computer Inc. 
Laser 128 800K 3,5"Drive 

w/Controller 199. 

Laser 128 Computer CALL 

Laser 128 Mouse 44, 

Laser 128 System w/ Color Monitor. . .CALL 
Laser RGB Monitor 215. 

Apple Computer GS/OS v5.0 .4 (GS). . .39. 

HyperCard II GS 79. 

Glenn Bredon 

Prosel 16 w/ manual 67. 

Central Point Software 

Copy II Plus v9.1 25. 

Vitesse, Inc. 

Salvation: Deliverance (GS) 29. 

Salvation: Exorcisor (GS) 29. 

Salvation: Backup (GS). , 29. 

Salvation: Renaissance (GS) .... 29. 

Salvation: Supreme Pack !08. 

Salvation: Wings (GS) 47. 

BUSINESS SOFTWARE 

Beagle Brothers AW v3.0 Companion . .24. 
Clip Art 1 (GS) 26. 



Beagle Bros. Desk Accessories (GS) . . .36. 

Beagle Write 45. 

Beagle Write Desk Accessories 

or Font Pack 1 or 2 26. 

Beagle Write Font Lib. 1 (GS) 31. 

Beagle Write Picture Manager 25. 

Beagle Write (GS) 57. 

Outliner for Apple works 3.0 41. 

Timeout Series CALL 

Big Red Software 

Labels, Labels, Labels 22. 

Broderbund 

Bank Street Writer Plus (A PorC+)... 47. 
Claris AppleWorks v3.0 168. 

Apple Works (GS)\ 1.1 198. 

Intuit Quicken v 1.0 37, 

Manzanita 

Business Works Bundle AP & GS (Sys. 

Manager, GjL, AjP, AjR, Inventory). . .258, 

BusinessWorks Payroll (AP&GS)... 109. 
Meca Software 

Managing Your Money 

v4.0 (AP&GS) 98. 

Milliken Publishing Medley (GS) 79. 

Nolo Press Will Maker v3.0 35. 

Seven Hills Software 

Graphicwriter III (GS) 69. 

Stone Edge 

DB Master Professional (AP&GS).. 179. 
Timeworks, Inc. Art Portfolio 4 in 1 ... 69. 

Graph It! 43. 

People, Places and Things, 
or Design Ideas 25. 

Publish-lt \3.0 (AP&GS) 73. 

WordPerfect Corp. 

WordPerfect (AP or GS) 104. 

COMMUNICATION SOFTWARE 

Applied Engineering ReadyLink 57. 

Beagle Brothers Point-to-Point 58. 

InSync Preterm 79. 

Softspoken Cross works 67. 

DISK DRIVES & HARD DISK 
SUB-SYSTEMS 

American Micro Research (Micro Sci) 

A.5 Half Height (11+ & HE) 129. 

A5 D Half Height 5.25" Drive 

(UGS Daisychain) 129. 

AMR 800k 1.44 (GS) 168. 

GS Partner: Quick 20,40,60 MB . . . CALL 
Apple Computer 

Apple 3.5 Drive (GS & C+) 315. 

Apple 3.5 Unidisk 294. 

High Speed DMA SCSI Card 105. 

Unidisk 3.5 Controller 58. 

Applied Engineering AE 3.5" Drive ... 208. 

3.5 1.6MB Disk Drive 249. 

AE 5.25" Drive 124. 

Controller Card for 3.5" Drive 

(lie or 11+) 69. 

Transdrive 360K Single Drive 184. 

Vulcan 20MB (AP or GS) 496. 

Vulcan 40MB (AP or GS) 638. 

Vulcan 60MB (AP or GS) 1284. 

CMS Enhancements 

20 MB w/ SCSI II card 459. 

30MBw/SCSIIIcard 492. 

SCSI Rom Upgrade 23. 

CV Technologies 

Ramfast SCSI Card w/256K Ram . . . 178. 
Laser Computer Inc. 

Laser 128 5.25 Disk Drive 88. 

Laser 800KB Drive 168. 

Laser 800KB Drive w/ controller 199. 

Universal Disk Controller 37. 

EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE 

A.E.C. Spanish Vocabulary 

or Spanish Grammer 16. 

Return of the Dinosaurs 28. 

Advanced Idea 

Audubon Wildlife Adventures: 

Grizzly Bears (5.25) 32. 

Grizzly BearsfGSJ 38. 

Whales (5.25) 32. 

Whales GS) 38. 

Stars & Planets TGS; 27. 

Barron's 

Computer SAT Revised Version 31. 

Britannica 

Algebra 1: 1st & 2nd Semester 46. 

Algebra 1: 1st or 2nd Semester 27. 

Designasaurus or Revolution (3.5) 27. 

Spellicopter '. 22. 

Broderbund Geometry (3.5) 49. 

McGee or Katie's Farm (3.5) 24. 

McGee Fun at the Fair (3.5) 24. 

Playroom 24. 



Science Tool Kit Module I or II 25. 

Science Tool Kit Master Module 49. 

Type! 17. 

Carmen Sandiego Series CALL 

Davidson & Associates 

Alge-Blaster Plus (AP or GS) 28. 

Math Blaster Plus (AP or GS) 28. 

Reading & Me (AP) 25. 

Math Blaster Mystery (AP or C+J 29, 

Talking Math & Me (GS) 

or Talking Reading & Me (GS) 29, 

Word Attack Plus (APorGS) 29. 

Grade Busters Corp. 

Grade Busters I, 2, 3 69, 

Learning Company 

Magic Spells (3.5 or 5.25) 

or Gertrudes Secrets (3.5) 25. 

Math Rabbit (3. J or 5.25) 24. 

Reader Rabbit (5.25) 24. 

Talking Reader Rabbit (3.5) 31. 

Think Quick (3.5 or 5.25) 

or Writer Rabbit (3.5 or 5.25) 29. 

Writing and Publishing 

Center (3.5 or 5.25) 31. 

MECC 

Calendar Crafter Home Edition (3.5) . .31. 
Number Munchers or Word Munchers 

(3.5 or 5.25) 23. 

Oregon Trail (3.5 or 5.25) 24. 

Paint with Words (5.25) 24. 

USA Geograph (3.5) 

or World Geograph (3.5) 49. 

Milliken Publishing 

The Story Teller (GS only) 27. 

Mindscape Crossword Magic 33, 

Orange Cherry Full Line 38 ea. 

Queue Kid writer (5. 2 5) 25. 

Kidwriter Gold Edition (3.5) 39. 

Sensible Software 

Report Card \\ (AP&GS) 37. 

Sensible Grammar (AP & GS) 59. 

Simon & Schuster 

Typing Tutor IV (AP or GS) 26. 

Software Toolworks 

Mavis Beacon Typing (3.5) 32. 

Terrapin Logo Plus 75. 

Weekly Reader/ Optimum 

StickyBear Series: 

Full Line Available CALL 

ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE 

Accolade 

4th & Inches (GS) or Fastbreak 15. 

Bubble Ghost (GS) 15. 

California 

or European Challenge (GS) 15. 

Jack Nicklaus Series CALL 

Test Drive II (GS) 28. 

Third Courier (GS) 30. 

Artworx Bridge 6.0 (APorGS) 25. 

Britannica Gnarly Golf (GS) 17. 

Great Western Shoot-Out (GS) 17. 

JigSaw fGS; 17, 

Laser Force (GS) 17. 

Task Force (GS; 23. 

Broderbund Jam Sessions (GS) 30. 

VCR Companion 30. 

Prince of Persia 22. 

Byte Works Ugly Duckling (GS) 24. 

California Dreams Block Out (GS) ... .23. 

Tunnels of Armageddon (GS) 15. 

Vegas Gambler (GS) 15. 

Casady & Greene Crystal Quest (GS) . . 19. 
Compu-Teach Once Upon a Time . . CALL 

See the U.S. A 26. 

Electronic Arts 

Bards Tale I or Ul(AP) 14. 

John Madden Football 31. 

FTL Dungeon Master (GS) 23. 

Leisure Genius Clue, Risk, or Scrabble . ,26. 

Lucasfilm Games Maniac Mansion 15. 

Pipe Dream 17, 

Micro League Sports 
Micro League Baseball 

w/ General Manager & Stats 24. 

Micro Revelations Xenocide (GS) 28. 

Microprose F-15 or Pirates 12. 

Mindscape 

Balance of Power 1990 (GS) 32. 

Hostage (GS) 15. 

Captain Blood (GS) 26. 

New World Computing Kings Bounty . .26. 

Might & Magic II 32. 

Origin Systems Ultima IV, Ultima V ... 37. 
Ultima Trilogy (I, II & III) 37. 



Wind Walker (GS) 25. 

Ready Soft Space Ace (GS) 33. 

Sierra On-LineSilpheed (GS) 21. 

Sir-Tech Software 

Wizardry Trilogy (includes I, If, III) . .35. 
Software Toolworks 

Chessmaster 2100 (GS) 33. 

Life and Death (GS) 33. 

Spectrum Holobyte 

Solitaire Royale (GS) 22. 

Tetris (AP & GS) 23. 

Strategic Simulations 

AD&D Champions Krynn 32. 

AD&D Pool of Radiance 30, 

Curse of the Azure Bond (GS) 33, 

War of Lance 26. 

SSG Halls of Montezuma (GS) 29. 

Pazer Battles (GS) 32. 

Reach for the Stars (GS) 28. 

Victory Software 

2088: The Cryllan Mission: 

The Second Scenario 35. 

2088: The Cryllan Mission (GS) 35. 

GRAPHICS PACKAGES 

Abracadata 

Architecture Library 1, 2, 3 or 4 
(APorGS) 19. 

Design Your Own Home Series .... CALL 
Baudville 816/ Paint 43. 

Award Maker Plus (AP & GS) 29. 

Beagle Bros. Beagle Draw (GS) 53. 

Platinum Paint (GS) 58. 

Berkeley Geoworks GEO Publish 58. 

GEOS V2.1, GEOCalc or GEOFile. . . .43. 
Big Red Software 

PS Lover's Utility Set (3.5) 26. 

Broderbund Bannermania (AP or GS) . .22. 
El Kassir Software COLOR + (GS) 42. 

Supergraphix H (GS) 52. 

Roger Wagner 

Graphic Exchange (GS) 29, 

Hyper Studio (GS) 82. 

Triad Venture 

GDL Graphic Disk Labeler (GS v2.0)..2Q. 
Cliptunes or Clipart Plus 20. 

MODEMS & MONITORS 

Apple Computer 

Apple Color Composite Monitor 309. 

Apple GS Color Monitor .454. 

Applied Engineering 

DataLink Express (ext. 2400) 158. 

DataLink Express w/MNP 5 197. 

DataLink Modem 2400B 

(Int AP&GS) 189. 

Supra Corporation SupraModem 2400 

(Hayes Compatible) 99. 

PRINTER INTERFACES 

Apple Computer 

Apple Super Serial Card 105. 

Orange Micro Grappler 9 pin 94. 

Grappler Plus (AP & GS) 79. 

Seven Hills Software 
Independence (GS) 

or Super Convert (GS) 23. 

SMT No Slot Clock 29. 

Thirdware 

Finger Print GSi verlll 83. 

Vitesse, Inc. Harmonie v2.0 (GS) 29. 

Xetec Inc. Superwriter 924 (GS, C+, C) 48. 

PRINTERS 

Apple Computer ImageWriter 11 455. 

Brother M 1109-AP Printer 179. 

Laser 190 A w/ Serial Interface 225. 

Seikosha 2000-AP 229. 

SCANNERS AND SOFTWARE 

Digital Vision ComputerEyes (GS). . . . 186. 

Thunderware Lightningscan (GS) 193. 

Thunderscan (AP & GS) 148. 

Vitesse, Inc. Quickie (AP&GS) 198. 

Quickie Update 79. 

WestCode Inwords 77. 

UTILITIES AND LANGUAGES 

ByteWorks 

ORCA C w/ Learn to Program 119. 

ORCA/ DeskTop (GS) 34. 

ORCA/C (GS) 79. 

ORCA/ Design Master (GS) 48. 

ORCA/ Pascal (GS) 79. 

ORCA/ Pascal w/ Learn to Program . . 119. 
ZedcorZBasic v4.21 39. 



1-800-832-3201 



We Sell More Than Anyone Else at the Lowest Prices. 



IIgs Products From 

Seven Hills 



GrapkicWHter III™ 
Superior desktop publishing, 1990 
inCider/A* Editors' Choice! 786K. 
Programs Plus Price $69 

Disk Access™ 
With features like Apple's 
Finder 1 " but it's available all 
the time as a new desk 
accessory! 128K. 

Programs Plus Price $27 

Font Factory GS™ 

Resizes fonts, creates special 

symbols, improves print quality 

from your programs, "...clearly 

the Cadillac of the field." — 

indder/A* 768K. 

Programs Plus Price $22 



SYSTEM 



Package Apple IIgs 

Ram 1 MB 
Monitor 12" Apple RGB 
Drive 3.5 Superdrive 
Harddrive 20 MB 

Keyboard/ Mouse 



PRICE $1999 



SYSTEM 



Package Mac Classic 

Ram 2 MB 
Monitor 9" Built In 
Drive 3.5 Superdrive 
Harddrive 40 MB 

Keyboard /Mouse 



PRICE $1330 



SYSTEM 



Package Mac LC 

Ram 2 MB 
Monitor 12" Apple RGB 
Drive 3.5 Superdrive 
Harddrive 40 MB 

Keyboard/Mouse 



PRICE $2399 



SYSTEM 



Package Mac Ilsi 

Ram 5 MB 
Monitor 13" Apple RGB 
Drive 3.5 Superdrive 
Harddrive 80 MB 

Keyboard / Mouse 



PRICE $4899 



SYSTEM 


Package 


Mac Ilsi 


Ram 


3 MB 


Monitor 


13" Apple RGB 


Drive 


3.5 Superdrive 


Harddrive 


80 MB 




Keyboard /Mouse 




Nubus Adapter 


PRICE 


$4399 



EDUCATION 



READER RABBIT 
MATH RABBIT 
KID PIX 
MIN. MAC PAINT 
TETRIS 
ADOBE TYPE MANAGER 
WHERE IS CARMEN 
SANDIEGO (CHOICE) 

VI REX 
MICROSOFT WORKS 



$499 



HOME 



VETTE 
TURBOTAX 
WILL MAKER 
SUPERPAINT 
TETRIS 
ADOBE TYPE MANAGER 
MY LABEL MAKER 
MY MAIL LIST 
VIREX 
MICROSOFT WORKS 



$599 




HOME DESIGNER'S DREAM 
Design Your Own Home Architec- 
ture, Landscape or Interiors by 
Abracadata. Now you can have a de- 
signer home with a most prestigious 
name: yours. Draw floor plans, eleva- 
tions, structural details the way you 
want them. Build interior and landfr 
cape designs with separate packages. 
All packages come with predrawn 
shapes. 

Programs Plus Price CALL 




FAX: 203/381-9043 
Inquiries: 203/378-3662 
Canada: 1/800/344-7753 
75 RESEARCH DRIVE 
STRATFORD, CT 06497 

1/800/832-3201 



BUSINESS 



QUARK EXPRESS 

QUICKEN 
HYPER CARD KIT 
ADOBE TYPE MANAGER 
VIREX 
MICROSOFT WORKS 



$860 



PRINTERS 



IMAGEWRITER II 

$499 

HP DESKWRTTER 
$699 

PERSONAL LASERWRITER 
$1025 
LASERWRITER II NT 

$3699 
LASERWRITER 11 NTX 
$4825 




QUICKIE - FIRST HAND 
SCANNER FOR YOUR 
APPLE II COMPUTER 
BY VITESSE, INC. 
Allows you to scan in true grey or 
B&W, 320/640 mode. Features in- 
clude Landscape/Portrait Scan, cut/ 
paste, open multiple windows, fat 
bits edit, resize, rotate, flip, direct 
print, save to six formats, NDA and 
MORE! ONLY scanner that's Inwords 
OCR Software compatible. 

Suggested Retail $299. 

Programs Plus Price $198. 



GRAPHICS 



MAC DRAW II 
MAC WRITE II 
PAINT n 
ADOBE TYPE MANAGER 
VIREX 
MICROSOFT WORKS 



$599 




TEXT SCANNING SOFTWARE 
InWords by WestCode is OCR soft- 
ware for the Apple He and IIgs. With 
InWords and a hand-held scanner, 
you can scan in virtually any printed 
information - articles, books, con- 
tacts, lesson plans, and more - into 
a file for your word processor, data 
base, spreadsheet or desktop pub- 
lishing program. Scans up to 500 
words per minute. Requires 512K 
and Quickie. 

Suggested Retail .J128 

Programs Phis Price ...,....,.477 



SCANNERS 



TH UNDERSC AN / WORKS 
$199 

COMPUTEREYES MAC II 
$320 

LIGHTING SCAN 400 
$357 




MODEMS 



DATALINK MAC PORTABLE 
$199 

ORCHID FAX MODEM MAC 
$377 

PROMODEM 2400 MINIFAX 
$209 

PROMODEM 9600 PLUS FAX 
$749 

SVJPERMODEM 2400 
eon 

377 



APPLE POLICIES 

L VISA, MASTERCARD or DISCOVER accepted. Your card is not charged until we 

ship. 

2. If we send a partial order, there's no second shipment charge. 

3. All shipments insured at no extra charge. No tax on out of state orders. 

4. COD maximum, £1,000 cash or certified check. 

5. No software refunds, 30 day return on defective items and will be replaced with same item 
only, no shipping, handling or insurance refunds. 

6. Absolutely no returns without prior authorization. 

7. Repackaging fees will be charged on items returned damaged or incomplete condition. 

8. Prices subject to change without notice. All items subject to availability. 

9. Corporate and school purchases accepted, based on credit approval. 
SHIPPING 

* We ship via UPS, DHL, US Mail. Saturday deliveries available. 

• Mail in orders, furnish telephone and/ or fax. 



Circle 128 an Reader Service Card. 



REVIEWS 




DESIGN YOUR OWN RAILROAD 



Abracadata, Ltd. 

P.O. Box 2440, Eugene, OR 97402, (BOO) 451-4871, or (503) 342-3030 

Computer-aided railroad-design program; 64K Apple II Plus or later with mouse, paddles, or joystick; 
1 -megabyte Macintosh version available later this year; printer optional; copy protection; $49.95 



For many Americans, railroads are a 
source of endless fascination. It's 
difficult not to be moved by the sight 
of a full-blown freight train in motion. The 
scream of the whistle and the clack of the 
wheels call up visions of a time when Amer- 
ica was headed west on steel rails, with a full 
tank of water and a boilerload of coal. 

If you've ever had the urge to don a rail- 
road engineer's cap and couple a tender (a 
vehicle for carrying fuel and water) to a 
locomotive, Design Your Own Railroad 



could make your dreams come true. Ride 
the rails as your train barrels through 
deep, cavernous tunnels or keep a watch- 
ful eye from the caboose as an old steam 
engine chugs over a precarious trestle 
bridge. Design Your Own Railroad has 
everything you need to stay on track. 

This software consists of two programs in 
one package. The first application 
provides computer-aided-design (CAD) 
tools for crafting precision model-railroad 
layouts. The second incorporates seven 



railroad games and lets you run trains 
over layouts you've created. You can 
monitor scheduling demands; complete 
reports; manage speed, direction, switch- 
ing, and coupling; and devise strategies to 
make the train arrive on time. 

The software requires only 64K to run, 
making it suitable for even an Apple II 
Plus. Because the model trains you put 
together navigate their routes on screen, 
rather than on a plywood layout, you save 
space as well as dollars. You don't need to 
purchase expensive track, rolling stock, or 
paraphernalia such as miniature figures, 
buildings, and landscaping. And with the 
action taking place on screen, you don't 
have to worry about maintenance chores 
such as cleaning track or repairing faulty 
electrical components. If you're really into 
plywood design, though, use this program 
to experiment with "what if" scenarios 
before you actually lay down any track. 

Model-train engineers can even create 
tracks with curves and switches, using metric 
or foot/inch measurements (in decimal 
notation). The program also features a 
library of 200 curve arcs customized to stan- 
dard train scales, such as Z, N, HO, S, O, 
and G, as well as bridges, scenery, over- 
passes, tunnels, and mountains. You can 
choose from more than six different area 
configurations with scales ranging from one- 
thirty-second of an inch = 1 foot to 1 inch = 1 
foot. When I used the HO gauge and the scale 
one-eighth inch - 1 foot to print the sample 
file, the layout measured 31 by 17Teet. 

Pull-down menus make layout design 
and construction easy, and there's a 
special tool that automatically places 
dimension lines (lines with arrows at each 
end and a measurement in the center) 
where you specify Cut, copy, and move 
functions erase or replicate selected por- 
tions of the screen. Text tools let you 
enter small or large horizontal and vertical 
type on screen to label buildings, specify 
industrial sites, or define geographical 



30 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



elements. You can draw arcs freehand with 
the sketch option; other drawing tools let 
you put personalized illustrations on cars- 
Destinations such as a slaughterhouse, a 
perfume factory, a logging mill, or a recy- 
cling plant complete your layout. Then you 
can select up to 16 cars from a rolling-stock 
library that includes passenger coaches, 
sleeping cars, hoppers, freight cars, early or 
late steam locomotives, diesel locomotives, 
and cabooses. Freight can include auto- 
mobiles, beer, canned goods, chemicals, 
textiles, wood chips, or any of 26 other choices. 
Define your cargo, hitch cars together, blow 
the whistle, and chug that choo-choo. 

While the train is running, you can 
couple, uncouple, switch cars, zoom in on a 
specific car for a close-up, keep track of all 
rolling stock on track, and lots more. The 
success of your railroad simulation depends 
in part on how you handle typical rail- 
roading tasks. This ability also helps the 
train reach its final destination on schedule. 

Don't expect to become a whiz-bang 
train engineer overnight. Abracadata refers 
to Design Your Own Railroad as a "rail- 
road simulation processor" — like a word 
processor, the program is a toolkit with 
endless potential, rather than an end in 
itself. Creating precision layouts that 
actually work takes patience and experience. 
Even the games require time to master. 

MORE BITE THAN CHOO 

This combination CAD-and-railroad- 
simulation package adds a new dimen- 
sion to conventional model railroading, 
but it's far from perfect. If IlGS users want 
to read the small print used in switch 
settings, they'll have to set display to 
monochrome; to keep trains on track at 
fast speeds, they'll need to configure 
system speed to normal. 

You can't install the program on your 
hard-disk drive, nor can you launch it from 
the GS/OS Finder because it uses a DOS 
3. 3 -compatible operating system called 
Diversi-DOS, which GS/OS doesn't recog- 
nize. This incompatibility wouldn't be so 
annoying if disk operations weren't so 
cumbersome. Boot the flip side of a Design 
Your Own Railroad 5.25 -inch program 
disk and a menu with three options 
(Operations, Select Rolling Stock Graphics, 
Catalog Data Disk) appears. If you choose 
the second item, Select Rolling Stock Graphics, 



the program requests that you type a file 
name. If you don't remember it, you'll 
have to exit the option and select the third 
choice, Catalog. By today's user-friendly 
computing standards, this command-line 
interface is simply archaic. 

While the software gives you an oppor- 
tunity to generate hardcopies of pictures 
and train layouts, the printer-installation 
interface is awkward. To install a new 
printer, you must scroll through a list of 25 
hardware options, remember the number 
that corresponds to your system's printer, 
then enter that number once the list has 
finished scrolling. You follow a similar 
installation procedure for the printer- 
interface card. Be sure to consult the chap- 
ter on printer installation in the manual, 
or you may end up configuring the printer 
settings incorrectly. 

The CAD program offers pull-down 
menus, but minimal keyboard command 
equivalents. Selecting Quit from the 
File menu returns you to the mouse- 
configuration screen Mouse or Paddles f 
(M/P), instead of truly exiting. Precision 
Layout designs have a flat, two-dimensional 
text-based appearance, instead of the 3-D 
look and feel you get with the Operations 
module. To save your Precision Layout 
designs and Operations layouts, you must 
have properly formatted data disks on 
hand; the software won't let you initialize 
disks within the program. Be sure to keep 
several formatted blank disks by your side, 
just in case. 

The 200-page manual has no index for 
quick reference, and novices may find the 
instructions difficult to follow because 
there are relatively few screen dumps to 
illustrate instructions outlined in the text. 
The manual does include a delightful 
collection of historical pictures and draw- 
ings, though. Finally, there's no description 
of the icons that run down the right side of 
the Operations screen. 

ALL ABOARD 

Design Your Own Railroad combines 
the fun of model-railroad operation with 
the convenience of an electronic desktop. 
You can use it as a toy to re-create a 
favorite layout you had as a kid, take 
advantage of its powerful design tools to 
simulate "what if" scenarios for an actual 
transit system, or snatch a few moments 



from your busy schedule to meet the chal- 
lenges of its many games. Once you get 
used to its awkward interface, this soft- 
ware may be the only excuse you need to 
get back into "training." 
Carol S. Holzberg, Ph.D. 
Shutesbury, MA 

TESSERAE 

Inline Design 
5 West Mountain Road, Sharon, CT 06069, 
(203) 364-0063 

Strategy board game; 1 -megabyte Macintosh 
Plus or later; color supported; $49.95 




Tesserae: The perfect escape. 



Arcade or strategy — is this the eter- 
nal question? Arcade-like action has 
a lot to offer. Fast-paced antics keep 
you on the move. Realistic sound effects 
and colorful animated graphics images 
make a game come alive. But some 
gamers tire quickly of the simple-minded 
"thrill and kill" genre, because the ac- 
tion is too repetitive. Games more 
concerned with beating the clock than 
with plotting batdefield strategies usually 
lose their appeal. 

Enter Tesserae (from the Latin word 
meaning cube, or die). This single-player 
strategy game for the Macintosh has all 
the markings of good software entertain- 
ment. It features three levels of difficulty, 
nine mosaic (game-board) layouts, plus 
rich animated graphics images (even on 
black-and-white screens). In a standard 
game, players choose a board mosaic by 
clicking on its icon. In tournament mode, 

Continued on p. SB 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 31 



CREATIVITY 



The 



Electronic 

PALETTE 

With pixels as your medium and the mouse as your tool, 
Mac and GS paint programs help you discover the artist >vithin. 
By CYNTHIA E. FIELD, Ph.D. * CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 



Let your visual imagination run wild — a good 
paint program and a graphics-smart computer 
like the Apple IIgs or the Mac LC can put the 
fun back into creating. How? Besides providing elec- 
tronic versions of traditional art tools such as the sketch- 
pad, the palette, and the brush (and a host of unique 
tools, as well), paint programs offer one extraordinary 
feature, unlike anything you can buy in a graphics- 
supply store: a host of editing, save, and undo options 
that let you alter any part of your image, at any stage, 
neatly, simply, and easily Just as your word processor can 
help you overcome writer's block, a paint program helps 
you conquer your fear of "the empty canvas." 

ARTIST'S CHOICE 

Let's take a look at five popular low-cost art programs: 
Amazing Paint, Color MacCheese, Easy Color Paint, 
MacPaint, and Platinum Paint. (See the accompanying 
sidebar, "For Kids — and Kids at Heart," for a run- 
down on three children's packages for the GS and the 
Mac.) Although each product is unique in certain 
respects (see the accompanying "Portraits in Miniature" 
for details), most Mac and GS paint programs have 
much in common. For one thing, they all exhibit Apple's 
"Human Interface" standard, with easy-to-use pull- 
down menus, dialog boxes, and mouse input (with more- 



or-less standardized alternate keyboard commands for 
the power artists among you). 

Each program offers a well-stocked toolkit, with both 
traditional and New Age paint options packaged in a 
movable palette. (For example, MacPaint, for 512K 
Macintoshes, lets you "tear off" the tool palette mom the 
menu bar much as you would a piece of notepaper from 
a pad. Drag the palette to the screen location you like 
best and, when it's time to admire a completed painting, 
click on the tool window's close box to prevent the 
palette from obstructing your view.) Each tool palette 
sports icons symbolizing the art supplies you need to 
create an unlimited variety Of images — anything from 
landscape paintings to flow charts to school insignias, 
company logos, and hi-tech doodles. 

A choice of a dozen or more brush shapes isn't 
uncommon, and with a full-featured program such as 
Platinum Paint (1 -megabyte GSes) you can even create 
custom brushes from virtually anything you design, 
including digitized or scanned images you've imported. 
"Brushifying" is a lot like rubber-stamping, or placing 
stickers on a piece of paper. 

For precise detailing, your paint program's pencil 
tool and zoom feature are unparalleled. Some prod- 
ucts, Easy Color Paint (1 -megabyte Macs) among them, 
add a magnifying-glass icon to the tool chest, while 



Photography • Larry Dunn 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 33 




An outstanding collection of features, including predefined color palettes, a 70-item 
pattern palette, and a bonus "Hi-Tech Coloring Book," makes Creative Software's 
Easy Color Paint for the Mac an exceptional bargain. Painting above by Randy Marks. 



other programs, including Color Mac- 
Cheese (1 -megabyte Macs), display mag- 
nification buttons such as "2X," which 
doubles the size of selected areas of your 
work. Amazing Vaxnt (512K Macs), offering 
both a magnifying-glass icon and boxed 
symbols, can enlarge your image some 
800 percent. 

SHAPING UP 

In addition to intuitive tools such as 
brushes, pencils, and magnifying glasses, 
paint programs also offer tools that auto- 
matically create hollow or filled, framed 
or borderless geometric primitives. Simply 
click on the round-rectangle icon, for 
instance, and "rubber-band" the shape by 
pressing the mouse button while you drag. 

Creating custom polygons as well as arcs 
and lines (a half-dozen line thicknesses 
are usually offered) is also as easy as 
selecting the appropriate icon from the 
tool palette. Use the shift key whenever 
you want to constrain a shape: The oval 
tool will construct a near-perfect circle, 
the rectangle tool a near-perfect square, 
and so on. 

All paint programs offer at least two 
colors — black and white — and a series of 
patterns, as well. MacPaint and Amazing 
Paint are purely black-and-white programs, 
but are nevertheless ideal for designing 
many kinds of graphics — from a mock-up 
of a commercial advertisement to a deco- 



rative "pen-and-ink" sketch for your 1991 
holiday greeting card. Using the assort- 
ment of gray-scale patterns provided with 
these programs widens your creative 
options further. Incorporate some stylized 
text — all programs support standard Mac 
or GS fonts — to complete your project. 

ELECTRONIC CRAYONS 

True to their names, most paint pro- 
grams offer more colors than a box of 
Crayolas. Multicolored patterns are stan- 
dard with these products, as well, and 
virtually all let you create custom color 
patterns if you like. 

Generally speaking, each paint palette 
displays 16 colors at a time from a cast of 
thousands. Programs like Platinum Paint 
let you create 16-color custom palettes 
from the 4096 hues generated by GS 
systems. Easy Color Paint's 256-color 
Mac palette will spoil you, though. With 
additional memory on the Mac LC, you 
can sample Color MacCheese's 32-bit 
graphics palette and "millions" of colors, 
but you might just be contented with the 
countless options offered by the program's 
color wheel. 

In the GS/Mac art world, paint is never 
in short supply, and applying it is never a 
problem, either. Besides a multitude of 
brushes, try the paint-can and airbrush 
tools to add pizzazz to your creations. The 
paint can fills a designated area with a 



specific pattern, color, or gradient. The 
airbrush (which looks like a can of spray 
paint) spews and splatters paint on your 
canvas according to the nozzle size and 
spray rate you choose. 

Picking colors from the paint palette is 
a snap — just click to "dip" your brush or 
other paint tool on the desired color 
swatch. Paint palettes, like their tool- 
palette counterparts, often take the form 
of windows you can move around the 
screen. Sometimes paint palettes are pull- 
downs or pop-ups instead. 

Replicating a color you used previously 
in a painting is easy if your paint program 
offers an eye-dropper tool; click it on the 
section of canvas displaying the color you 
want to use. It's a lot easier than using a 
paint palette — particularly when the 
palette's composed of hundreds of colors. 

Besides letting you store your creations 
in standard formats on a data disk, color 
programs such as Easy Color Paint let you 
make hardcopies of your paintings on a 
color-capable printer like Apple's 
ImageWriter II. The washed-out quality 
of printed paintings doesn't compare to 
their original screen appearance, though, 
so you might want to consider other 
ways of showing off your work. Two possi- 
bilities come to mind: recording your art 
gallery on videotape directly from the 
computer screen or incorporating your 
creations into hypermedia stacks. 

Sometimes the canvas size you choose 
is larger than the monitor's screen. Moving 
around an outsized painting like that 
is pretty easy, thanks to scroll bars or the 
"grabber" tool (which looks like a pudgy 
human hand). Most programs elicit 
automatic scrolling when the tool you're 
using "bumps" into the paint window's 
boundaries. 

Within memory limits, programs such 
as MacPaint let you work on as many as 
nine paintings at one time. Switching from 
one window to another — for compari- 
son purposes or just for diversion — is as 
easy as pulling down the Goodies menu 
and selecting the artwork you want to view. 

FINISHING TOUCHES 

Editing a traditional painting is at best 
an untidy proposition. Unless you enjoy 
piling on paint and scraping it off, art in 
the "real world" is pretty much a done 



34 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



deal. (Try fixing up a painting that's 
partially or completely dry and you'll see 
what we mean.) With a computer paint 
program, easy-to-use editing tools abound. 
And you can invoke them today, next week, 
or next year. 

Let's say you've painted an avocado on 
the right-hand side of a still life and then 
decided the fruit would look better on the 
left. In the real world, you're out of luck 
unless viewers plan to admire a reflection 
of your masterpiece in a mirror. It's no 
problem with digital artwork, though. 
Begin by selecting the avocado with 
either the marquee or the lasso tool. The 
marquee picks up rectangular areas, while 
the lasso shrink-wraps oddly shaped 
selections. 

Notice how we've avoided the word 
"object" in describing the avocado in our 
hypothetical still life? In "computerese" 
an object is a graphics element that's 
created with a drawing program. Objects 
differ substantially from bit-mapped designs 
created with paint programs like the ones 
we're talking about here. 

Objects are like modular pieces of a 
drawing, which your Apple constructs from 
mathematical formulas. You can click on an 
object, pick it up, and move it around. 
Significandy, you can layer objects without 
erasing any objects that lie underneath. 
Not so with painted creations. They're 
plotted within a grid of picture 
elements (pixels) arranged in a 
single layer on your computer 
screen. Paint a purple pixel green 
and that purple pixel is history. 

While there are probably as 
many ways to rearrange parts of 
your bit-mapped still life as there 
are artistic styles, the easiest may 
be to select the avocado with your 
program's lasso and drag the fruit 
to its new destination. This action, 
however, leaves a white splotch 
on the canvas where the fruit 
appeared originally. If the still 
life's background is simple, you 
can use the paint-can tool to fill 
in color. If the backdrop's some- 
what more elaborate, however, 
you'll want to employ special 
features, such as Platinum Paint's 
shading, blending, and smooth- 
ing options, as well. 



Virtually all paint programs have the 
ability to flip, stretch, and shrink selec- 
tions. In addition, while most programs 
restrict rotation to 90-degree increments, 
Amazing Paint lets you rotate selections 
freely. Marquee the avocado, pull down 
the Effects menu, and choose Free Rotate. 
Tug the corner handles appearing on the 
selection's frame until you get just the 
effect you want. 

With paint programs like the ones 
featured here, even your failed attempts 
won't clutter up your studio. Whenever 
you want, you can start fresh with a new 
canvas: Clear the screen or open a new 
document. You can fix minor bloopers 
with the indispensable Undo command or 
the eraser tool. If you're working in Mac- 
Paint, use the program's Snapshot option 
for bigger blunders, or "revert" to the 
previously saved version of your master- 
piece-in-progress. 

Whether you're searching for a new 
recreational pursuit, a hi-tech medium in 
which to develop your professional 
talents, or new inspiration for your fine- 
arts class, take time to explore the world of 
computer painting. With a boost from a 
low-cost graphics package, your GS or Mac 
can transcend the world of mere produc- 
tivity to become a vehicle for creativity, as 
well. A paint program can give you back 
the freedom to play. 




a a* 1 



Summer Conceit 
August 2a 1991 



GdUvm Memorial Bandstand 
Fwy kinnn*, Rhode Maud 



Concert flier created with CE Software's Amazing 
Paint for the Mac. It's black-and-white only, yet 
offers a substantial number of tools and effects, 
including free rotation and 36 built-in shapes. 



PORTRAITS 
IN MINIATURE 

AMAZING PAINT 1.01 

Despite its exclusively black-and-white 
graphics capability, CE Software's Amazing 
Paint is a surprisingly full -featured Mac 
graphics program. 

Among the software's noteworthy 
attractions is a dynamic three-column 
"equipment palette." The first two 
columns comprise the "tools panel," 
featuring customary implements such as 
the paintbrush, pencil, hand, paint can, 
magnifier, airbrush, and assorted 
geometric shapes. 

In addition to a marquee and a lasso, 
Amazing Paint also provides two special 
selection tools: a shape selector for 
demarcating an area with one of the 
program's 36 built-in shapes (or a shape 
created on the fly) and a unique "wand" 
for capturing interior spaces within 
enclosed areas. 

The third column in the equipment 
palette represents the "action panel," 
which changes to reflect options available 
for a selected tool. When you click on the 
spray can, for instance, the program's 
action panel lets you choose among dozens 
of patterns, shapes, and speeds as well 
as opaque, transparent, inverted, and 
"eraser" inks. 

Here's an extra benefit: Amazing Paint's 
tidy action panel makes the program 
screen one of the least cluttered we've seen. 
For maximum convenience, everything's 
available at the click of a mouse. 

The program's unique multiple-undo 
capability lets you back up — not just one 
step, but two, three, or more; magnifica- 
tion buttons enlarge your work 2X, 4X, 
or 8X, or even reduce it to one-half or 
one-third. 

If your Mac has sufficient memory, you 
can work with as many as eight paintings 
at a time. A singular "billboard mode" 
printing feature lets you create large 
multipage posters, with or without crop 
marks for ease of assembly. 

Among other "amazing" features are 
the program's automatic, customizable 
arrowheads on lines; three dozen eraser 
shapes for ease of editing; user-defined 
corners on round rectangles; and a 
generously illustrated, spiral-bound 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 35 



Apple Central Processing Unit 




Flaw charts are a snap with Baseline's 
Color MacCheese tar the Mac, thanks to a 
coordinates window for precision projects. 

manual that's less than a quarter-inch 
thick and quite a pleasure to read. 



COLOR MACCHEESE 2.0.5 

Without question the most colorful paint 
program evaluated here, Baseline Pub- 
lishing's Color MacCheese for the Mac- 
intosh (reviewed in July 1991, p. 30) may 
well be the most memory intensive, as well 
— if you plan to exploit all its features, 
that is. As the program's sometimes flip- 
pant, sometimes entertaining (but some- 
times sketchy) manual asserts, "A mini- 
mum of 2 megabytes is recommended and 
more is better." 

The reason? Color MacCheese supports 
true 32-bit graphics with millions of 
possible color choices. Fortunately for the 
rest of us, Color MacCheese also helps 
you set preferences for color choice, 



canvas size, and screen display based o 
the amount of random-access memor 
available in your Macintosh. 

The program's flotilla of "floating 
windows" includes a tools area with its 
cache of ordinary items, such as brushes 
and a pencil, and extraordinary ones such 
as an eyedropper, a rake tool, a water-drop 
tool, and a transmogrifier. 

The context-sensitive help window is a 
MacCheese exclusive. Move the mouse 
over a tool or other screen item and the 
window provides pertinent information. 
Point to the transmogrifier, for instance, 
and the help window tells you that this 
tool adds texture, and suggests double- 
clicking on it to set size and flow. 



FOR KIDS — AND KIDS AT HEART 



Before you let your kids share in the fun, reawaken the child inside 
yourself with Color V Canvas, a top-notch GS paint program for 
elementary-school children published by Wings for Learning, an affiliate 
of Sunburst Communications; My Paint, a "no words" GS package 
for kids aged 4 to 8, from Saddleback Graphics; and Kid Pix, a wildly 
entertaining new paint program for the Mac from Broderbund Software. 
Color 'n' Canvas and Kid Pix let you print masterpieces in color on an 
ImageWriter II; you'll get wonderful refrigerator art in color with My 
Paint, too, but you'll have to print it via another GS paint program. 

COLOR YOUR WORLD 

Designed primarily for schools, Color 'n' Canvas [reviewed in January 
1991, p, 86) features seven easy-to-understand pull-down menus, a 
tools bar with items such as brushes, geometric shapes, a paint 
can, a text tool, an eraser, a cut-and-paste tor marquee] tool, a hand 
tool, a magnification tool, and a prominent undo button. Although 
there's no airbrush tool, you can easily create a custom brush to 
simulate a spray can. Some unexpectedly advanced features include 
a choice of grid settings tor no grid] and nine possible brush 



ie Edit Color Eff 




Screen dump: Wings for Learning's Color V Canvas for the 
GS offers plenty of advanced features in an easy interface. 



mirrors. Grids are composed of invisible, magnetic lines that 
help you align your work. Mirrors let you draw brush strokes 
that radiate simultaneously in various directions. 

To make things easier for young artists, Color 'n' Canvas 
uses nonstandard mouse movements. In other programs, 
drawing a line means holding down the mouse button while 
dragging the mouse from the line's origin to its terminus and 
then releasing the button. With Color 'n' Canvas, you click to 
begin the line and click when it's finished. Instead of "rubber- 
banding," you click-drag-click. 

A color bar at the bottom of the screen provides 1 6 hues, 
based on a default palette derived from the traditional RYB 
tred/yellow/blue) color wheel. Teachers can opt to use the RGB 
(red/green/blue) color editor instead. A unique Color 'n' Canvas 
feature lets the teacher design temporary or permanent back- 
grounds on which children build their paintings. Another unique 
feature is the program's ability to format data disks. 

Color 'n' Canvas includes an assortment of options for 
teachers, such as disabling the program's brush-editing 
feature. Like all Sunburst products, Color 'n' Canvas comes with 
a host of lesson ideas and reproducible classroom worksheets. 

ELECTRONIC FINGERPAINTING 

My Paint features animated icons, musical colors, flashing 
paints, and talking pictures. Youngsters can draw and paint 
their own, or brighten up one of 28 black-line graphics 
included on disk. There are 1 colors from which to choose, 
each with its own associated sound. If you point-and-click on 
the colors in just the right order, you can even play a simple 
tune, such as Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star . 

There are no words to read or keyboard commands to 
enter. Kids simply point-and-click on animated icons in a 
menu bar at the top of the screen. The eight paint-tool 
icons include two freehand brushes (one. thick, one thin), 
each painting in a hue selected from the 1 D-color palette run- 
ning down the right side of the screen. A third tool works in 
tandem with either brush to paint freehand strokes in a 
series of six colors (orange, yellow, green, blue, pink, and red). 



36 • inCider/A+ * August 1991 



For precision paint jobs, a special 
window displays x,y coordinates, indicating 
the actual location of the mouse with 
respect to the origin (the upper left-hand 
corner of the document), and delta coor- 
dinates, representing the distance you've 
dragged the mouse. 

Most Mac LC artists will want to display 
the program's 24-color handy palette as 
well as the gorgeous color wheel with 
countless more possibilities. 

Scroll to the end of the patterns palette 
to view the program's rich assortment of 
black-and-white and multicolor designs 
— and its digitized images of famous 

Magazine logo in Easy Color Paint for 
the Mac, dithered for I mage Writer II. 



My Paint's arsenal is limited compared with the array yau' 
find in Color 'n' Canvas, yet it stiil gives children the chance 
to experiment with colors and special effects. Clicking on 
the mirror icon, for example, directs the program to replicate 
a paint stroke both horizontally and vertically. When the 
mirror's "on," the brush paints four images instead of one. The 
program's "fill-'em-up" icon is another useful special-effects 
tool. It encourages kids to draw an outline, then fill it with 
color. The outlined area must be completely enclosed or 
bordered by other areas of color for fill-'em-up tD work; if 
there are any gaps in the border surrounding the outline, fill- 
'em-up will spill paint beyond the outline's boundary. 

Clicking on the menu bar's flashing-colors icon activates 
the program's most interesting special-effects tool. When 
this one's "on," images painted in the drawing window 
change hues rapidly, like color cycling, Elements painted 
with the color brush take on a neon-sign quality as they 
simulate a rippling movement. 

Click on the disk icon and you'll see a new menu with big blue 
and red arrows. Every mouse click on an arrow calls up 
another of the program's 28 line-art drawings. When young- 
sters see a picture they want to color, they just click on it to 
select it, and the color palette reappears. 

Each drawing has an associated audio effect, as well: Click on 
the mouth icon and the brontosaurus growls, the kitty meows, 
the duck quacks, and so on. 

My Paint succeeds because it's not just an ordinary paint 
package. Its innovative approach to electronic painting 
shines through from the moment the program first 
appears on screen. Animated icons, flashing colors, digitized 
speech, and a user-friendly interface combine to make the 
product both easy to use and lots of fun. "It's totally awe- 
some, dude!" exclaimed my 7-year-old helper. I couldn't 
agree with her more. 

NOT FOR KIDS ONLY 

Kid Pix is a blast! Sure, it offers honest-to-goodness paint 
tools such as assorted brushes, familiar geometric shapes, 





and a 36-color paint palette. Some tools — the paint bucket, for 
one — lourv like standard adult fare. But others, such as the stubby pen- 
cil and the moving-van marquee, win thumbs-up for cuteness. Throw 
in a couple of "unique" paint tools, such as the electric 
mixer and rubber stamps, and 
you get the picture: Kid Pix 
is a pure delight! 

So delightful, in fact, that 
the program's paint tools 
make sounds — and some- 
times they even talk. Click on 
the undo guy, and, if he's not 
making boinking sounds, he's 
blurting out an "Oops" or 
an "Oh, no!" Listen to paint 
gurgle or hear the letters of 
the alphabet sounded out 
by real folks speaking English 
or Spanish. Try clicking on 
the text too! and "playing" 
some letters, numbers, and selected punctuation marks just 
as you would musical notes on a piano keyboard. 

Kid Pix's wacky brushes are well named. Try the bubbly-brush option: 
It looks and sounds like bubbles you blow in the bathtub tokay — 
bubbles you used to blow in the bathtub]. The galaxy brush option 
plinks down a random assortment of stars, while the alphabet line 
sounds like a manual typewriter There's even a crazy connect-the-dots 
brush to help you design custom dot-to-dot pictures. 

Kid Pix can import other Macintosh files, including clip art, digitized 
photos, and Print Shop graphics as well as pictures created with 
some of the adult paint programs reviewed in the accompanying arti- 
cle. Kids will relish livening up your artwork with Kid Pix stickers and 
funny brushes. If you have a Mac LC or llsi tor a Macintosh equipped 
with the MacRecorder digitizer card-plus-software sound system 
from Farallon Computing), you can even incorporate real-time sounds 
into your paint files. As we said in our June 1991 issue (Editors' 
Choice, p. 80], Kid Pix is "the best paint program you've ever heard." 

— Cynthia E. Field and Carol S. Holzberg 



Broderbund's Kid Pix for the Mac: the 
best paint program you've ever heard. 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 37 



personalities. If you've been wondering 
where "The King" will appear next, we've 
got the answer — he's been immortalized 
in the Color MacCheese pattern window! 

EASY COLOR PAINT 2.0 

If you're looking for an economically 
priced, one-size-fits-all paint program for 
the Macintosh at home or at school, look 
no further than Creative Software's Easy 
Color Paint. The software comes with four 
ready-made preference files {Intro .Junior, 
Standard, and Artist) and a series of user- 
selectable options to help you configure 
the software to suit your needs. You can 
experiment freely with virtually all 
settings without restarting your Mac. 

For example, the Artist level paint palette 
displays dozens of colors at one time, but 
the paint chips are so tiny that it might 
be difficult for very small children or 
visually impaired adults to select colors or 
to discern subtle differences among them. 
Paint swatches in the 256-color Standard 
palette are larger, and those in the 16- 
color palettes are the largest of all. 

Children will enjoy the program's 
accompanying Hi-Tech Coloring Book, which 
contains dozens of ready-to-fill pictures 
on disk. We can't think of a better way for 
elementary-school kids to earn computer 
"bragging rights" than to embellish one 
of these drawings and print it on an 
ImageWriter II. 

When you're ready to create original 
artwork, Easy Color Paint provides the 
tools you need. When you click on certain 




Easy Color Paint offers selectable options 
configuration. Electronic "sampler" above 

items in the program's Tools pull-down 
menu or the skinny-tools palette, the 
program's menu bar changes accordingly. 
For example, clicking on the eraser 
creates a special menu you pull down to 
alter that tool's size. 

More than a dozen predefined color 
palettes and various gradient fill modes 
are available in Easy Color Paint. There's 
also a "triangle-plus" tool for drawing 
special geometric shapes such as crosses, 
diamonds, and wedges. 

In addition, the program's pull-down 
pattern palette provides more than 70 
ready-made black-and-white and multi- 
color patterns. Like some of its pricier 
competitors, Easy Color Paint even lets 
you choose degree of roundness on the 
corners of round rectangles. 



m^-jo's 



443-9700 5? 



ITALIAN-AMERICAN 
CUISINE 



I 



401 Main St 
Newport 



Featuring This Week... 

t Pork Braci ol et t i ne 
™ Alia Korrin 
$ 13.95 



^ Closed Monday i> \* 



Claris' black-and-white MacPaint offers a solid array of tool options and type 
styles, plus the ability to save frequently used text and art as template files. 



Easy Color Paint lacks 
a few of the usual popu- 
lar features — free rota- 
tion, for one — and the 
program's spelling of 
marquee (m-a-r-k-e-e) is 
a little disconcerting. 
Despite these minor 
gripes, though, Easy 
Color Paint offers a 
stable of features we 
consider outstanding 
for a program costing 
so litde. 



£ , MACPAINT 2.0 

for individual 

by Kjersti Ehrie. Although it displays in 
black-and-white only, 
Claris Corporation's MacPaint program 
is a respected standard bearer among soft- 
ware products for Apple computers. The 
program supports up to nine movable, 
resizable document windows. 

Myriad tool options include, among 
other things, multiple brush sizes and 
shapes, a ready-made (but editable) 
pattern palette, assorted type styles, and 
special alignment controls, including both 
text justification and line leading. 

Unlike most commercial paint programs 
in its class, MacPaint sports a mouse- 
position window displaying not only x,y 
and delta coordinates, but also distance 
in inches, centimeters, or pixels. 

In addition to the usual undo and 
revert-to-saved features, MacPaint offers 
a unique Take Snapshot command that 
lets you save a backup copy of your paint- 
ing in the computer's memory. If 
you make a series of changes you'd later 
like to discard, recall the snapshot by 
choosing Revert to Snapshot from the 
Edit pull-down menu. 

Another MacPaint-specific feature is the 
program's ability to save files as "stationery 
templates." The MacPaint user's guide 
compares stationery files to pads of 
preprinted forms. Each template contains 
text and artwork you use frequendy and 
opens as an untitled document — a 
safety valve that precludes the likelihood 
of erasing the original template on 
your data disk. 

MacPaint may lack advanced features 
such as custom brush shapes, editable 
spray-can nozzles, and free rotation, but 



38 * inCider/A+ • August 1991 



the program offers most of the capabilities 
you're likely to need. 

Combine a crisp interface, pull-down 
(or pop-up) tool and pattern palettes, a 
host of tried-and-true paint features, and 
well-designed documentation (80 clearly 
written pages), and you've got a combi- 
nation that's hard to beat. 

PLATINUM PAINT 1.01 

If the Apple of your eye is a IlGS, run, 
don't walk, to your favorite software 
vendor and get your hands on a copy of 
Platinum Paint, a Beagle Bros product we 
admire absolutely unabashedly (Editors' 
Choice, January 1991, p. 112, reviewed 
in April 1991, p. 32). Truth be told, if we 
were forced to prepare a head- to-head 
feature comparison between this GS 
program and the Macintosh products 
we've described in this article, Platinum 
Paint could beat the competition to a juicy 
red pulp. 

Like its Mac counterparts, Platinum 
Paint supports multiple document 
windows and offers a selection of standard 
painting tools, such as the marquee, the 
lasso, the airbrush, and the polygon. You 
can even use analogous Mac keyboard 
commands to open and save files or to 
constrain shapes or tool actions. The 
program's paint bucket performs gorgeous 
gradient fills, and its dropper lets you 
switch paint color as fast as you can say 
"Macintosh." 

But Platinum Paint offers a whole lot 
more. For one thing, the program sports 
the longest list of editing features we've 
seen. Not only can you flip a selection 
both horizontally and vertically, you can 
mirror it, halve it, double it, stretch it, 
slant it, freely rotate it, add perspective to 
it, and cast a shadow beneath it. Don't 
worry about getting carried away with all 
these changes: You can mask colors or 
selected areas so that you don't alter them. 

As you might expect, learning Platinum 
Paint's countless nuances presumes spend- 
ing some time with the program's docu- 
mentation, a 124-page manual that's 
nicely illustrated and written with both 
clarity and style. The abundance of sample 
files that accompany the program can help 
you become familiar with some of 
Platinum faint's outstanding capabilities. 
We particularly enjoyed the program's 



4 File Hit Hisc Window Node Nosk Font Stifle Size 





— — 

□ 














/ 




a 


\ v.- ' i 


3 






m 



Cat.P Iotinum 



if 




Screen dump from Beagle Bros' Platinum Paint for the GS. The program is 
compatible with a sizable range of Apple II graphics formats, and offers a unique 
selection of image-editing capabilities and brush effects. 



short tutorial lessons on squishing custom 
brushes, colorizing gray-scale images, and 
animating artwork through color cycling. 

Best of all, this one gives you room to 
grow: The ability to import a wide variety 
of Apple II graphics (including Print Shop 
and Print Shop GS formats) and a choice 
of normal, matte, smear, slide, charcoal, 



shade, wash, and smooth brush methods 
mean you won't have to worry about out- 
growing Platinum Paint anytime soon. □ 



Cynthia Field is the author of Press Room, 
our column on desktop publishing, write to 
her at 60 Border Drive, Wakefield, RI 02879. 
Enclose an SASE if you'd like a personal reply. 





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Easy Color Paint 2.0 


95052-8168 


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Creative Software 


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1MB Apple ItGS 


3213 Annandale Road 


$125 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 39 



Command 

PERFORMANCE 

For teaching, recital, and composition, in classrooms, concert halls, 
and studios, Apple lis and Macs deliver a powerful sound. 

By GREGG KEIZER * CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 



If the closest you come to making music is whining 
along with Neil Young on your car radio or danc- 
ing in your briefs to an MTV riff, you're not alone. 
Millions of us can't carry a tune to save our lives. 

Fortunately, millions can — millions of machines, that 
is. Apple computers — from the sedate lie to the bois- 
terous IIgs to the professional Macintosh — can sing 
like a Baptist choir, swing from country to rock as quick 
as the Kentucky Headhunters, and soar in symphonic 
power like the Boston Pops. If you want to make music 
but can't read a note, an Apple II or a Mac will let you 
jam along. If you teach music, the computer is an 
infinitely patient one-on-one instructor. And if you're a 
professional musician — a performer or composer — a 
computer/synthesizer combination puts a whole 
orchestra and sound studio on your desktop. 

Still think computers and the fine arts don't mix? Think 
again — and listen to what music lovers are doing with 
lies, GSes, and Macs as their instruments. The pros — 
musicians and teachers — have blazed this new techno- 
logical path, but even those of us who thought we could 
only warble along get to reap the notes they've sown. 

SILICON VALLEY SINGS 

Long before the term MIDI (musical-instrument digital 
interface — see our accompanying story, "The MIDI 



Beat," on p. 44 in this issue for details) meant anything 
to the rest of us, San Jose Academy was connecting 
Apple He computers with Casio keyboards in an inno- 
vative teaching laboratory. 

A magnet school that attracts 16 different minority 
groups to its fine-arts and technology-based curricu- 
lum, San Jose Academy sports one of the most impres- 
sive electronic-music programs in the country. Dr. Hal 
Peterson, head of the fine-arts department, runs the 
MIDI lab as well. 

"I'm teaching music through technology," says 
Peterson, as he looks out over the lab's 24 Apple lies, 
banked in two rows and spread out on both sides of 
his command center. "We do most of our instruc- 
tion through computers rather than through tradi- 
tional means." 

That's easy to see when you take a walk through 
Peterson's lab. Each student workstation features 
an Apple lie, a Casio CZ-1 synthesizer, a Passport 
MIDI interface, and a color monitor. Connected via 
a Corvus Omninet network to a 126-megabyte file 
server, the workstations are also linked to five 
ImageWriter II printers. 

At the front of the room, Peterson's teaching center 
includes a similarly equipped He, as well as a space- 
ship-style panel that controls the lab. A compact-disc 



Photography • Larry Dunn 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 41 



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player, a laser-disc player, and a video- 
cassette recorder let him pump music over 
speakers or display video on every monitor. 

Because much of Peterson's program 
originates as software-based instruction, 
the network is vital, letting students 
progress at their own speed as they learn 
basic keyboard technique, musical nota- 
tion, electronic sound creation and editing, 
sound sampling, and more. Peterson 
lobbied software publishers to make their 
packages work on the network; the result 
is a collection of site licenses for more than 
40 programs. 

A lab session may see Peterson at his 
command center, playing a sequence on 
his Roland synthesizer over his students' 
earphones. He may put on a laser disc 
highlighting several composers of classical 
music. Kids may walk themselves through 
a self-paced lesson on digital sampling, 
or work on their own musical projects. 

The technology doesn't work without 
some sweat, though. Setting up the 
network was a minor nightmare; keeping 
it up and running is almost a full-time job. 
And though the Apple He was the right 
choice when the lab was built, Peterson 
looks forward to the day when he can 
integrate more powerful machines into 
the lab. "I need high-end workstations for 
the advanced students," he explains. "The 
Macintosh is the machine of the music 
industry. And there are certain things that 
the PC can do," particularly with the more 
sophisticated music-editing and notation 
software commercially available in the 
MS-DOS marketplace. 

But Peterson says he won't give up his 
Apple lie stations. "The kids don't want to 
just read things — they want you to show 
them," he observes. Peterson does just 
that, playing student projects over huge 
speakers or putting scrolling scores on the 
students' monitors. "It's a powerful way 
to present ideas, and music," he notes. 

"The computer is like a textbook," says 
Garrick Wahlstrand, one of Peterson's 
charges, "but you don't have to carry a 
textbook around." Adds Kiki Walker, 
another student, "The computer lets you 
work at your own speed. You can arrange 
a piece of music one instrument at a time, 
in small pieces." 

The technology isn't cheap — the com- 
puter parts of the lab carry a price tag of 



well over $100,000 — but Peterson sees a 
more pressing limitation: "The reason you 
don't see more classes like this is a 
matter of training. The kids aren't threat- 
ened by this, but many music teachers are." 

MUSIC ON THE MOUNTAIN 

High atop a ridge overlooking Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, on the former site of 
an anti-aircraft missile battery, kids play 
Apple IlGS computers like so many muscial 
instruments. 

The Talcott Mountain Science Center 
gives children a glimpse of the future. With 
22 telescopes, a Doppler weather radar 
system, a national satellite network, and a 
range of other high-tech hardware items, 
the school spreads hands-on learning 
among children in the Hartford area, 
throughout New England, and across the 
country. Donald La Salle, Talcott's director, 



calls it an attempt to "give kids tech- 
nology and literally turn them loose." 

Children come from neighboring towns 
for day-long and weekend instruction, while 
60 exceptionally gifted students attend the 
center's on-site day school. All get a crack at 
Talcott's many computers, including its 
Apple Ilcses, which specialize in making 
music. Sixteen of them stock one of the 
center's two labs. With the exception of 
inexpensive headphones, the computers 
are off-the-rack, 1 -megabyte machines. 

"Music for the younger kids is strictly 
based on the Apple lies," says Greg La 
Salle, the center's music teacher. "All their 
training stems from learning to write 
music." And that's possible because of the 
machine's accessible, built-in graphics and 
sound capabilities. 

"You don't have to add anything to the 
GS," La Salle explains. "For teaching, it's 



42 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



more than adequate. Music used to mean 
learning theory first, and not being able to 
do anything with it. Now it's just the 
opposite. Kids get turned off because they 
can't play an instrument well, or at least for 
years. Now, with the GS, they can write 
their own music. And strangely enough, 
because they're writing it, it doesn't matter 
what it sounds like." 

La Salle uses Music Shapes, from Music 
Systems for Learning, with the younger 
children — it's ideal for ear training, basic 
composition, and building instruments 
with the GS' 15-voice Ensoniq sound chip. 
From there, Activision's Music Studio takes 
over, and students begin to put notes 
on screen. Other GS software packages La 
Salle engages include Instrument 
Designer from Pygraphics' Pyware line — 
a great program for learning sound sam- 
pling — and Music Writer (also from 
Pygraphics), the best music-printing soft- 
ware available for the machine, according 
to La Salle. He boots up Electronic Arts' 
Instant Music to entice uninterested 
students into simply "mousing around." 

"Eventually, they hook up MIDI key- 
boards," says La Salle. "Usually they'll 
MIDI up what they've done in Music 
Studio because they don't have to redo 
any of their work. In fact, all their work 
is saved from the fourth grade until the 
time they graduate." In effect, the Talcott 
Mountain plan means that students' 
music can grow as they grow as musicians. 

The GS brings a slew of benefits to any 
music program, claims La Salle. Compo- 
sition and performance are easy with the 
GS, he explains, so "kids retain a lot more, 
because they're using what they're learning. 
It quickly gets them to a level where they 
can use the things they've learned, and it 
gives them a chance to explore a variety 
of musical styles." Without a computer like 
the GS, adds La Salle, "you couldn't do 
orchestral arrangements with elementary- 
school kids; you couldn't print music." 

"And they get to bring recordings of 
their work home," La Salle notes. "Kids 
bring home art to put up on the refriger- 
ator, but what do they bring home from 
music class? How many parents sit and 
listen to their kids play the violin? With 
the computer, kids can create music, tape 
it, and bring home cassettes. 

"It's a zillion times easier since we added 



the GS," concludes La Salle. "Kids learn 
— and learn more thoroughly — with 
the IlGS computers." 

A JAZZ BEAT IN THE BIG EASY 

New Orleans — home to Bourbon Street, 
Mardi Gras, and jazz — plays like no 
other city. So it comes as no surprise that 
the Orleans Parish School District 
features a school for the performing arts. 

The New Orleans Center for Creative 
Arts (NOCCA) is a half-day high school 
specializing in music, theater, dance, writ- 
ing, and the visual arts. Students attend 
their home high school for the academics, 
then hit NOCCA for intense instruction in 
their areas of interest. In music, NOCCA 
students focus on jazz instrumental, classical 
instrumental, or classical vocal study. 

Stephen Dankner, the next chairman of 
NOCCA's music department, is a big 
believer in computers. A professional 
musician with some impressive credentials 
of his own, Danker has overseen the 
school's "Computing in the Arts" program 
and was instrumental in bringing tech- 
nology to NOCCA's music program. 

The three dozen music students at 
NOCCA share a workstation that includes 
a Mac SE, three sophisticated synthesizers 
with a total capacity of 60-some voices, an 
effects processor, and sequencing and nota- 
tion software. Though Dankner stresses 
traditional methods of composition — even 
as far as requiring students to score a piece 
in longhand first — he holds the Mac in 
high regard. "I couldn't conceive of any- 
thing else," he admits, adding that "students 
take to the Mac like a duck to water. It's an 
amazing machine. They don't need any out- 
side help at all, and in fact can do high- 
caliber work in a very short time. " 

As a tool for composition and notation, 
the Mac SE, running Mark of the Unicorn's 
Performer and Composer Notation 
programs, is, in Dankner's words, "a new 
way to hold a pen. It's a visually based 
system of composition and performance 
that allows instant access to ideas, and lets 
you modify them for much quicker response 
time. The old days of trying things out and 
paying performers to let you hear what 
your work sounds like were much slower. 
[The computer] lets you try things out to 
make sure they're going to work." 

The Mac puts a musical word processor 



in the hands of his students, Dankner 
explains: "If you don't like something, you 
can cut and paste until it's perfect. It's revo- 
lutionary. If Bach had had this, he wouldn't 
have had to guess what he'd written. It makes 
my work more concise. I can always try it 
out to make sure it's exactly what I want." 

In his home studio, Danker runs a Mac- 
intosh II, three hard-disk drives, three 
Kurzweil synthesizers, a mixer, and a full 
MIDI keyboard to compose and refine his 
own music. The setup provides an instant 
orchestra, letting him re-create music such 
as his recent piano and cello concertos 
without leaving home. "I can do a full 
orchestration on tape," he says. "I can give 
that tape to anybody, and they don't have 
to imagine what my music sounds like. 
They can hear it for themselves." 

At the New Orleans Aquarium of the 
Americas, a new attraction alongside the 
Mississippi River, a Mac Plus connected to 
eight synthesizers plays four hours of 
Dankner's music as background in the 
Caribbean, Mississippi, and Gulf of Mexico 
exhibits. The seven-month project resulted 
in a score more than 500 pages long and 
music files of more than a megabyte. But 
Dankner says he doesn't feel that his home 
studio helped him write music faster, or be 
a more productive composer — it simply 
made him more creative. "The more you 
work with computers [in music] the more 
you realize they can't replace human 
beings," he says. "The soul and artistry of a 
good player just can't be replicated," 

Even in music instruction, computers are 
no panacea to Dankner — but in their place 
as one in an array of tools for teaching, 
composition, and performance, they fill a 
niche that can support a curriculum in new 
ways. Balance is the key to getting the most 
from the machine. "I see the whole appli- 
cation as a veneer over the traditional way 
to teach music," Dankner states. "I believe 
strongly in that. You have to be able to hear 
and read music in the traditional ways. 
Integrating this layer just makes you a 
more powerful composer." □ 

Contributing Editor Gregg Keizer is the 
author of Bridging the Gap, inCwer/A + 's 

MONTHLY COLUMN ON APPLE II/MAC CONNECTIV- 
ITY. Write to him at 614 Linden Street, 
Shreveport, LA 71104. Enclose a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope if you'd like 
a personal reply. 



August 1991 « inCider/A+ • 43 



CREATIVITY 



The 

MIDI 



BEAT 



What have M.C. Hammer, David Gilmour, and 
Steve Vai got that you haven't got? Talent? 
Well, sure, but you can't do anything about 
that. Money? Yeah, but they had to start at the bottom, 
just like you. What about their musical equipment? 
Chances are they're using synthesizers — electronic 
instruments that work together through MIDI, an 
acronym that stands for musical-instrument digital interface, 
the lingua franca of sound-generating chips. 

MIDI was born in the early 1980s as a way for musi- 
cians to exchange information between synthesizers 
that weren't manufactured by the same company. At 
first it was of interest only to professional musicians, 
but as developers began to see that you could cable a 
personal computer to a synthesizer and control the 
instrument through the computer's software, MIDI 
rapidly turned into a marketplace buzzword. 

Today, the MIDI standard is to the electronic-music 
business what SCSI (small-computer-systems interface) is 
to the home-computer industry. Whether you're a 
performing musician, a composer, or someone who just 
likes to tweak notes in your basement, you can plug 
into your Apple II or Macintosh with MIDI. 

TUNE IN 

Even if MIDI didn't exist, you could still walk over 
to your electronic keyboard and play one of Bach's 
cantatas or Chopsticks, whichever' s your speed, because 



How does one person 
play A Bicycle Built 
for Two in three-quarter 
time on four instruments? 
Through the magic of MIDI, 
of course. All together now . . . 
By CAMERON GROTTY * 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

all synthesizers have their own internal sound generators. 
With MIDI, you don't teach your synthesizer new sounds 
—you tell it when and how to play them. MIDI's purpose 
is to allow the transmission of performance data, such as 
when a note starts, its pitch, and when it ends. 

Why use MIDI? Professional performers often hook 
up two or more synthesizers playing in sync to create a 
fatter sound with subtler harmonics. But when was the 
last time you played the Meadowlands to a sold-out 
crowd? MIDI gives amateur musicians new options, 
too. MIDI data is digital, which is where personal com- 
puters come in — you can connect your MIDI instru- 
ment via cable to an interface device and from there 
to your Apple, and, with the right software, record your 
performance on disk as you play your synthesizer. 

You might tell your program to convert your music to 
a full conductor's score (or wave forms or other geo- 
metric symbols, in some cases) on screen; the software's 



'hotography • Larry Dunn 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 45 



GLOSSARY 

Aftertouch. Pressure applied to a key after a note has been struck. 
Click crack. Audible clicks produced by your sequencer to keep you on the 
beat as you play. 

Foot switch. Foot-operated switch, often used to control sustain. 

MIDI. Musical-instrument digital interface. Established standard for transmitting 

data between electronic musical instruments, computers, and other devices. 

Patch. Specific instrument sound from a synthesizer, used to piay notes. 

Also called voice, and, more broadly, timbre, A maximum number of voices 

is programmed into synthesizer. 

Polyphonic synthesizer. Capable of playing more than one note at a time. 

Polytimbral synthesizer. Capable of playing more than one patch at a time. 

Punch in. MIDI or tape-recorder feature allowing user to switch from playback 

to record at a preset location in a musical sequence. 

Quantization. Computer-controlled correction for sloppy rhythmic play. 

Rack mount. Components designed to fit into an audio rack. 

Sampler. Plug-in sound-digitization card for computers, or stand-alone unit that 

records short sequences of (analog) voices, sounds, and music; converts them to 

digital data and stores them on disk for inclusion in synthesized music composition 

as desired. Accompanying software allows editing of sound data for speed, volume, 

fade, reverse, stutter, and so on. 

Sequencer. Computer program that records on disk digital data representing 
music characteristics [not the music itself, as a tape recorder would) from 
synthesizer; allows music editing, such as deletion, transposition, adjustments to 
tempo and volume, and so on, and playback through synthesizer. Maximum number 
of tracks user can record and mix varies from program to program, Interface 
[controlled by mouse, arrow keys, keyboard overlay, or some combination) shows 
on-screen notes and staves, wave forms, colored boxes and lines, or other 
representation of music. 

Synthesizer. Music-generating computer chip (such as GS' Ensoniq], plug-in card, 
or stand-alone electronic instrument (keyboard, wind, percussion, guitar most 
popular). MID! instrument outputs music two ways; through its own speaker as 
analog sound heard by listener, and as digital data representing each note's 
characteristics (timbre, pitch, volume, and so on) according to MIDI standard. 
Step input/editing. Notes recorded separately, edited one at a time, and strung 
together to produce musical sequence; as opposed to real-time input. 
Timbre. Sound characteristics of a particular type of instrument 
(piano, flute, violin, and so on). 

Track. Musical sequence recorded one (or a few) instruments (voices) at a time 
(not simultaneously); individual tracks combined to produce multi-instrument sound. 
Allows punching in for re-recording of one segment of music by one voice; allows 
editor to hear individual voices for clean editing and adjustment; allows one player 
to perform on all instruments by recording one instrument at a time, then mixing. 
Transcription software. Program that lets user write musical notation on 
screen from computer keyboard; may also record notation on screen auto- 
matically as user plays synthesizer. 



editing function will then let you cut and 
paste as you choose — something like 
word processing for music. (Many pro- 
grams let you make a hardcopy, too, if 
your printer's hooked up.) 

You can then tell your computer to send 
the new version back to your synthesizer, 
or to several MIDI devices at once if you 
like, and play it for you from the score 
you've just written. And because MIDI 
is an agreed-upon standard among 
computer manufacturers, you can also 



transport your recording on disk between 
machines that use different operating 
systems, if the program you're using 
with the second computer contains a trans- 
lator module. 

We'll get into your software options 
later. First, let's turn on the bright lights 
and poke around in MIDI'S innards. 

KNOCKING ON HEAVEN'S DOOR 

The central component of any MIDI 
system is, of course, the synthesizer. If you 



haven't purchased one yet, now is the time 
to consider the role you want it to play. 
Are you an accomplished pianist? Then 
you might want to consider a full keyboard 
with weighted keys and lots of pressure/ 
velocity sensors to take advantage of your 
skill. Foot swatches and pedals let you 
manipulate volume and sustain on the fly. 

For the pianist with the soul of a clar- 
inet player, some synthesizers offer input 
through a breath controller, which lets you 
play notes on your keyboard while you blow 
into a small device that translates airflow 
into attack, sustain, and volume. 

If you play a wind instrument for real, 
you might want to consider an input, device 
that looks and plays much like, say, a 
saxophone. Guitar controllers are also 
common among MIDI musicians. 

The abilities and limitations of your 
synthesizer's microprocessor — the selec- 
tion of timbres (different instrument, sounds, 
or voices) programmed into it and the 
complexity of the music they produce — 
should be another important factor in your 
decision. Most synthesizers currently on 
the market are polyphonic — they can 
sound more than one note at a time. Some 
are limited to four notes at once, while 
others can play eight or 16. 

But although most synthesizers can 
mimic a number of different instruments, 
only a few can play more than one of their 
instrument sounds at the same time, such 
as flute and trombone together. Those 
that can are called polytimbral and are 
usually more expensive, but they'll save you 
the cost and trouble of setting up several 
synthesizers wiien you want to play multi- 
instrument scores. 

THE EXTRAS 

Once you've got your main synthesizer, 
you can start thinking about other compo- 
nents. How about a drum, machine — a box 
that produces synthesized percussion? It's 
expensive, but for a performance-oriented 
musician, it's worth it. 

Drum machines are button operated — 
they don't play easily like an instrument — 
but if your unit comes with special software, 
you can cut and paste rhythms together for 
a final sequence the device can play as you 
perform on your synthesizer. 

Dr. T's Music Software markets an alter- 
native drum-machine software controller 



46 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



SESSION IN PROGRESS 

Apple computers have earned a home in the studios of professional musicians — 
Joey Latimer and his Mac-based music system prove it. Latimer, a former record- 
ing engineer with a Southern California studio, now operates his own recording 
studio out of his house in Idyllwild — and a Macintosh SE heips him run his opera- 
tion. In the studio's control room, the SE connects with Latimer's MIDI equip- 
ment, which includes a Kawai K-1 multitimbral synthesizer, a Roland MT-32 sound 
module, a Casio CZ-101 keyboard, and a Roland drum machine. Two mixing boards 
and a rackful of effects gear complete the hardware. 

"You can simulate a whole band at your fingertips," says Latimer of his SE/MIDI 
setup. "If we write a new song and want to try it out to see what it sounds like 
with the band, we can do it. In fact, we can assemble all kinds of orchestration 
without much work at all. " 

Using Vision, a sequencer for the Macintosh from Opcode, Latimer can catl up 
sampled sounds and electronic instruments to add texture to the tunes he cuts 
for others, and for himself. "I recorded my entire last album, The Coyote and the 
Princess , with the computer, so I could remaster it digitally," Latimer explains. 
"Everything we do is played into either the computer or the tape machine. That 
lets us try things out quickly, and makes all the sounds transportable." In other 
words, the Mac makes it possible to assemble and reassemble music in an infinite 
variety of ways for just the right sound. That ability will come in handy when 
Latimer takes his record company, Idyllwild Music, into the world of compact 
discs. Idyllwild plans to put out its first CD, a sampler of Latimer's five initial 
albums of contemporary folk music, this fall. 

Latimer likes the Macintosh for several surprising reasons. For one thing, he 
says, "it has a small footprint tthe space it occupies on the desktop]. And the 
Mac is very quiet and subdued compared to a PC," which often features fans that 
sound like rockets in the quiet of a studio. 

Cutting records on a shoestring means cutting costs, too. The Mac helps by 
making it possible for an individual musician like Joey Latimer to create music 
without the expense of studio musicians or a live band. "I'm on my fourth Mac," 
he says. "I just like its style. " — Gregg Keizer 



called UpBeat for 512K Macintoshes. 

With MIDI, you can start small and add 
to your system piece by piece. Rack-mount 
synthesizers, for instance, so named because 
they mount in a rack like stereo compo- 
nents, give you the brain and sounds of a 
synthesizer without making you pay for 
another keyboard. 

Components called samplers accept 
sound from an acoustic instrument or the 
human voice and translate it into MIDI 
data; with software such as Passport's 
Alchemy and Digidesign's Sound 
Designer for the Mac (part of Digidesign's 
high-end Sound Tools hardware/software 
package), you can edit the data and 
incorporate it into your synthesized 
compositions. 

Alternatively, you can plug a digitizer 
card into your computer for the same 
purpose. For the GS, there's Applied 
Engineering's Sonic Blaster; for the Mac 
there's Farallon's MacRecorder. Accom- 
panying software lets you edit the sound — 
cut and paste, and adjust volume, speed, 
fade, and so on. 

The Mac LC includes built-in sound 
digitization and comes with a microphone; 
you can access this feature with a program 
called Voice Navigator from Articulate 
Systems. 

MIDI TALK 

So what kind of data does your MIDI 
system generate? MIDI data describes a 
series of events that occur over time. The 
most important direcuy control the sounds 
coming out of your speaker by way of the 
synthesizer's voice. They're called channel 
voice messages and there are seven of them: 
note on, no^t off, polyphonic key pres- 
sure, channel pressure, program change, 
control change, and pitch-bend change. 

Note on and note off are exactly what they 
sound like — they signal the beginning or 
end of a note. A note-on message usually 
contains the pitch of a note; some synthe- 
sizers can also sense its attack velocity — the 
speed at which you depress a key, usually 
interpreted as loudness, or volume. 

Polyphonic key pressure and channel pressure 
measure how hard you press a key after a 
note has been played; your synthesizer will 
adjust vibrato or volume depending on the 
pressure. These messages are usually 
grouped together as aftertouch, or the way 



the note changes after you play it. A mech- 
anism such as a volume pedal or a sustain 
foot switch send control-change messages. 
Most synthesizers have a built-in pitch-bend 
wheel for manual adjustment; it signals the 
synthesizer to bend the pitches it's playing 
either up or down. 

Program change signals a synthesizer to 
switch voices — from flute sounds to 
piano, for instance. (Synthesizer voices are 
also called patches, because musicians once 
had to physically move wires called patch 
cables to get different sounds.) 

Other types of MIDI data include system 
real-time and system common messages, 
received by all devices on the MIDI net- 
work to help coordinate timing and tuning. 

All this data is transmitted through 
cables that carry 16 discrete channels apiece 
to and from your computer and your music 
system's components. 

A MIDI device can "broadcast" and 
"receive" incoming data on any or all chan- 
nels, according to the assignments you make 
at each MIDI device. In a large, complex 
system, all 16 channels can be busy at once, 



carrying different messages to up to 16 
different instruments. 

THE INTERFACE ROUTE 

Cables are hooked into one of three kinds 
of ports: MIDI IN, MIDI OUT, and MIDI 
THRU. IN and OUT function as their 
names imply, bringing input and output to 
and from the synthesizer's microprocessor. 
The THRU port avoids the processor and 
sends out an exact copy of what was received 
at the IN port, allowing all devices in a net- 
work to have equal access to all 16 channels. 

How does MIDI data get from your 
synthesizer and its accessories into your 
computer? You'll find several avenues 
open to you on this part of the MIDI 
journey. One of the simplest is Apple's own 
external MIDI Interface box (for either 
the GS and the Mac), which turns MIDI 
IN and OUT into Apple-standard serial 
input via cable through your computer's 
printer or modem jack. 

Applied Engineering makes an external 
MIDI interface called Audio Animator for 
the GS; Roland makes a combination 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 47 



interface for the He — the MPU-401 
external box with internal MIF-APL card. 
Passport Designs makes an external MIDI 
Interface for the Mac and the GS. 

THE FLIP SIDE 

Anyone who has ever tried to edit MIDI 
data on a dedicated sequencer — some- 
thing like word processing with a ten-key 
layout and a 1 2 -character LCD — will 
appreciate the greater processing power 
and flexibility a computer can provide. Of 
course, simply hooking a computer up to 
your synthesizer doesn't automatically give 
you any more control over your music — 
that's where software comes in. 

In the early days of recorded music, 
producers learned that if they recorded 
each musician on a separate track through 
individual microphones, they could get a 
cleaner sound and control the volume of 
each instrument when they mixed the 



tracks back together. Also, if an artist blew 
a lick, they could just go back and rere- 
cord that instrument, instead of making 
the whole band play the song over again. 

Today, the technology has improved to 
the point that a musician can punch in — 
rerecord a specific section of a specific 
track. The process is called track sequencing, 
and in a modern studio it's possible for 
one person to play every instrument on 
an entire record, from drums to vocals to 
lead guitar. In fact, several pop stars have 
taken this approach. 

Performers use sequencing to get their 
albums just right. Composers can use 
sequencing to hear what their full works 
will sound like, even though they can play 
only one instrument's score at a time. 
Similarly, using MIDI-compatible 
sequencing software in your home studio 
can let you create complex musical pieces 
even if you're not an instrumental virtuoso. 



Sequencing programs offer a number 
of features, such as easily adjustable 
tempo controls, the ability to transpose 
pieces to different keys, and the option to 
cut, copy, and paste measures just as you 
would text with a word processor. 

Most programs can also handle both 
step and real-time input with adjustable 
quantization values. For real-time input, you 
have the computer give you an audible 
tempo called a click track (sort of an elec- 
tronic metronome) and play the music 
as you would normally. With step input, 
you can enter notes one at a time, then 
adjust their duration (and pitch, if neces- 
sary) manually and put them together via 
the software. 

Quantization can make up for human 
timing errors by shortening or lengthen- 
ing notes slightly to correct for rhyth- 
mically sloppy play. Quantization can be a 
great relief if your sense of timing isn't up 



PRODUCT INFORMATION 



Alchemy, 

$695 

Mac 

Encore, 

$595 
Mac 

MIDI Hits, 

$29.95 
Mac 

MIDI Interface, 

$129.95 

GS or Mac 

Pro4, 

$495 

Mac 

Trax, 

$99 

Mac 

Passport Designs 
625 Miramontes St. 
Half Moon Bay, 
CA 94019 
£415) 726-0280 
[800) 443-3210 

Audio Animator, 

$219 
GS 

Sonic Blaster, 

$129 
GS 

Applied Engineering 
RO. Box 5100 
Carrollton, 
TX 75011 
(214} 241-6060 

Casio, Inc. 

1 5 Gardener Road 

Fairfield. 

NJ 07006 



ConcertWare +MIDI 

Great Wave 
Software 
5353 Scotts 
Valley Drive 
Scotts Valley, 
CA 95066 
(408) 438-1990 
$189.95 
Mac 

Deluxe Music 
Construction Set 

Electronic Arts 

1 820 Gateway Drive 

San Mateo, 

CA 94404 

[4153 571-7171 

$129.95 

Mac 

Diversi-Tune 

Diversified 
Software Research 
931 2 Harvey Road 
Silver Spring, 
MD 20910 
(301)942-2261 
$75 
GS 

Finale 

Coda Music 
Software 

1401 East 79th St. 

Minneapolis, MN 

55425-1126 

(612) 854-1288 

$749 

Mac 



Jam Factory, 

$179 

Mac 

M, 

$179 

Mac 

Upbeat. 

$199 
Mac 
Dn T's 

Music Software 
1 00 Crescent Road 
Needham, 
MA 02194 
£617) 455-1454 

Kawai America 
Corporation 

2055 East 
University Drive 
Compton, 
CA 90224 
(213] 534-2350 

Kurzweil 
Music Systems 

41 1 Waverley 
Oaks Road 
Waltham, 
MA 02154 
(617) 893-5900 

Macflecorder 

Farallon Computing 
2000 Powell St. 
Suite 600 
Emeryville, 
CA 94608 
(415) 596-9100 
$249 
Mac 



MIDIBASIC 

Altech Systems 

1 22 Faries 

Industrial Park Drive 

Shreveport, 

LA 71106 

(318) 226-1702 

$99.95 

Mac 

MIDI Interface 

Apple Computer Inc. 
20525 Mariani Ave. 
Cupertino. 
CA 95014 
(408) 996-1010 
(8001 776-2333 
$99 

GS or Mac 

MPU-401. 

$199.50 
Apple lie 
MIF-APL. 

$130 
Apple lie 
RolandCorp US 
7200 Dominion 
Circle 

Los Angeles, 
CA 90040 
(213] 685-5141 

Music Studio 2.0 

Activision 

3B85 Bohannon Drive 
Menlo Park, 
CA 94025 
(415) 329-0800 
available from 
mail-order sources 
GS 



Music Writer GS, 

$119 

Limited, 

$295 

Special, 

$595 

Professional 
Music Writer, 

$295 

Special, 

$595 

Professional 
Apple II 
Pygraphics 
R0. Box 639 
Grapevine, 
TX 76051 
(817) 481-7536 
(800) 222-7536 



Performer, 

$495 
Mac 

Professional 
Composer, 

$495 
Mac 

Mark of the Unicorn 
222 Third St. 
Cambridge, 
MA 02142 
(617) 576-2760 



Sound Tools with 
Sound Designer 

Digidesign 
1360 Willow Road 
Suite 101 
Menlo Park, 
CA 94025 
(415) 688-0600 
$3285 
Mac 



SynthLAB 

Apple Programmers 
and Developers 
Association 
(APDA) 

Apple Computer Inc. 
20525 Mariani Ave. 
MS-33G 
Cupertino, CA 
95014-6299 
(800) 282-2732 
$25 

APDA members only 
GS 

Vision 

Opcode Systems 
3641 Haven Drive 
Suite A 
Menlo Park. 
CA 94025 
£415) 369-8131 
$495 
Mac 



Voice Navigator II 

Articulate Systems 

99 Erie St. 

Cambridge. 

MA 02139 

(617) 876-5236 

$795 

Mac 



Yamaha Corp. 
of America 

RO. Box 6600 
Buena Park, 
CA 90622 
(714) 522-9011 



48 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 




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Easy and affordable 
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DON'T MISS: 

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FURTHER READING 

FEATURES 

"Making Music," August 19B7, p. 38 

"Apple Serenade," May 1988, p. 70 

"Face the Music," October 1989, p. 34 

"is it Live or Is It Apple !l?" August 1990, p. 52 

EDITORS' CHOICE 

Instant Music, October 1987, p. 144 

□iversi-Tune, September 1988, p. 1 12 

Sonic Blaster, May 1989, p. 108 

Instant Synthesizer, July 1989, p. 108 

Jam Session, March 1990, p. 108 

REVIEWS 

Phasor, March 1987, p. 24 

Personal Musician, February 19B8, p. 97 

FutureSound, March 1989, p. 32D 

Sound Ace, June 1989, p. 36 

Sonic Blaster, June 1989, p, 36 

Music Writer, June 1989, p. 40 

Music Shapes, June 1989, p. 40 

MasterTracks Jr., June 1989, p. 110 

Instant Synthesizer, September 1989, p. 28 

MasterTracks Pro GS, January 1990, p. 100 

LEARNING CURVE 

"Music to My Ears," September 1990, p. 88 



RESOURCES 

Computer Literacy for Musicians 

Fred Hofstetter 
$41 Prentice-Hall 



Electronic Musician magazine 

RO. Box 3747 

Escondido, CA 92025-9B60 

Keyboard magazine 

RO. Box 50404 
Boulder, CO B032 1-0404 



MIDI for Musicians 

Craig Anderton 
$16.95 Roland Corp. US 

Music Through MIDI 

Michael Boom 

$19.95 Microsoft Press 

What's a Synthesizer? 

Jon Eiche 

$5.95 Hal Leonard Books 



to snuff, but sometimes such error 
correction can give recorded music an 
awkward, mechanical feel. To avoid such 
lifelessness, some sequencer programs can 
randomize the timing slightly on playback 
to make the music sound more human. 
Or, of course, you can just turn quantiza- 
tion off and wing it. 

Sequencing options include Diversified 
Software's GS program Diversi-Tune for 
play-by-ear music amateurs. Apple's own 
sequencing program, SynthLAB, came 
and went in a storm of sound and fury 
that produced a special tool for GS MIDI 
programming (MIDI Synth) and a beta 
version that has never been finalized. 

SynthLAB turns your GS into a capable 
synthesizer via the machine's Ensoniq 
sound chip, and adds a stunted but func- 
tional sequencer. It's little more than an 
electronic multitrack tape deck — you can 
lay down up to 32 separate tracks, but you 
can't cut and paste sections, nor can you 
punch in and rerecord a section; you have 
to record the whole track over. 

One of SynthLAB's strengths is that it 
can handle MIDI data as a background 
event with the help of the MIDI Synth tool 
set, letting you work while your machine 
plays. MIDI Synth is part of Apple's 
System 5.0.4 update, and SynthLAB is 
available from APDA (Apple Programmers 
and Developers Association) in beta form. 

For budding Apple II composers, tran- 
scription programs — software that lets you 
enter your music note by note on screen, 
on traditional staves, and focuses more on 
music writing than performance — are a 
must. Activision's Music Studio for the 
GS is a good choice for beginners; it lets 
you edit each sound as well as your written 
notes. Music Writer, from Pygraphics' 
Pyware line in versions for the GS and the 
Ile/IIc, also includes a mini-sequencer 
and the ability to handle MIDI input; the 
program can even transcribe your 
synthesizer's music to a grand staff on 
screen as you play. 

For Mac music buffs, MIDI sequencers 
range from basic-level programs such as 
Passport's Trax, through more powerful 
programs such as Intelligent Music's Jam 
Factory and M, all the way up to high- 
end professional packages such as Pass- 
port's Pro4, Mark of the Unicorn's 
Performer, and Opcode's Vision. 



MIDI-compatible transcription prod- 
ucts for Mac musicians include Electronic 
Arts' Deluxe Music Construction Set for 
beginners, Passport's Encore (which tran- 
scribes to an on-screen staff as you play 
your synthesizer), Mark of the Unicorn's 
Professional Composer, and Coda's 
Finale for high-end projects. 

Of the mid-range packages available for 
the Mac, ConcertWare+MIDI from Great 
Wave Software is one of the most versa- 
tile. Most sequencing programs empha- 
size tracks and measures, but Concert- 
Ware+MIDI lets you work with musical 
notation. 

Once you have your basic song in 
memory, the software lets you can add 
dynamic markings, crescendos, repeats, 
and so on as you see fit, and print your 
completed score. 

ConcertWare+MIDI handles MIDI data 
flexibly, is especially good at dealing with 
polytimbral synthesizers, and even 
includes built-in "instrument maps" of 
some of the more popular synthesizers. 
(Each instrument within a synthesizer is 
assigned a number; an instrument map 
indicates which instrument within that 
particular synthesizer model is assigned 
which number.) The program's patch 
editor, Instrument Maker, offers both 
graphics-based and numeric control 
over waveforms and harmonics, and play- 
ing with them can be an entertaining 
lesson in sound theory. 

For those of you who want to try your 
hand at MIDI programming on the Mac, 
Altech Systems offers a package called 
MIDIBASIC, compatible with both 
Microsoft BASIC and Zedcor's ZBASIC 
computer languages. 

PUMP UP THE VOLUME 

It's true that you can get started making 
Apple music with just a bare-bones 
system, and there are a slew of compatible 
non-MIDI programs out there. Even a 
He can produce some entertaining tunes 
with a sound card plugged in; the GS 
is pretty versatile, too, with its built-in 
15-voice Ensoniq synthesizer chip. 

But if you love music, if you're serious 
about performance and composition, if 
you want to experiment with sound and 
push your instrument to the limit, the 
MIDI standard (especially for Macs) is the 



top of the line and you won't be satisfied 
with anything less. 

So come on! What are you waiting 
for? There's only one guitar named 
Lucille, and B.B. King isn't too fond of 
loaning her out. But plug yourself into 
a MIDI system, and you can act non- 
chalant and say things like "Yeah, me and 
M.C. — we got this MIDI thing down. 
Yo Apple! Drop the beat!" □ 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 49 



APPLEWORKS IN ACTION 



Ye Old 
Tax Tracker 

Get a head start on next year's return by 
using this spreadsheet to track deductible expenses. 



By RUTH K. W1TKIN 

WANT TO KNOW HOW TO BE YOUR 
own best friend? Keep track of tax-related 
expenditures all year long, so that when 
tax time comes you can calmly (calmly?) 
and rationally (rationally?) project your 
exposure or prepare your return. For 
instance, you may need to know how much 
you spent on medical and dental care, 
what you paid in state income tax, and 
your total contributions to charitable 
causes. All these amounts (and more) are 
deductible on your income tax return. 

Do you think you need a bloodhound to 
keep track of these items? Not at all. The 
powerful, easy-to-use spreadsheet in 
Figure 1 can do it for you. It takes the 
amounts you enter and distributes them into 
1 1 tax-deductible accounts, then sums the 
amounts in each account. (As always, kudos 
to my favorite tax consultant, George Stein, 
CPA, for expert advice given so graciously.) 

A SPREADSHEET FROM SCRATCH 

Create a new AppleWorks spreadsheet file 
named TAXTRACKER. The Review/Add/ 
Change screen appears with the cursor in 
cell Al. Create horizontal lines across 
columns A through R (162 characters). 
Going the normal AppleWorks route, you'd 
work in 78-character segments, typing 
quotation marks before each segment and 
doing lots of keystroking. There's an easier 
way: Simply reduce the width of the 



columns, enter each line (now shortened 
considerably) in one step, then widen the 
columns. Here's how: 

1. Narrow the columns: With the cursor 
on Al , press Open apple-L (OA-L) to start 
the Layout command, type C (for Columns), 
press OA-Right Arrow twice, then Right 
Arrow twice to highlight column R, and 
hit Return. Type C (for Column width), 
press OA-Left Arrow seven times to 
reduce the highlighted columns to two 
characters each, and hit Return again. 

2. Enter a double line across row 2 in 
columns A through R: Place the cursor on A2 
and type quotation marks to tell Apple- 
Works that the next character is a label, not a 
mathematical operator. Hold down the equal- 
sign key until the sign reaches the right edge 
of R2, then move the cursor to A6. 

3. Enter a single line across row 6 in columns 
A through R: With the cursor on A6, type 
quotation marks. Hold down the minus- 
sign key until the sign reaches the right edge 
of R6, then move the cursor to A35. Enter a 
single line in row 35 and hit Return. 

4. Widen the columns: With the cursor on 
A35, press OA-L, type C, press Right Arrow 
17 times, and hit Return. Type C, press 
OA-Right Arrow seven times, and hit 
Return again. AppleWorks now "stretches" 
the line to fill the increased width. 

This neat technique really shortens the 
time it takes to enter long lines. Tip: Don't 
reduce columns to less than two characters 
wide because AppleWorks won't stretch 



a line entered in one-character columns. 

Now use the following summary to 
continue the spreadsheet setup: 
Column width. Each column is now a 
uniform nine characters wide. Use OA-L, 
Columns, and Column width as follows: 
Reduce column A by two characters; 
column B by three characters; column C 
by six characters; column F by two char- 
acters; and column G by eight characters. 
Increase column D by 20 characters and 
column E by two characters. 

Column C prevents the right-justified 
numbers in column B from bumping into 
the left-justified text in column D, while 
column G is just wide enough to hold the 
vertical line separating entries in the tracker 
from the formulas in the accounts area. 
Vertical line. With the cursor in Gl, type 
quotation marks, hit the vertical line (it 
shares the backslash key), and press 
Return. Copy the line from Gl into G2 
through G36: Leave the cursor on Gl, 
press OA-C, hit Return to confirm Within 
worksheet, and press Return again to 
confirm Gl as the source. Move the cursor 
to G2 and type a period, then move the 
cursor to G36 and hit Return. 
Labels and numbers. Figure 2 shows the 
sample entries you type, but first here are 
a few instructions: 

• To tell AppleWorks that the 1991 in A4 
is a label, not a number, type quotation 
marks first. 

• Do the same in 1 1 , first making sure that 
columns I, J, and K are on screen so that 
AppleWorks can accept the entire title. 

• In E5, press the spacebar once after typing 
Amount. This space aligns the label with 
other labels when you right-justify later. 

To speed things up, turn off automatic 
calculation: Press OA-V and type RFM (for 
Recalculate Frequency Manual). 

Now enter the labels and numbers. 
After typing each entry, just move the 
cursor to the next cell needing an entry. 
This serves the same purpose as pressing 
Return, and saves one keystroke every 



50 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



==H====#=««=f>= 



TAX [EDUCTION TRACKER 



31 






Check or 


i 


Medical fed/tent 


Dental 


ttortgase Personal 


State Invest 


Moving 


Unrei* 


disc 


411991 


Cheek 




Allocated 


Acctl 


Payvefit Pre*Un 


Payewt 


Contrio Interest Prop Ta» 


Inc Tax Interest 


Exp 




Exp 


51 Data 




Issued To/Allocation 


Anoint 


Codel 


1 2 


3 




4 


7 8 


9 


10 


11 


jj 


























7IJafi t 


422 


Bl us Star Radical Insurance 


454.72 


2 1 


1 456,72 
















SlJan 2 


423 


County Personal Property Tax 


25,00 


6 1 








25.00 










?IJan 2 


424 


Shore 1 ine/rtartgage Interest 


77B.54 


5 1 






778,54 












131 Jan 2 


425 


American Ited Cross 


50.40 


4 I 


















i 1 1 Jan 2 


42b 


Professional Salesperson Assn 


125.00 


11 1 
















125.00 


l2IJait 5 


427 


Dr. David CaapbE'l 


75.00 


1 | 


75.00 
















131 Jan 5 


42S 


VistaEardVBusiness Entertain 


121, ?a 


10 1 














121 .?B 




Hljan 10 


434 


Shgrel in* Trust Safe Deposit 


34.00 


11 1 
















34.00 


151 Jw 12 


437 


Abner Health Pavilion 


25.00 


t 1 


25.00 
















l6IJan 12 


438 


JJ Brokerage 


40.00 


8 1 










40.00 








!7iJan 25 


442 


mc 


75.00 


4 1 






75.00 












ISIFet 2 


444 


Shore) ine/hcrt gage Interest 


77B.05 


5 1 






778.05 








132.00 




19!Fe6 3 


445 


VistaCard/Aaer Air-Cleveland 


n».oo 


10 j 
















20IFrt 17 


447 


VistaCsK/Hote) Cleveland 


132.00 


10 1 






777.55 










21 War 2 


456 


Shore) ine/hortgase Interest 


777.55 


5 1 












112.00 




22IIUT 15 


4*2 


AtEx press/Business Entertain 


112.00 


10 1 
















23INar 17 


463 


Est State Tax Install lent 


150.00 


7 1 
















24l(iar 26 


465 


Dr, Bernice Hantaick 


278.00 


3 1 




278.00 


25,00 












25!«ar 26 


46? 


Aimer Soys Club 


25.00 


4 1 
















26IApr 2 


46? 


Shoreline/ftarlgage Interest 


777.05 


5 1 






777,05 




125.00 








271 Apr 4 


470 


Balance 1991 State Tax 


125.00 


7 1 
















28iApr 4 


471 


Blue Star Bedical Insurance 


456,72 


2 1 


456.72 
















29fflpr 7 


472 


Dr. Bernice Hardnick 


75.00 


3 f 




75.00 


776.54 












30tBay 2 


48? 


Shore 1 ine/tlortgage Interest 


776,54 


5 i 














165.00 


31IHay23 


m 


Beirge Stein, CP.A.-Tax Prep 


165.00 


11 1 






776.03 










ttlJun 2 


499 


Sioreline/Hcrtgage Interest 


774.03 


5 1 








150.00 








33IJun IS 
341 


503 


Est State Tax Inst*l leent 


150.00 


7 1 
1 
















351 

m 




Totals 




1 

2 1 


100.00 913.44 


353.00 


150.00 4,663.76 


25,00 


425.00 40.00 


O.OO 


565.98 


324.00 



Figure 1. Completed tax-tracker spreadsheet. Highlighted areas show 
locations of formulas. 





11 




TAI SEDUCTION TRACKER 




1 


1991 BEDUCT10X ACCOUNTS 


2t=== 
31 






Check or 


Itledical 


hecYDent Dental Mortgage Personal State invest Moving Unreirt Disc 


411991 


Check 




Allocated Acct IPaytent 


Preaiua Payient Contrib Interest Prop Tax Inc Tax Interest Exp Ew Exp Exp 


SJDate 


Nuaoer 


Issued To/Allocation 


taunt Code 1 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


61 

7fJan 1 


422 


Blue Star Radical Insurance 


456.72 


2 1 




91 Jan 2 


423 


County Personal Property Tax 


25 


6 1 




9tJan 2 


424 


Slwrel ine/Mortg«e Interest 


778.54 


5 1 




101 Jan 2 


425 


Atari can fled Cross 


50 


4 1 




lllJan 2 


426 


Professional Salesperson flssu 


125 


[1 1 




121 Jan 5 


427 


Dr. David Cnpbell 


75 


1 1 




13IJan S 


428 


vistaCard/Business Entertain 


121.98 


SO 1 




14IJan 10 


434 


Shore) ine Trust Saie Deposit 


34 


11 1 




ISIJan 12 


437 


Abner Health Pavilion 


25 


1 1 




16IJan 12 


438 


JJ Brokerage 


40 


8 1 




171 Jan 25 


442 


PMC 


75 


4 1 




IBIfrt 2 


444 


Shore! ine/Jlortaaje Interest 


778.05 


5 1 




191 Feb 3 


445 


VistJCard/oJW Air-Cleveland 


200 


10 1 




20lfeb 17 


449 


VisU&rt/mrtel Cleveland 


132 


10 1 




2UMar 2 


456 


Shorel ini/H(rtg»ge Interest 


777.55 


5 1 




22lltar 15 


442 


Wipress/Business Entertain 


112 


10 1 




23lhar 17 


463 


Est State Tan Install eent 


150 


7 1 




24tltor 26 


465 


Dr. Bernice KaroVick 


278 


3 1 




25JMar 26 


467 


Abner Boys Club 


25 


4 1 




26IApr 2 


469 


Shorel ine/Morlgase Interest 


777.05 


5 1 




27IApr 4 


470 


Balance !?71 State Tax. 


125 


7 1 




28IApr 4 


471 


Blue Star nedical Insurance 


456.72 


2 1 




29iApr 7 


472 


Dr. Bernice Hsrdtiick 


75 


3 1 




30lltay 2 


4S9 


Shorel ine/Mortgage Interest 


776.54 


5 1 




3Hhay 23 


495 


Beorge Stein, C.P.A.-Tai Prep 


145 


11 1 




32IJun 2 


49? 


Shore) tne/Mortwge Interest 


776.03 


5 1 




33tJun 15 


503 


Est State Taj Instil lient 


150 


7 1 




341 












351 

361 




Totals 









Figure 2. Labels and numbers to type into tax-tracker spreadsheet. 



time. When you're finished, press Return. 
Formats. Use the Value command (OA-V) 
to set a standard Value format of Commas 
with two decimal places. Next, use the 
Layout command (OA-L) and Block to 
reformat the cells in rows 7 through 34 of 
columns B (Check Number) and F {Acct Code) 
to show Commas with no decimal places. 
Also use OA-L and Block to reformat H5 
through R5 with Appropriate. Use OA-L and 
Label format to right-justify E3 through F5, 
H3 through R4, and D36. Now press OA-S 
to store all your work on disk. 
Columns A through F are similar to a 



standard check ledger. They contain dates, 
check numbers, payees, amounts, and 
account numbers. The check numbers are 
only for reference. The account numbers 
determine the category into which the 
check amount is placed eventually. That's 
where the similarity ends. 

Here, you're not interested in every 
check written, only those fitting into 
tax-deduction accounts. For instance, you'll 
enter medical payments and charitable 
contributions, and omit checks for 
disability insurance and IRA contributions. 
Also, you're not concerned with the 



entire check amount, only that portion 
allocated to a tax-deductible account; 
you'll enter the entire Blue Star Medical 
Insurance check (#422), but only the 
interest part of the Shoreline Trust mort- 
gage-payment check (#424). The slash 
after Shoreline indicates a partial amount. 

Accounts 1 through 10 follow the IRS 
pattern and are self-explanatory. The Misc 
Exp account in column R holds such 
diverse items as union dues, business- or 
professional-association dues, work clothes, 
the cost of looking for a new job, job-agency 
fees, tax-advice and -preparation fees, and 
rental of a safe-deposit box. All these 
items, plus unreimbursed employee 
expenses (which appear here in their own 
column, but are normally part of Misc Exp) 
are subject to the 2 percent floor. 

Please note that not every conceivable 
deduction that could be taken on a tax 
return is mentioned here. Consult your 
tax adviser for any additional deductions to 
which you may be entitled. At the end of 
this article I describe how to add columns 
to hold them. 

Now enter the formulas that perform 
the calculations in columns H through R 
and in row 36. First read how the formula 
works, then place the cursor on the cell 
receiving the formula. Move the cursor to 
the cell location shown in the formula and 
type everything else. 

When the formula is complete, compare 
each character on your screen with the 
way it appears here. If everything agrees, 
press Return. If something's amiss, press 
Escape and start again. 
FORMULA 1: Medical Payment 

Cell location: H7 

Formula: @IF(F7=H5,E7,"") 
Formula 1 either enters the check amount 
or makes the cell appear empty (as it does 
in H7). The Test statement compares the 
account number (F7) with the account 
number in the column heading (H5). If 
they match, the Then statement copies the 
amount in E7 and enters it in its cell. No 
match, and the Else statement enters 
double quotation marks, essentially 
making the formula "disappear." 

Copy Formula 1 into the cells to the 
right, where each can match its own 
account number in the column heading 
to the account number in column F; Leave 
the cursor on H7 and press OA-C. Press &■ 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 51 



ApPT.FWORKS TN AfTTON 



Return twice (to confirm Within worksheet 
and Source). Move the cursor to 17, type a 
period, move the cursor to R7, and hit 
Return again. AppleWorks pauses with a 
highlight on F7 in the entry line, asking 
you to identify F7 as a No change (abso- 
lute) or Relative reference in its copied 
location. F7 and F.7 are absolute, while H5 
is relative, so press Return, type R, and hit 
Return again. Press OA-K to recalculate, 
which makes 456. 72 appear in 17. 

Now copy that row of Formula Is down 
their respective columns: With the cursor 
on H7, press OA-C and hit Return. Move 
the highlight to R7 and hit Return again. 
Press Down Arrow, type a period, move 
the highlight to H34, and hit Return. 

Again, AppleWorks asks you to identify 
absolute and relative cell references. This 
time type R, press Return, and type R again. 
As AppleWorks highlights each formula, 
hit the same keys: R, Return, and R. Now 
press OA-K again to display the numbers. 

Compare your results with those in 
Figure 1. If there's no match, check the 
construction of Formula 1 in H7, 
re-entering the formula and repeating the 
copy instructions if necessary. Now 
protect Formula 1 and all its incarnations: 
Place the cursor on H7 and press OA-L. 
Type B, press OA-8, then Down Arrow four 
times to reach H34. Then hit OA-Right 
Arrow once and Right Arrow enough times 
to reach column R. Hit Return, then type 
PN (for Protection Nothing). 
FORMULA 2: Total Amount 
Cell location: E36 
Formula: @SUM(E35.E6) 
Formula 2 adds the amounts in E34 
through E7 to produce the total in E36. 
The formula includes the lines in E35 and 
E6 to create a solid range. If you later 
insert new rows anywhere in this range, 
AppleWorks adjusts the cell references to 
add the new entries along with the old. 

Now copy Formula 2 into the account- 
total cells to the right: With the cursor on 
E36, press OA-C and hit Return twice. 
Move the cursor to H36, type a period, 
move the cursor to R36, and hit Return 
again. Press OA-R twice to tell AppleWorks 
both cells are relative. Press OA-K. Now 
protect these formula cells: Leave the 
cursor on E36 and press OA-L. Type R 
(for Rows — it doesn't matter that blank 
cells and the vertical-line cell G36 are 



included), and hit Return. Type PN. Press 
OA-S to store your work on disk. 

YES, IT DOES WINDOWS 

When you work on a spreadsheet as 
wide as this one, a second window that 
lets you view two diverse areas is a must. 
To see how this works, press OA-1, then 
position the spreadsheet so that column E 
{Check or Allocated Amount) is the first 
column on the screen. Now place the 
cursor in column H, press OA-W, and hit 
Return to confirm Side by side. AppleWorks 
creates two windows instantly — one 
containing amounts and accounts, the 
other containing account categories 1 
through 5. 

Suppose you want to see account 10, 
which should reflect the amount in F13: 
Press OA-Right Arrow twice, and there, in 
Q13, is 121.98. Scan categories 6 and 8, 
and you can see other amounts in their 
proper places. If you wanted to make 
changes in the amount or account, you 
could jump back and forth between the 
windows by pressing OA-J. Reunite the 
windows by pressing OA-W and hitting 
Return (for One). 

This spreadsheet is 163 characters wide, 
and prints on two sheets of paper. Press 
OA-O to bring up the Printer Options 
screen. To print as much as possible on 
the first sheet, choose a smaller character 
size: Type CI (for Chars per Inch) and press 
Return. Type 17 and hit Return again. 

Next, set the margins: Type LM (for Left 
Margin), press Return, type .3, and hit 
Return again. Now type RM (for Right 
Margin), press Return, type .3, and hit 
Return. Finally, type TM (for Top Margin), 
press Return, type .3, and hit Return once 
more. Press OA-S to store this final version on 
disk, and to return the spreadsheet to the screen. 

Turn on your printer and make a hard- 
copy of your spreadsheet: Leave the cursor 
where it is and press OA-P to bring up the 
Print screen. Hit Return to confirm AIL 
Press Return to select the printer (or type 
a printer number, then Return), type 
today's date (or, if your computer has a 
clock, type an asterisk @ to have Apple- 
Works enter the date for you), and hit 
Return twice. The printer chugs away, 
producing the spreadsheet. 

The best time to add more entry rows is 
when you're down to your last empty one. 



You can copy this row (with its formats and 
formulas, but without entries) to the clip- 
board, then copy it back into the spread- 
sheet. On this spreadsheet you've filled 
every available row but row 34. Here's how 
to use it to expand the entry section: 

1. Place the cursor on A34 and press OA-C. 

2. Select 7b clipboard and hit Return twice 
(to confirm Rows). 

3. Leave the cursor on A34 and press 
OA-C again. This time select From clip- 
board, then confirm Formulas and values. 

AppleWorks now inserts a brand-new 
row, ready for new entries. You can copy 
from the clipboard as many times as you 
want new rows and, each time you do, 
AppleWorks adjusts the cell references in 
the SUM formulas to include the new rows. 

If you need more account categories, 
the easy approach is to add them after the 
last category. Here are the steps: 

1. Place the cursor on Rl and press OA-C. 

2. Select To clipboard, type C (for Columns), 
and hit Return. 

3. Leave the cursor on Rl and press 
OA-C again. This time select From clip- 
board and confirm Formulas and values. 

4. Enter a new account name and number in 
the heading, and press OA-K to recalculate. 

You can copy from the clipboard as 
many times as you want new accounts. 
Keep in mind that entries in columns B 
and F are in a nonstandard format, which 
means that blanking them also blanks out 
their format. While this isn't the end of 
the world, reformatting them takes time. 
To avoid extra work, overtype (don't blank) 
and check numbers and account codes 
when editing this spreadsheet. 

NEXT MONTH 

If you're responsible for assigning 
people to client projects, allocating time 
for project phases, and coming up with 
a cost estimate, be sure to check out 
the project cost-estimate spreadsheet in 
next month's column. □ 



Contributing Editor Ruth K. Witkin is the 

AUTHOR OF THE SUCCESS WITH APPLEWORKS 

template series (lnCider/A+, IDG Communica- 
tions/Peterborough) and Ruth Witkin' s New 
AppleWorks Templates (Quality Computers). 
Write to her at 5 Patricia Street, Plainview, 
NY U803. Enclose a self- addressed, stamped 
envelope if you'd like a reply. 



52 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



Inawodd 
where fading 
Apple If 
hariwaie, software and 
support is difficult, 
fs nice to know 

there is 
one number 

that can help 
youfad 
it all. 

Circle 136 on Reader Service Card. 



1-8004^6697 - Intiodu 



Order it today 
Have it tomorrow 

We are pleased to introduce "Apple H®Oernight ™", the 
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Press room 



Desktop-Publishing 
Star Search 

Two inCider/A+ readers capture the spotlight 
with projects they've designed themselves. 



By CYNTHIA E. FIELD, Ph.D. 

HERE AT INCIDER/A + , WE DON'T 
believe in keeping talent a secret — espe- 
cially when it comes to great desktop- 
publishing projects. After all, hidden 
talent is nothing more than a waste of a 
good idea. So let's take a look at two 
projects inCider/A+ readers shared with 
us recently. First we'll show you how to 
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wedding — or any special occasion, for 
that matter. Practically all you need is a 
glue stick. Next we'll re-create letterhead 
and envelope templates designed by a pro- 
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or business correspondence, these tem- 
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PRECIOUS MEMORIES 

If you've ever planned a wedding, you 
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few weeks before their ceremony that they 
provide wedding programs to their 200 
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he didn't even flinch. Girard not only 
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"Julie created a few samples by hand to 



give me an idea how she wanted the pro- 
gram to look," says Girard, who prepared 
the publication's text with the AppleWorks 
3.0 word processor. After saving the word- 
processing file on a data disk, he started up 
Publish It! 3, added a couple of pages to the 
layout (Page menu), drew a text frame on 
each page (text tool), and then linked the 
frames (linking tool) to accommodate his 
imported AppleWorks file (File menu). 

Like many brides, Julie opted for an 
elegant script-like font, and she wanted 
some artwork on the program's cover. 
Girard chose the Kenilworth typeface from 
Timeworks' Font Pack 1, a Publish It! 
accessory product. He used the 36-point 
size for headings and the 18-point size for 
body text. The "lovebirds" illustration came 
from Dover's Ready-to-Use Wedding 
Illustrations. (See Figure 1.) Employing 
special fonts with Publish It! 3 is easy. Use 
the Install Font option listed in the Apple 
menu. In the publication-in-progress 
select the desired text with the mouse. Pull 
down the Font menu and choose Select Font. 

Formatting is even simpler. Select the 
text, pull down the Format menu, and 
choose Justification. That's how Girard 
arranged his program, including the 
centerfold featuring short "biographies" 




Edward & ^u£l£ 
Qctd&ei 1% fQQO 



"f.tt aH iAal yon da 

tr. </*„c wtUi fare.' 



V lb 'If 



7o Out J/W/lM, 



'/.., /<<!. <zr,J to mucA 



Figure 1. Placement of cover elements on photocopying 
master. The blank left-hand side forms the eighth page of 
the booklet; the right-hand side forms the cover. 



Figure 2. Girard glued the dedication on the back of Figure 

1. After folding the pages into a 5. 5 -by- 8. 5-inch booklet, 

the left side forms page 2 and the right side forms page 7. o 



56 * inCider/A+ • August 1931 



of the wedding party. (See Figures 1-4.) 

Girard saved his publication on disk and 
printed it on a dot-matrix printer in 
Publish It!'s best-quality mode. To further 
enhance appearance, he photocopied the 
pages at 80-percent reduction, which 
smoothly blended the dots making up 
each character. Next he separated the text 
areas with an X-acto-type knife and glued 
the panels in proper sequence onto both 
sides of two blank 8.5-by-l 1-inch sheets 
of paper. Figures 1 and 2 make up the 
front and back of one master sheet, and 
Figures 3 and 4 make up the front and 
back of the second master sheet. 

After photocopying these masters onto 
ivory-colored, linen-textured paper, Girard 
folded and stapled the sheets into two-page 
5. 5-by-8. 5-inch programs. (The blank left- 
hand side of Hgure 1 forms the eighth page 
of the booklet; the right-hand side forms 
the cover. The left-hand side of Figure 2 
forms the second page of the program; the 
right-hand side forms the seventh page. 
The right- and left-hand sides of Figure 3 
become pages three and six of the wedding 
program. Figure 4 forms the centerfold, 
pages four and five.) "Everyone thought 
the programs were done professionally," 
says Girard. "They certainly added an 
impressive touch to our wedding." 

PICTURE THIS 

Indiana reader Don Wood wasn't the 
photographer hired to shoot Edward and 
Julie's wedding in Texas, but he's logged 
many such occasions. For nearly a quarter 
century, Wood has been a professional 





LEFT 


TUr 






OTHER 


OBJECT 


ma mm 

START 


START 


WIDTH 


HEIGHT 


5PEGS 


Letterhead Objects 












GRAPHICS FRAMES: 












Lamera UertJ 


U, ell d 


U, 1 4/ 


A DC A 

1 .da! 


A AAA 




Camera [right) 


5.4S3 


0,209 


1 .851 


1.111 




Tr\n* rn a h iirt? . 












"Group Photography " labe! 


0, 250 


f-\ -toe 

0.735 


1 .795 


0.388 




Phone label 


0.23D 


A O "7 •— 1 

1 .372 


A *"1AA 

1 .241 


0.297 




ivDMie anu address 


C, O ! □ 


n pm 


C, I DO 




II aFlSpal BML 


"For the people" label 


5.281 


0.869 


1.277 


0.388 




Main lpt~t"pr appa 


0.250 


2.165 


7.245 


7.630 




SHAPES: 












Round corner box 

1 IUUI1U UUI MCI UUA 


2.75B 


0.109 


2.222 


1.093 


50% Fill 

wW lU 1 III 


Think rnlp 

[ 1 1 luf\ 1 UIC 


0.229 


2.250 


7.281 




Line Wetaht #3 


Envelope Objects 












GRAPHICS FRAMES: 












Apple lies graphic 


0.113 


1.350 


2.041 


1.750 




bamcra yrapflic 


U. JUu 




I , UHO 


n RA7 

U. O**/ 




TEXT FRAMES; 












Return-address label 


0.138 


0.370 


2.379 


0,929 




"Apple IIgs" label 


0.430 


2.333 


1.102 


0.240 




Addressee panel 


3.579 


2.125 


4.000 


1.000 





Table. Specifications for Don Wood's letterhead and envelope templates (in inches]. 



photographer at the "Photos by Don 
Wood" studio in Madison, Indiana. He 
also works full-time at the Madison Courier. 

When he's not busy playing photogra- 
pher, Wood turns to Publish It! 3 to 
design creations for his studio and his 
parish church's Knights of Columbus coun- 
cil. But Wood's letterhead and envelope 
templates impress us most, because they'll 
appeal to anyone who wants to spiff up cor- 
respondence the easy way. In the accompa- 
nying Table we provide the specifications 
for Wood's letterhead and envelope projects. 

Copying the letterhead design takes 
less than a half-hour. (See Figure 5.) Start 



up Publish It! 3 and press Open apple-4 
(OA-4) to work in Size to Fit mode. You'll 
use a half-dozen tools for this project, 
including the pointer, the graphics frame 
tool, the text tool, the I-beam, the round- 
corner box tool, and the line tool. 

As your design progresses, you'll want to 
switch from one viewing mode to another. 
Use the Special menu to choose the mag- 
nification you want, or try memorizing the 
faster keyboard commands OA-1 (Show Full 
Size) through OA-4. 

To begin, select the proper tool, draw 
the object, and make it conform to Wood's 
design. Select the object (click on it with 



Cddnation of ^THall 
and i&E sf^'dc of WHa'Hiajc 

/'.luvfj, 0/ tit, <Wo*J 

Join*" loCil 7 life ID, lie n 


^lit: tcMatliagc CciEtnonij 
^Uniting 




a&io-u/ So^k fyimj 


q^et "7w B>— 1 One &*!■/' 


Qcini^t 15, igqo 


2.00 fi.m. 


£>f AV*y of ttr 

tS.gn of <Pcact 


CAu^A 0/ tSt. BiiJ s H 



7>a,icnH of tke SWi: 
( Pai£nL J i of tfic C^iaam. 
srMaid of rlfonm 

EinJy £,„„, alUy C*, tdJ « 
?IHJ Jtcyn, »//r Jt isoramalt /mm 

Jut X'oSounlj. ftitnJ •>! fSi: t-udr 

^iirum ^nidc'i.mn.id 

tStf/Jiica g,ieiJ, Utotiti aj 1*1 Juki 



Ikz Wedding Party 

(^toomUncn 



JJuniot Cjioom'Lman 

i\,„» 9»™f«, /«>^ H«t™ 

./ t/ E j,™^ /,.». ?t.« 



f fitijf)oaid'i. 



0'iyanilt 



Figure 3. The text glued to the right- and left-hand sides 
of this master page become pages three and six of the 
wedding program. 



Figure 4. Girard glued the names of the wedding party 
to the back of Figure 3 to form pages four and five 
(the centerfold) of the master copy. 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ * 57 



the pointer) and press OA-M, or pull down 
the Objects menu and choose Show Specifi- 
cations. Edit the dimensions in the dialog 
box to match those in the Table. 

The letterhead template shows off some 
special Publish It! 3 features. For one, the 
text frame containing the studio's name and 
address is transparent. (Click on Transpar- 
ent in the object's Show Specifications dialog 
box). A transparent text frame prevents the 
rounded rectangle from masking the 
studio's name, or vice versa; instead, the 
shape shows through to enhance the text. 

Wood chose the outline type style (Font 
menu) to make his company's name stand 
out on its shaded background. He selected 
the 50% Fill swatch from the pattern 
palette (Objects menu) before drawing the 
round-corner box. 

Create the rule separating the letterhead 
area from the main text area below by 
selecting the third thickest line weight (#3) in 
the Set line Weight dialog box (Objects menu). 
Then draw the line with the line tool. Drag 
the line into position with the mouse, or use 
Shaw Spetifications and the Table data to snap 
the line into place automatically. 

When your letterhead design's com- 
pleted, save it as a template on a data disk. 
Print a copy using Publish Itl's double- 
strike printing mode, and consider 
duplicating the letterhead with a photo- 
copier. That way, you can use it not only 
with your desktop-publishing program, 
but with a word-processing program such 
as AppleWorks. Just friction-feed a sheet of 
letterhead into your printer and advance 
the page so that the printhead's just below 
the preprinted area. 

As an alternative, write your letters with 
Publish It! 3. Open the letterhead 
template, insert the I-beam into the large 
text frame, select a font, and type away. 
Better yet, compose your letter with the 
AppleWorks word processor, look over 
your typing with that program's spell 
checker, save the file, then import it into 
the Publish It! letterhead template. If you 



. plan to save a copy of the letter on disk, 
select the Save As feature (File menu) and 
type a unique name. 

As the screen dump shows, Don Wood's 
envelope template consists of a graphics 
area and two text frames. (See Figure 6.) 
One text frame accommodates the return 
address, the other the recipient's address. 
Wood designed a fairly complicated illus- 
tration for his envelope. Onto the under- 
lying computer clip art he superimposed 
a second graphics frame with a camera 
graphic and a text frame with the label 
"Apple IIgs." Your design needn't be that 
elaborate, but it's fun to explore the 
possibilities anyway. When your envelope 
template's completed, save it with a mean- 
ingful name on a data disk. 

Prepare a batch of preprinted envelopes 
like the one shown in Figure 7. Later on 
add the recipient's address with a type- 
writer, or use Publish It! to address a 
custom envelope for each letter you write. 

First, open the template, insert the 
I-beam into the addressee panel, and 
enter the recipient's name and address. 
Thanks to Publish It! 3*s Clipboard, you 
can even copy (OA-C) the recipient's 
address from the letter, close the letter 
file, open the envelope template, and 
paste (OA-V) the address into the 
addressee panel. Why type the same thing 
twice? Experiment with various fonts and 
formatting options before printing your 
envelopes. We discovered that centered 
addresses are a nice touch. 

Insert a #10 business envelope into 
the printer as you would an ordinary 
sheet of paper. Line up the left edge of 
the envelope with the single-sheet icon 
on the ImageWriter II's back cover and 
press the form-feed button once to 
advance the envelope to the top-of-page 
setting. Because most envelopes are 
thicker than computer paper, you may 
want to move the printer's paper-thick- 
ness lever down a notch or two to prevent 
jamming. Use similar methods to orient 



PRODUCT INFORMATION 



AppleWorks 3.0 

Claris Corporation 

5201 Patrick Henry Drive 

R0. Box 581 68 

Santa Clara. CA 95052-8168 

(408) 727-8227 

$249 



Publish It! 3, $129.95 
Font Packs 1 and 2. 

$39.95 each 
Timeworks Inc. 
625 Academy Drive 
Northbrook, IL 60062 
(708) 559-1300 



Ready-to-Use 
Wedding illustrations 

Dover Publications 
31 East 2nd Street 
Mineola. NY 11501 
[516)294-7000 
$3.95 




Figure 5. Don Wood's letterhead. 



i fife Hi fit fye Dtjuts Spuial Htfc 




Figure 6. Screen dump showing Don 
Wood's envelope design with addressee- 
panel text frame. 




Figure 7. Don Wood's envelope design. 

envelopes in other printer models. 

Whether you're planning a special cele- 
bration or designing custom stationery, 
Publish It! 3 and an Apple II are the per- 
fect match. If you've created something 
special with your Apple II or Macintosh 
and would like us to consider sharing it 
with other Press Room readers, send us 
printouts and a copy of the file(s) on disk. 
Include a cover letter telling us a little bit 
about your project. We'll drop you a line to 
let you know what we think. 

Who knows? We might even design 
a new letterhead template just for the 
occasion! □ 

Write to Cynthia E. Field at 60 Border 
Drive, Wakefield, RI 02879. Enclose an SASE 
if you'd like a personal reply. 



58 • rnCider/A+ • August 1991 



YOU ASKED FOR IT. 



YOU GOT IT! 



•YOU WANTED FAS-TRACK'S TOLL-FREE TECH SUPPORT. 

•YOU WANTED SCHOOL PO's WELCOME. 

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7030C HUNTLEY RO AD • COLUMBUS, OHIO 



3 2 2 9 



Circle 85 on Reader Service Card. 



Applesoft adviser 



Bit-Map 

Attack 

What good are all those graphics images 
if you have to annotate them from the text window? 



By DAN BISHOP 

YOUR MONITOR SEEMS TO SNEER 
as you look up blearily from the program 
you Ve been slaving over for weeks. On 
screen, four images of temptingly realistic 
fruit rotate slowly. Your instructional 
program on the mangoes of Southern Fiji 
is perfect, except for one detail: You need 
to label the drawings — but all you have to 
work with is the four-line text window at 
the bottom of the screen. Your hands 
crash down on the keyboard in frustra- 
tion, sending up a shower of Doritos and 
splinters of plastic. You're a master of 
graphics programming, but the ability to 
place text in a graphics window remains 
beyond your reach. 

Last time, in "Smashing the Hi-Res 
Barrier" (April 1991, p. 70), you learned a 
method for converting the high-resolution 
page 2 graphics screen to mixed text-and- 
graphics mode and to POKE text into mem- 
ory so that it would appear in this window. 

This month we'll throw mixed mode out 
the window (pun intended) and develop a 
method for creating text anywhere on the 
graphics screen, so that you can use full- 
screen graphics and still incorporate text. 
This technique lets you create your own 
style of text characters, or engineering, 
mathematical, or chemical symbols. To 
illustrate this capability, we'll provide the 
code needed for both English and Cyrillic 
(Russian) alphabets. What could be more 



appropriate in this age of glasnosi than 
teaching your Apple II to speak Russian? 

DEFINING THE CHARACTERS 

Although you could use shape tables to 
define and use graphics characters, there's 
an easier method. (See "Command 
Performance," November 1990, p. 70, for 
details on using shape tables.) Instead of 
using vectors, you'll define each charac- 
ter by eight numbers that represent the 
lighted pixels (dots) in each of the eight 
rows of a character block. You'll then 
POKE these values into RAM for safe stor- 
age before you run your graphics 
program, then copy the values as needed 
directly onto the graphics screen. What 
makes this procedure possible is the fact 
that the Apple hi-res graphics screens are 
bit-mapped, meaning that every pixel 
corresponds to a single bit in RAM. 

Starting with a sheet of graph paper, 
mark off a block with seven vertical 
columns and eight horizontal rows. Each 
square represents a pixel on the graph- 
ics screen. Each graphics object (character 
or symbol) must fit within this grid, 
although you can piece together larger 
objects by displaying several of these 
blocks side by side. Number each column 
at the top of the grid with a column value, 
starting at the left. These column values 
are 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64. Draw the 
desired object by shading squares on the 
grid. (See Figure 1.) 



Each of the eight rows will have a value 
that's determined by the position of the 
shaded squares in that row. To find the 
value for a given row, add the column 
values for each shaded square. In Figure 1, 
for example, the top row has only the third 
square shaded, so its row value is 4. The 
fifth row has the first five squares shaded, so 
its row value is 31 (1 + 2 + 4 + 8 + 16). 
Continue through your alphabet or symbol 
list and convert every object you draw into 
a sequence of eight row values, listing the 
top-row value first. 

In Listing 1 , the first DATA line has 
only a single entry that tells your Apple 
II the number of characters you'll define. 
The rest of the DATA lines each define a 
single character. Nine values are listed for 
each character. The first DATA value 
determines the RAM location where you'll 
store that character. The second through 
ninth values are the eight row values that 
define the character, as described above. 

Although you could store this data in 
any RAM location that's not in use, I 
reserve the locations above 36000 by 
employing a HIMEM:36000 call at the 
start of the program. Because I'm storing 
data corresponding to alphabetic and 
keyboard characters, I list them in their 
ASCII code order; that way the computer 
can calculate the starting memory location 
for each character from its ASCII code. 
For the English and keyboard characters, 
the formula is Location — 36000 + 8 * 
(ASCII value -32). For the Russian char- 
acters, the formula is Location — 36760 + 
8* (ASCII value -64). 

These formulas make calling up a char- 
acter easy. You can also write a simple 
subroutine to have the Apple II calculate 
a character's location and display the char- 
acter at a designated spot on screen 
automatically. (See Listing 2.) 

By using HIMEM:36000, your Apple II 
will store all program variables below 
36000 — the only concern you have is 
keeping your program from growing too 



BO • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



large. If you need to, you can make 
appropriate adjustments in these values 
to get everything to fit into memory. Just 
be sure to change the location formulas 
to match your choice of value for HIMEM. 

POKEING DATA INTO RAM 

Listing 1 is basically a subroutine (lines 
1200-1245) that READs each character's 
DATA statement, calculates the proper 
RAM location, and POKEs in the eight row 
values that follow. For each character, your 
Apple II reads the memory-location index 
as M, then uses a loop (FOR J=0 TO 7) to 
read each of the row values, and POKEs 
these values into RAM locations calculated 
as 36000 + M + J. Because the values for 
M in each DATA statement increment by 
eight, no two characters will occupy the 
same area of RAM. As written, Listing 1 
has 128 total characters. If you want to use 
only the English and keyboard characters, 
change line 1300 to DATA 95 and delete 
lines 1795 to 1955. You can reduce Listing 



1 further by changing line 1300 to DATA 
64 and deleting lines 1625 to 1790 if you 
don't need lowercase letters. 

You could include Listing 1 in your 
graphics program as a subroutine, but this 
would waste a lot of space. Because the 
character POKEd into RAM will stay there 
until you turn off the computer, you might 
prefer to keep Listing 1 separate and run 
it before your graphics programs. You can 
then chain from this program into your 
first graphics program, making it seem as 
if there's only one. Listing 1 connects to 
a second program at line 40 with a PRINT 
CHR$(4);"RUN RUSSIAN ONE" com- 
mand. Be sure to use RUSSIAN ONE as 
the file name for Listing 2 if this feature is 
to operate as written. 

DISPLAYING THE CHARACTERS 

Listing 2 demonstrates how to display 
these graphics characters in the graphics 
window. (You must run Listing 1 before 
executing Listing 2, though. And if you've 



shortened Listing 1, the undefined char- 
acters will appear as meaningless smudges 
on screen when you call them.) When you 
run Listing 2, the computer draws two 
pictures and labels them in English and 
Russian. Then it displays two simple 
Russian sentences along with their English 
translation and a pronunciation guide (in 
lowercase) to the Russian words. 

First, we must retreive the bit maps from 
memory, then we can worry about plac- 
ing them on the graphics screen. You must 
assign each word or phrase you want to 
display in the graphics window to the 
string variable, Z$; each object must 
correspond to a keyboard character. The 
retrieval subroutine begins with lines 900 
and 905 of Listing 2; at this location set K, 
the character-set flag, to either or 1 
depending on whether you want English 
or Russian characters, respectively. We also 
set the blank flag, B, to 0. If BK=0, and 
the character you send is "space" (ASCII 
32), line 916 will skip the part of the 



Listing 1. HI-RES CHARACTERS. This program POKEs 
English upper- and lowercase characters, keyboard 
symbols, and Russian uppercase characters into RAM, 
then chains into the program RUSSIAN ONE (Listing 2). 

1 REM HIRES CHARACTERS 

2 REM BY DAN BISHOP 

3 REM A+ INCIDER 

4 REM ******************** 

5 REM THIS UTILITY POKES CHAR- 

6 REM ACTERS & SYMBOLS DEFINED 

7 REM IN THE DATA STATEMENTS 

8 REM INTO RAM FOR HIRES USE. 

9 REM ******************** 

10 HIMEM: 36000 
15 HOME 

20 VTAB 12 

25 PRINT "LOADING CHARACTER DEFINITIONS INTO RAH." 
30 G0SUB 1200 

35 PRINT : PRINT "FINISHED. " 

40 PRINT CHR$ (4); "RUN RUSSIAN. ONE" 

100 END 

1200 READ N 

1205 FOR I = 1 TO N 

1210 VTAB 15: PRINT "WORKING ON CHARACTER "I" OUT OF "N" . " 

1215 READ M 

1220 FOR J - TO 7 

1225 READ C 

1230 POKE 36000 + M + J,C 
1235 NEXT J 
1240 NEXT I 
1245 RETURN 
1300 DATA 128 

1305 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0: REM BLANK 
1310 DATA 8,4,14,14,4,0,4,4,0: REM ! 
1315 DATA 16,10,10,0,0,0,0,0,0: REM " 
1320 DATA 24,10,10,31,10,31,10,10,0: REM # 
1325 DATA 32,4,30,5,14,20,15,4,0: REM $ 



Listing 1. (Continued] 



1330 DATA 40,3,19,8,4,2,25,24,0: REM % 

1335 DATA 48,2,5,5,2,21,9,22,0: REM & 

1340 DATA 56,4,4,4,0,0,0,0,0: REM ' 

1345 DATA 64,4,2,1,1,1,2,4,0: REM ( 

1350 DATA 72,4,8,16,16,16,8,4,0: REM ) 

1355 DATA 80,4,21,14,4,14,21,4,0: REM * 

1360 DATA 88,0,4,4,31,4,4,0,0: REM + 

1365 DATA 96,0,0,0,0,8,8,4,0: REM COMMA 

1370 DATA 104,0,0,0,31,0,0,0,0: REM - 

1375 DATA 112,0,0,0,0,0,0,4,0: REM PERIOD 

1380 DATA 120,0,16,8,4,2,1,0,0: REM / 

1385 DATA 128,14,17,17,17,17,17,14,0: REM 

1390 DATA 136,4,6,4,4,4,4,14,0: REM 1 

1395 DATA 144,14,17,16,15,12,3,31,0: REM 2 

1400 DATA 152,15,16,16,12,16,16,15,0: REM 3 

1405 DATA 160,12,10,9,9,31,8,8,0: REM 4 

1410 DATA 168,31,1,1,15,16,16,15,0: REM 5 

1415 DATA 176,30,1,1,15,17,17,14,0: REM 6 

1420 DATA 184,31,8,4,2,1,1,1,0: REM 7 

1425 DATA 192,14,17,17,14,17,17,14,0: REM 8 

1430 DATA 200,14,17,17,30,16,8,7,0: REM 9 

1435 DATA 208,0,0,4,0,4,0,0,0: REM : 

1440 DATA 216,0,0,4,0,4,4,2,0: REM ; 

1445 DATA 224,16,8,4,2,4,8,16,0: REM < 

1450 DATA 232,0,0,31,0,31,0,0,0: REM = 

1455 DATA 240,2,4,8,16,8,4,2,0: REM > 

1460 DATA 248,14,17,8,4,4,0,4,0: REM ? 

1465 DATA 256,14,17,21,29,13,1,30,0: REM @ 

1470 DATA 264,4,10,17,17,31,17,17,0: REM A 

1475 DATA 272,15,17,17,15,17,17,15,0: REM B 

1480 DATA 280,14,17,1,1,1,17,14,0: REM C 

1485 DATA 288,15,17,17,17,17,17,15,0: REM D 

1490 DATA 296,31,1,1,7,1,1,31,0: REM E 

1495 DATA 304,31,1,1,7,1,1,1,0: REM F 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 61 



Applesoft adviser 



Listing 1. (Continued) 



i caa 
IbUU 


AATA 

UA 1 A 


7 10 

j lc 


1/117 11 OQ 17 m r\. DCM c 
14, 1/ » 1 , 1 , cM t if , JU,U : Ktrl b 


i cac 
Ibub 


UA 1 A 


7 on 


17 17 17 01 17 17 77 A* DCM LI 

1/ , 1/ » 1/ ,51 » 1/ , 1/ , 1/ ,u: KtM H 


lb 1U 


nATA 
UA 1 A 


770 


1/1/1/1/1/1/11/1 A* D[TM T 
14 , 4 , 4 , 4 , 4 , 4 , 14 , U t KLn 1 


1 C 1 c. 
ID ID 


UR 1 M 


77C 


£.0,0,0,0,0,3,0,11; Ktn J 


1 COA 


nflTA 

UA 1 A 


7/1 /] 
J44 


1 7 O C 7 C Q 1 7 fl ■ DCM V 

i/,y,b,j,D,y,i/,u: Ktn it 


1 COC 

lb<:b 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


7CO 


11111171(7. DCM 1 

1,1,1,1,1,1,^1^: KbM L 


IS 5v 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


tca 
3bU 


17 07 01 17 17 17 17 A. DCM M 

1/ ,// fCl , 1/ , 1/ , 1/ , 1/ ,U: KtM M 


1535 


DATA 


7 CO 

3bo 


17 17 ID 01 OC 17 17 A. nru hi 

l/,J/,iy,^l,c:D,l/,l/,u: KtM N 


1 E A A 


RATA 

UA 1 A 


77£ 
5ft 


1A 77 1 7 77 1 7 1 7 1 ^ A. DCM fi 

14, 1/, it , 1/ , 1/ , 1/ , 14, U: KtM U 


1d4d 


RATA 

UA 1 A 


7 Q/l 


1C 17 17 1C 1 1 1 H. DCM D 

lb, if , 1/ , ID, 1 , 1, 1,U: KtM r 


i cca 
IbbU 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


7no 
5 l Jc 


1 /1 17 17 17 01 00 A. D CM A 

14, if , 1 / , 1/ ,<;! ,y ,£i:,U: KtM u. 


i c c f; 
lbbb 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


4UU 


1 c 77 17 IE c Ci 17A. DCM D 

lb, 11, li , lb,b,y, If ,U: KtM K 


7 c cn 
IbbU 


DATA 


408 


1A 77 1 1/1 1£ 17 7/1 n. D CM C 

14, I/, 1,14, lb, 1/, 14, U: KtM i 


IDDD 


HATA 

UA 1 A 


/lie 
4 Id 


71 A A A A A A A* DCM T 

Jl, 4, 4,4,4,4,4,1): KtM 1 


Ib/U 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


AO A 


17 17 17 17 17 17 1/1 A- DCM II 

If , 1 / , 1/ , 1/ , 1/ , 1 / , 14 ,U: KtM U 


1 r 7 r 
ID/ D 


RATA 

UA 1 A 


A oo 
"tic 


1 7 17 07 If! 1 A A A n. DCM 1/ 

If , 1! ,cl , 1U, 14,4, 4, U: KtM V 


1 con 
IboU 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


A AA 

44U 


17 17 17 17 01 07 17 A* DCM U 

1} ,lf , If , If ,£.!,£.!, If KtM W 


IDOD 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


A AQ 

44B 


17 07 1/1 A 1/1 77 17 A. DCM V 

1/ , c f , 14 ,4, 14 , If , 11 ,U : KtM X 


1590 


DATA 


456 


17 17 1A/1 A A /i n. rj CM V 

1/,1/, 111,4,4,4,4,0: KtM Y 


Ibyb 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


AC/1 

4b4 


71 1CQA0 1 71 0. DCM 7 

il,lb,o,4,i,l,il,U: KtM Z 


IbUU 


hata 
UA 1 A 


HI C 


7 1 1 1 1 1 7 A. DCM 1 CfT OOAri/CT 
1,1, 1,/,U: KtM Ltr 1 oKALKtl 


i cnc 
Ibub 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


a qa 
4oU 


A 7 A O 1C A A. DCM OhCV CI ACU 

U, ,4,o, lb,U,U: KtM BALK oLAbn 


if in 

IblU 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


A QQ 
400 


OQ 1C 1C 1C 1 fi 1C 00 A. DCM DTTUT DDAfLTT 

to, 10, 10, 10, 10,1b ,Co,M. KtM Klbnl bKALKt 1 


IblD 


nATA 
UA 1 A 


A QC 


a in 17 a n n n a* dcm taddat 
4 , 1U , 1 / , U , U, U , U , U : Ktn LAKKUI 


1 con 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


caa 
bU4 


AAnAAnnoi. dcm iimacdi tmc 
U,U,U,U,(J,U,U, 51 : KtM UNUtKLlINt 


1 co c 
Ib^b 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


con 
b^U 


A A 1A 1C 7A 17 70 A. DCM ^ 

U , U, 14 , lb , jSU, 1 / , 5u , Lt: KtM a 


1 cta 
lb JU 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


COD 

bto 


1 1 1 C 17 17 17 1C A. DCM h 

1 , 1 , lb , 1/ , 1 / , 1 / , lb , U: KtM D 


i C7c 
lb.ib 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


t 7C 

boo 


n n 7A 1 1 1 7A fit DCM n 

U , U, JU , 1 , 1 , 1 , jUjl) : Ktn C 


i caa 


nATA 
UA I A 


CAA 
044 


1 c 1 c m 17 17 17 7A A. DCM A 

10, 10, JU, 1 / , If , I / , JU ,u : Ktn u 


1 C/T C 

lb4b 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


CCO 

ddc 


A A 1A 17 71 1 7A A. DCM ^ 

U,U,14 i 1/,J1 i 1 i jU,U: KtM e 


IbbU 


nATA 
UA 1 A 


DOU 


10 1Q0 ICO 00 fli DCM -F 
l£,lo,£,l~),C,t.,t.,u. Ktn T 


1 etc 
lbbb 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


ceo 

boo 


A A 1/1 17 17 7A 1C 1/1- DCM n 

U , U , 14 , if , If , S\J, ID , 14 : KtM g 


1 CCA 

IbbU 


nATA 

UA1 A 


E7C 

b/b 


1 1 IE 17 17 17 17 A» DCM k 

l , 1 , lb , if , 1/ , 1/ , if ,U: KtM n 


1 ccc 


nATA 
UA I A 


CQA 

D04 


a n C A /! A 1 /I n . DCM i 
4, U, 0,4, 4,4, 14, U! Ktn 1 


i C7A 
Ib/U 


nATA 

UA) A 


by^ 


QniODOQQC. DCM i 

o,U,lc:,o,o,o,y,o: KtM j 


1 C7 C 
lb/ 


nATA 

UA i A 


enn 


1 1 Q R 7 C Q A- DCM 1/ 


1 con 
lOOU 


hata 

UA 1 A 


CAP. 


C/1AA/1A 7AA- DCM 1 
,4 , 4 , 4 ,4 , 4 , 14 ,U : Ktn 1 


IbOD 


nATA 

UA I A 


C 1 c 

tub 


n n 07 71 71 71 17 A* DCM m 

U,U,c/,c:l,<:l,£;l,l/,U: KtM rn 


i eon 


UA 1 A 


CO/! 


A n 1C 17 17 17 17 A. DCM n 

u,u , lo, if , if , i /, if ,u: KtM n 


1 CQC 

ioy b 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


COO 
OJC 


A A 1/1 17 17 17 1/1 A. DCM n 

U,U, 14,1/ , if , 1/, 14, U: KtM 


1 7nn 
1/UU 


n A TA 

UA 1 A 


04(J 


AA1C17 17 1C1 1. DCM 

U,U, lb,l/ , If ,1b, 1 , i: KtM p 


1 7AE 

1 / Ub 


nATA 
UA 1 A 


04o 


A A 7A 17 77 7A 1C 1C, DCM n 
U,U,JU,l/,l/,JU,l0,ib: KLM q 


i 7 1 a 
1/ 1U 


nATA 

UA1 A 


obb 


AA0Q7 1 1 in. DCM 

U,u,Zy,j,l,l,l,u: KtM p 


171 r 

1/ lb 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


CCA 


n A 7A 1 1/1 1C 1C A. DCM r 

U,U, jU, 1, 14, lb, lb, U: KtM s 


1 70A 
ifcu 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


C70 

bfc 


00 1C 00 7D10A. DCM -1- 

c,c , lb,*., c. , io, ic. ,U: KtM t 


1 /ib 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


c on 
boU 


A A 17 17 17 OC 00 A. DCM n 

U,U, 1/ , 1/ , if ,c!3,cc ,(J; KtM U 


1 77H 


nATA 
UA 1 A 


coo 

boo 


n A 17 17 17 1A /l A* DCM w 

U,U,l/,l/,l/,lU,4,u: Ktn V 


1 7 7 C 
1/ JD 


nATA 
UA 1 A 


CQC 

oyb 


A A 17 17 01 01 07 A. DCM \.t 

u,LJ,l/,l/,ti,£l,c/,u: Ktn w 


1/4U 


HATA 

UA 1 A 


7AA 
/U4 


n a 17 in a in 17 a. dcm ^ 
U,U, 1/ , 1U,4, 1U , If ,U: KtM X 


l/4b 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


7 10 
/ IC 


A A 17 17 17 7A 1C 7/1. DCM w 

u , [), if , if , 1 1 , ju, lb , 14 : KtM y 


1 Ten 

1/bU 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


Ton 
/ cU 


A A 77 DA 7 71 A. DCM -r 

U,Uj jl,0,4,Z» jl,U: KtM Z 


1755 


DATA 


728 


70 C C 7 C d OO A. DCM / 

£0,0,0, J,o,b,<:o,u: KtM 1 


1 7 cn 
1 / DU 


nATA 
UA 1 A 


77c 

1 5b 


/1/1AA/1/1AA.DCM 1 
4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4: Ktn | 


1 7CC 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


7 A/1 

/44 


7 17 10 OA 10 10 7 A. DCM \ 

/ , ic , llfC 1 *, 1c, ic , / ,U : KtM J 


1 770 
1 / /U 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


C 1 
bi.lL 


CO CC OC CC QC 07 CC CO. DCM tIAODV CArc 

bi,bb,ob ,ob,ob,yj,bb,oi:: KtM HArKi rALt 


1 77C 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


7 CO 

foe 


CO CC QC CC CC H7 DC CO • DCM CDAUM CATC 

Dd,0D,ob,0D,Db,yj,O3,0<;: KtM f-KUWN l-ALt 


1795 


DATA 


760 


7A 77 17 OA OA 1Q 17 A. DCM V A U 

dU, If, If, 5H,cU, 1E5, if ,U: KtM YAH 


1 Qnn 
loUU 


RATA 

UA 1 A 


7 CO 


A 1A 17 17 71 17 17 A. DCM AU 

4 , 1U, 1 / s 1 / ,51 , if , 1 / ,U: KtM An 


1 one 
loub 


UA I A 


1 1 D 


7 1 1 1 1 C 17 17 IC A- DCM DAV 
J 1 , 1 , 1 , 1 b , 1 / , 1 / , ID , U . Ktn DAT 


1 di n 
iolU 


DATA 

UA 1 A 


7 Q/l 


17 17 17 7A IC IC IC A. DCM TUAV 

1/ , if , 1/ , jU, 10, 10, lD,U: KtM LHAY 


1C1 K 

lolb 


HATA 
UA 1 A 


70"? 

/ yc 


i/i in in in in 7i 17 n. dcm nav 
14 , i\l , 1U , 1U , 1U , 1 , 1 / , u . Ktn UA 1 


1820 


DATA 


800 


31,1,1,7,1,1,31,0: REM YAY 


1825 


DATA 


808 


4,14,21,21,21,14,4,0: REM EF 


1830 


DATA 


816 


31,1,1,1,1,1,1,0: REM GAY 


1835 


DATA 


824 


0,17,17,17,23,21,23,0: REM YERRI 


1840 


DATA 


832 


17,17,25,21,19,17,17,0: REM EE 


1845 


DATA 


840 


73,42,42,28,42,42,73,0: REM ZHAY 


1850 


DATA 


848 


17,9,5,3,5,9,17,0: REM KAH 


1855 


DATA 


856 


28,20,20,20,20,21,23,0: REM EL 


1860 


DATA 


864 


17,27,21,17,17,17,17,0: REM EM 



Listing 1. (Continued] 



1 DCC 

lobb 


A AT A 

DAI A 


1 07A 

lo/U 


nATA 
UA 1 A 


1 Q7C 

lo/b 


HATA 

UA1 A 


1 QQA 


nATA 
UA 1 A 


loob 


nATA 

UAi A 


1 QAA 


DA! A 


1 one 

it>yb 


nATA 
UA 1 A 


1 AAA 

iyuu 


nATA 

UA 1 A 


iyub 


DATA 


1910 


DATA 


1915 


DATA 


1920 


DATA 


1925 


DATA 


1930 


DATA 


1935 


DATA 


1940 


DATA 


1945 


DATA 


1950 


DATA 


1955 


DATA 



872,17,17,17,31,17,17,17,0: REM EN 
880,14,17,17,17,17,17,14,0: REM OH 
888,31,17,17,17,17,17,17,0: REM PAY 
896,17,17,21,21,21,21,63,48: REM SHCHAH 
904,15,17,17,15,1,1,1,0: REM EHR 
912,14,17,1,1,1,17,14,0: REM ES 
920,31,4,4,4,4,4,4,0: REM TAY 
928,29,21,21,23,21,21,29,0: REM YOU 
936,15,17,17,15,17,17,15,0: REM VAY 
944,17,17,21,21,21,21,31,0: REM SHAH 
952,17,27,14,4,14,27,17,0: REM KHAH 
960,17,17,18,20,12,4,3,0: REM 00H 
968,14,17,16,12,16,17,14,0: REM ZAY 
976,0,1,1,1,15,9,15,0: REM M.ZNAKH 
984,14,17,16,30,16,17,14,0: REM EB0R0TN0E 
992,0,3,2,2,14,10,14,0: REM T.ZNAKH 
1000,10,4,17,25,21,19,17,0: REM EKRATKOE 
1008,10,0,31,1,15,1,31,0: REM YOH 
1016,17,17,17,17,17,17,63,48: REM TSEH 



Listing 2. RUSSIAN ONE. A beginning Russian-language 
lesson that illustrates the mixing of English and Russian 
graphics characters with hi-res graphics. 



1 REM RUSSIAN ONE 

2 REM BY DAN BISHOP, APPLESOFT ADVISOR 

3 REM A+ INCIDER, MARCH 1991 

4 REM ************************** 

5 REM 

10 HIMEM: 36000 

15 H6R2 : HC0L0R= 7 

20 GOSUB 1200: GOSUB 1100 

25 GOSUB 1000: GOSUB 1100 

30 TEXT : HOME 

99 END 

889 REM 

890 REM ********************* 

891 REM ROUTINES TO PEEK AND 

892 REM POKE CHARACTERS 

893 REM FROM RAM. ENGLISH 

894 REM CHARACTERS USE K=0 AND 

895 REM RUSSIAN CHARACTERS 

896 REM USE K=l 

897 REM ************************** 

898 REM 

900 K = 0:BK = 0: GOTO 910 
905 K = 1:BK - 0: GOTO 910 
910 FOR R = 1 TO LEN (Z$) 

915 Z% = ASC ( MID$ (Z$,R,1)) 

916 IF Z% = 32 AND BK = GOTO 950 



920 KZ = 64:KL = 760: IF Z 
925 Z = 8 * (Z% - KZ) 
930 FOR RJ = TO 7 
935 RV = PEEK (36000 + KL 
940 POKE L + 1024 * RJ,RV 
945 NEXT RJ 
950 L = L + 1 
955 NEXT R 
RETURN 

FOR I = 1 TO 1000: NEXT 
RETURN 

REM ******************* 

REM 2 RUSSIAN SENTENCES 
p^f/] **************+**** 

1000 Z$ = "I AM WORKING 
1005 L = 16384: GOSUB 900 
1010 ZS = "0 RABOTAU 



64 OR K = THEN KZ - 32 : KL = 



Z + RJ) 



960 
990 
995 
996 
997 
998 



AT 



NA 



THE FACTORY. " 



ZAVODE. 



62 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



Listing 2. (Continued} 




1015 L = 16640: G0SU8 905 

1020 Z$ = "yah rah. boh. tah. you nah zah.voh.dyeh" 

1025 L = 16768: GOSUB 900 

1030 HPL0T 0,39 TO 279,39 

1040 Z$ = "NO ONE IS AT HOME. " 

1045 L = 16464; GOSUB 900 

1050 Z$ - "NIKTO ME DOMA . " 

1055 L - 16720: GOSUB 905 

1060 Z$ = "neek.toh nee doh.mah" 

1065 L = 16848: GOSUB 900 

1070 RETURN 

1095 REM ******************* 

1096 REM PAUSE/CONTINUE PROMPT 

1097 REM ******************* 

1100 Z$ = "PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTINUE. ." 
1105 L = 17367: GOSUB 900 

1110 HPLOT 40,183 TO 240,183 TO 240,191 TO 40,191 TO 40,183 
1115 GET A$ 
1120 Z$ = " 

1125 L = 17360:BK = 1: GOSUB 910 
1130 BK « 
1135 RETURN 

1195 REM ******************* 

1196 REM GRAPHICS AND TWO 

1197 REM RUSSIAN NOUNS 

1198 REM ******************* 

1200 HPLOT 25,80 TO 140,80 TO 140,110 TO 25,110 TO 25,80 

1205 HPLOT 60,80 TO 60,45 TO 75,45 TO 75,80 

1210 HPLOT 90,80 TO 90,55 TO 105,55 TO 105,80 

1215 FOR X = 30 TO 135 STEP 5 

1220 FOR Y = 85 TO 105 STEP 5: GOSUB 1290 

1225 NEXT Y,X 

1230 HPLOT 200,93 TO 200,110 TO 240,110 TO 240,93 

1235 HPLOT 195,95 TO 220,85 TO 245,95 

1240 HPLOT 210,110 TO 210,98 TO 215,98 TO 215,110 

1245 HPLOT 220,105 TO 220,98 TO 235,98 TO 235,105 TO 220,105 

1250 Z$ = " FACTORY HOME" 

1255 L = 17280: GOSUB 900 

1260 Z$ = "ZAVOD DOM" 

1265 L = 16424: GOSUB 905 

1270 Z$ = "zah.vohd dohm" 

1275 L = 16552: GOSUB 900 

1285 RETURN 

1290 HPLOT X.Y TO X + 2,Y TO X + 2,Y + 2 TO X.Y + 2 TO X,Y 
1299 RETURN 



Column Values 






1 s 


! 4 


B16 32 


fid 


Row Values 
















4 














10 














17 




I 










17 






■i 
























17 
















17 



























Figure 1. Blocking out objects in a 7-column-by-8-row grid 
and calculating the eight row values for the defined object. 



65 


A 


A 


75 


K 


K 


88 


X 


X 


66 




B 


76 


31 


L 


96 


U 


N 


86 


B 


V 


77 


M 


M 


67 


w 


c 


71 


r 


G 


78 


H 


N 


87 


bJ 


w 


66 




D 


79 





o 


81 




Q 


69 


. E 


E 


80 


n 


P 


9S 


b 


)■ 


95 


3 




82 


p 


R 


72 




H 


74 


n 


J 


83 


c 


S 


91 


b 


I 


90 


3 


2 


84 


T 


T 


92 


a 


\ 


74 


IA 


I 


89 


y 


Y 


85 




U 


94 


Pi 




70 


O 


F 


64 


p 


@ 



Figure 2. The ASCII values for the Russian characters 
defined in Listing 1 and their keyboard equivalents. 









8192 

9216 

10240 

11264 

12228 

13312 

14336 

15360 



























































































































































Figure 3. Actual RAM addresses for each row value. 



subroutine that prints to the screen, 
increment the screen-location variable, L, 
and continue to the next character. This 
feature speeds up displays that have a lot 
of blanks, and will also prevent blank 
spaces from erasing any underlying graph- 
ics displays. If you want to erase some text 
during your program, however, you can 
set BK= 1 and your Apple II will print a 
blank space, erasing whatever was at that 
location originally. 

Lines 910 and 915 calculate the ASCII 
value of the character in Z$ that you're 
printing currently to the screen. Line 920 
sets KZ and KL for either the Russian (64 



and 760) or English (32 and 0) character 
set. Line 925 derives the character number 
from its ASCII code, and lines 930 through 
945 read eight successive row values and 
POKE them into the graphics-screen 
location designated by L. Because each 
row of pixels in one character is separated 
from the next row by 1024, the screen 
locations are calculated as (L+1024*RJ), 
where RJ cycles from to 7. (See Figure 3.) 
Line 950 increments L, the screen-loca- 
tion variable, and line 955 sends us back to 
get another character from Z$ and do it all 
over again. 
When your computer is finished 



displaying one character, L is incremented 
and the program cycles back to line 910 to 
pick out the next character in Z$. You can 
define as many different sets of charac- 
ters as you want. Each character must 
correspond to a keyboard character 
(upper- or lowercase.) To display that char- 
acter, you must assign its keyboard 
symbol to Z$, give an appropriate value 
to L for the screen location, and execute a 
GOSUB to call the display routine. 

As with lines 900 and 905, the first line 
in this subroutine must assign appropriate 
values to a character-set flag, K, and the 
blank flag, BK. You must define KZ and 



August 1991 ■ inCider/A+ • 63 



AmrcnmnvKim 



Screen locations for 

Page 1 Page 2 
8192 16384 
8320 16512 
8448 16640 
8576 16768 
8704 16896 
8832 17024 
8960 17152 
9088 17280 


fir 




s 


2 


ua 

3 


m 

4 


M 

5 


If® 
6 


W. 

7 


8 


9 


10 


U 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


JO 


31 


32 


33 


34 


35 


36 


37 


38 


39 






































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































8232 16424 
8360 165S2 
8488 16680 
8616 16808 
8744 16936 
B872 17064 
9000 17192 
9128 17120 


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































8272 16464 
8400 16592 
8528 16720 
8656 16848 
8784 16976 
8912 17104 
9040 17232 
J168. J7J60. . 



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Figure 4. RAM location values in pages 1 and 2 of hi-res graphics to be used for POKEing objects (such as alphabetic charac- 
ters and symbolsl onto the graphics screens. Values shown are the first of 40 successive location values for each of the 24 
rows. Each square is seven by eight pixels, as shown in Figure 3. 



KL before line 925 in the subroutine 
(based on the value given to K), so that 
the program can refer to the correct 
character set. For example, the first 
Russian character has ASCII code 65 and 
is stored at location 36760, so I set KZ to 
64 (65 - 64= 1, the first character) and KL 
to 760. The rest of the lines in the 
subroutine stay the same for all character 
sets. Figure 2 shows the keyboard equiva- 
lent for the Russian character set. I tried to 
follow phonetic equivalents where possible; 
thus the Russian symbols H, P, and B are 
assigned to keys N, R, and V. 

The one remaining task you must deal 
with is calculating L, the on-screen position 
where you'll place the first character in 
Z$. There are 24 rows of 40 blocks each, 
into which you can display characters. The 
first row begins at location 8192 and ends 
at location 8231 in page 1, and begins at 
location 16384 and ends at location 16423 
in page 2. The next seven rows are incre- 
mented from these values by 1 28 bytes 
per row. So for page 1, the second row 
uses locations 8320-8359, the third row 
uses locations 8448-8487, and so on. Rows 
9-16 comprise a second section, and are 
offset from the first section by 40. Row 9 
begins at 8232 (8192+40). Row 10 is 128 
bytes away from row 9, beginning at 8320. 



Finally, rows 1 7-24 fill another section, 
and are offset from the first set of values by 
80. (Figure 4 illustrates these anomalies 
and will help you determine the values 
you should use for L.) 

There are two drawbacks to using this 
approach for text-character representa- 
tion that you won't find with shape tables. 
The first is that the blocks your charac- 
ters occupy can't be smaller than the 
seven-by-eight-pixel grid, and they must 
always be positioned rigidly on screen in 
the standard 40-column-by-24-row text 
matrix — you can't overlap them in any 
way. This requirement doesn't apply to 
shapes, which can overlap, be any size, 
and start at any desired pixel location. 

The second restriction applies only if 
you're defining objects larger than the 
seven-by-eight pixel grid by using two or 
more adjacent grids, and you want your 
program to calculate relative locations for 
the grids automatically. If one grid 
appears above the second grid, your 
program must take into account the three- 
cycle pattern for screen locations shown 
in Figure 4. As long as both grids are 
displayed within the same cycle, the lower 
grid's location is simply 128 more than 
that of the upper grid. If the two grids fall 
into two different cycles, however, the 



calculation to determine the location of 
the second grid must take this into account. 

This column concludes a six-part series 
on using Applesoft BASIC to program 
graphics images. We've discussed POKEing 
symbols into both low-resolution and high- 
resolution screens and using shape tables in 
high-resolution graphics. We've also 
learned to program around the high- 
resolution graphics windows and to use 
text-and-graphics mode with the high- 
resolution page 2 graphics screen. (Several 
examples of animation were included as 
well.) Once you begin to feel comfortable 
using these techniques, your imagination 
can provide the seeds for some truly 
remarkable graphics programming. □ 

EDITORS' NOTE 

□an Bishop is making his last six columns 
on programming graphics images available in 
hardcopy and on floppy disk. Send $1 9.50 and 
a 5.25-inch disk (initialized for DOS 3.3 or 
formatted for ProDOS) to Dan Bishop at the 
address below. Disks also include copies of the 
example programs in the series along with Disk 
Index Selector and Color Code Combo, a 
Mastermind-type game. 



Write to Dan Bishop at 4124 Beaver Creek 
Drive, Fort Collins, CO 80526. Enclose an 
SASE if you'd i.ikf. a personal reply. 



64 * inCider/A+ • August 1991 



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287 


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247 


272 


297 


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103 Alltech Electronics Co.Inc 73 

* Applied Engineering CV4, 22,23 

87 Bible Research Systems 76 

115 Chinook Tech 74 

21 Co-Du-Co 76 

14 Complete Technology 68 

288 Computer Friends 66 

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220 Educational Resources 9 

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297 USA Micro 67 

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26 Zuhyde 75 



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Circle 44 on Reader Service Card. 



August 1991- inCider/A-l- • 65 



Continued from p. 31 

contestants must meet the challenges of 
all nine layouts to win. 

Each game of Tesserae is actually a 
puzzle. Play begins on a board filled 
completely with tiles. Challengers try to 
solve the puzzle by clearing the pieces in 
as few moves as possible. Only one tile 
should remain by game's end. 

Tesserae is easy to play, but difficult to 
win. The game features three types of tiles: 
primary (yellow, blue, or red), secondary 
(green, gold, or pink) and tertiary (gray). 
On black-and-white screens, it's simple to 
distinguish one tile from the next by the 
geometric pattern on its face. Primary tiles 
display a cross, square, or circle. Secondary 
tiles, which combine two primary tiles, have 
a cross in a square, a cross in a circle, or a 
circle in a square. A tertiary tile incorpo- 
rates all three primary tile patterns. The 
software generates a random assortment 
of tiles according to the difficulty level 
you've selected. Beginner-level mosaics 



typically have one secondary tile for every 
three primary tiles. Intermediate-level game 
boards include one secondary tile for each 
primary tile. Advanced games feature three 
secondary tiles for every five primary tiles, 
with a few tertiary tiles thrown in just to 
spice up the action. 

Players clear the board by jumping tiles. 
Unlike checkers, Tesserae tiles can jump 
horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. When 
a primary tile jumps another primary tile 
and lands on an empty square, it leaves two 
empty spaces behind. But, because 
secondary and tertiary tiles are "combina- 
tions," they require more than one jump to 
remove. Jumping a tertiary tile produces a 
secondary, and jumping a secondary 
produces a primary. You can also create 
higher-level tiles by landing one tile on top 
of another. If all this sounds confusing, don't 
panic. Position the cursor over a tile and 
you can tell if it's movable. Although you 
must decide the best of all possible moves, 
Tesserae offers clues. If a tile is movable, 



the cursor changes from a hand-shaped to 
a cross-shaped pointer. When you click on a 
movable tile, Tesserae points out the squares 
to which you can move the tile legally. 

In addition to hints on moving, Tesserae 
features 26 screens of detailed on-line 
instructions, complete with demonstra- 
tions. You can read the instructions in 
sequence, or proceed directly to a partic- 
ular topic by selecting it from the Table of 
Contents. The documentation is well 
written and easy to follow, and you can 
access it before or during game play. 

BUILT FOR COMFORT 

The author provides several nifty 
options to increase Tesserae's "playability." 
You can face challenges with or without 
music and sound effects; decide whether or 
not to listen to the sound of tiles clicking as 
you move the mosaics from the board; and 
determine the speed at which the tiles flip 
(fast, slow, or no flip) during play. These 
effects give the game 3-D appeal. 

Also, a special option directs the program 
to shift into "boss alert" (screen-saver) mode. 
Pressing Command-H initiates the screen 
saver, effectively hiding game play from 
view. When the coast is clear, press any key 
on the keyboard to resume play exactly 
where you left off. Save the current game 
and open it later at a more convenient time. 

Tesserae is so appealing that you'll play 
for hours without becoming bored. The 
puzzles pit mind against matter, brain 
against board, and intellect against tile. 
This electronic amusement shares much 
in common with other popular strategy 
games, such as Spectrum HoloBytes' 
Tetris, Faces, and Welltris — there's more 
to winning than simply "boom and doom." 

Yet, unlike the games from Spectrum 
HoloByte, Tesserae plays without a clock. 
You can take all the time you need to solve 
the puzzles, undoing as many moves as 
necessary to come up with the most 
elegant solution. Solve a puzzle and you're 
rewarded with an amusing display of 
animated tiles and electronic pyrotech- 
nics. If you're looking for a great way to 
relax after a hard day's work, Tesserae 
may be the perfect escape (next to ice 
cream). It not only sharpens the mind, it's 
also low in calories! 
Carol S. Holzberg, Ph.D. 
Shutesbury, MA 



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Circle 288 on Reader Service Card. 



66 * inCider/A+ • August 1991 



CHILDREN'S 
NEWSPAPER MAKER 



Orange Cherry Software 
Box 390, Westchester Ave., Pound Ridge, NY 
10576, (800) 672-6002, or C914) 764-4104 

Kids' DTP program; 1 -megabyte Apple !Igs; $59 

★ ★ ★ ft ft 

If your elementary or middle-school 
writing class has been sluggish lately, 
Orange Cherry Software may have 
just the elixir — Children's Newspaper 
Maker. Despite its quirks, this desktop- 
publishing program for kids aged 8 to 12 
can entertain youngsters while it helps 
them overcome writer's block. 

Children's Newspaper Maker offers 
three levels of interaction for student 
pen smiths. In Level 1 children prepare 
the 1 1 parts of an imaginary newspaper by 
clicking on each of the newspaper sections 
— Newspaper Title, Your Name, The Bate, 
Weather, Earth and Health News, World News, 
School News, Sports, Movie Reviews, Funny 
Lifestyles, and Travel Notes — and select- 
ing the items they want to include. In 
Newspaper Title, for example, kids can 
choose one of four beautiful banners. 

Although the first level doesn't let 
students write or edit news articles, it's an 
entertaining, interactive tutorial that 
familiarizes children with the mouse, and 
teaches them newspaper anatomy by 
example — not by lecture. 

Each finished publication — a two- 
page, two-column newspaper — looks 
good, particularly when it's printed in 
full color on an Image Writer II. Given 
the many possible choices in each news- 
paper section, every child in your class 
can prepare his or her own unique, 
personalized tabloid. 

Levels 2 and 3 build on Level l's news- 
paper construction-set approach. They 
offer progressive degrees of freedom and 
challenge, by encouraging kids to edit 
stories and compose their own eventually. 
Students load story-starter News Sheets, 
then edit or finish them with their own 
words. Ready-made News Sheets cover 
topics such as community news, conser- 
vation, feature stories, leisure news, school 
news, science, weather, and world events. 
Using canned news is as easy as pulling 
down the File menu, selecting Load Sheet, 



and choosing the desired topic from the 
standard file directory that appears on 
screen. Double-click the name of the file or 
click on the file and the Open button. 

It takes a little practice to become 
proficient in manipulating text frames, or 
"blocks" as the program calls them. When 
you click on a story in a canned news sheet, 
a flashing border appears. Conventional 
desktop-publishing programs offer tools 
such as the I-beam for editing text. 



Probably for simplicity's sake, Children's 
Newspaper Maker doesn't; instead it 
requires a child to choose Edit Text from 
the menu. Only rudimentary word- 
processing features are available. There 
are no spell-checker or text-justification 
options, and you can't select text for 
removal by dragging with the mouse and 
invoking a Cut command. Nor are there 
any alternate keyboard commands for 
speeding up your work. c> 



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Circle 297 on Reader Service Card, 



August 1991 • inCider/A+ • 67 



COMPLETE TECHNOLOGY 

Announces 

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Now Upgraded! 
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• New String Editor allows editing of for- 
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• New Alert String Editor supports all win- 
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• Supports Picture controls. 

• Include Custom Controls you develop 
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• Allows you to import Code Resources. 

Up to date Interfaces For All 5.0.X 
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> Use ASM and C Subroutines By 
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COMPLETE Pascal now fully supports virtual- 
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Create your own news sections. 



Both Levels 2 and 3 feature some 
authentic GS features such as pull-down 
menus (Apple, File, Edit, Fouls, and Special) 
and dialog boxes — but no scroll bars. 
The full width of each newspaper page 
appears on screen; press the up- and 
down -arrow keys to 
scroll vertically. The 
program's 15-page 
manual doesn't seem 
to document this 
feature; I discovered 
this detail, as well as a 
few other Children's 
Newspaper Maker 
fine points, by sheer 
dumb luck. Taking 
all this into consid- 
eration, the pro- 
gram's manual commits too many sins of 
omission for it to receive a passing grade. 

STOP THE PRESSES 

You can save finished news sheets with 
unique names on data disks formatted 
with Children's Newspaper Maker. 
During one Level 2 work session, however, 
the Formal a Disk option remained 
dimmed. When I switched to Level 3 the 
option was activated. 

The design of the disk-formatting dialog 
box isn't standard, but you'll be able to live 
with that. What you wont be able to live 
with is a disk formatter that doesn't warn 
yon when you're about to initialize a disk 
that contains data. The software's unac- 
ceptable error-handling features, includ- 
ing the program's failure to warn you about 
saving a news sheet before beginning 
another one, also receive a failing grade. 

When your students begin to perform 
more than just minor editing of canned 
news sheets, they're probably ready to work 
with Level 3. Offering virtually identical 
features, Level 2 and Level 3 are differ- 
ent more in concept than in reality. At 
either level you can load canned news 
sheets or create new ones from scratch. 

Choose the New Sheet option (File menu) 
and draw new text and graphics frames. 
Placing a new frame is a snap: Just click on 
the page location where you want the 
object to appear Use selection handles to 
position and enlarge each frame. 

Be warned: Reckless clicking creates 
frames that when empty or unselected are 



invisible and hinder the page-design pro- 
cess. For example, if you'd like to 
enlarge a text frame, other frames that 
get in the way can prevent you from doing 
so. Any invisible, impeding frame flashes 
briefly, however. Click on it (tricky some- 
times because it "dis- 
appears" from view), 
pull down the Edit 
menu, and choose 
Remove Item. In gen- 
eral, page layout can 
be a klutzy proposi- 
tion because Chil- 
dren's Newspaper 
Maker doesn't let you 
drag frames over 
other frames — so 
plan ahead. 
If you'd like to import an illustration, 
simply create a graphics frame, pull down 
the Edit menu, and select Load Graphic. 
The program disk provides dozens of 
good-looking black-and-white clip-art 
graphics. You may have to nudge or 
resize other frames temporarily to place 
the illustration. 

The manual announces in cavalier fash- 
ion that you can import graphics images 
created with other programs — but it 
doesn't specify the format. 1 imported 
super- hi -res graphics from Paint Works 
Gold and GraphicWriter III, but I was 
unable to use AppleWorks GS images or 
double-hi-res graphics from Publish It! 4. 

Whatever the native state of the art, 
Children's Newspaper Maker strips it of 
color. News sheets created with Level 2 
and Level 3 are black-and-white-only, 
one-page documents. You have to collate 
or cut and paste printouts manually to 
create a full-fledged newspaper. 

Like many Orange Cherry products, 
Children's Newspaper Maker is long on 
concept and short on actual performance. 
Incomplete documentation, poor error- 
handling, and bare-bones word-process- 
ing and page-layout capabilities cripple 
this program seriously. I relish the 
program's three-level approach to enticing 
kids to write, and hope that Orange Cherry 
Software will devote additional time to the 
unglainorous but crucial finishing touches 
that make a product a winner. 
Cynthia E. Field, Ph.D. 
Wakefield, Rl 



Circle 14 on Reader Service Card. 

63 • tnCider/A+ * August 1991 



SUPER GS AWARD MAKER 

Orange Cherry Software 
Box 390, Westchester Ave, Pound Ridge, NY 
10576, (800) 672-6002, or (914) 764-4104 

Award-design program; 768K Apple IIgs; $49.95 

it * # # 

Super GS Award Maker is a software para- 
dox. This program, which purportedly 
offers more than five dozen ready-made 
award designs, couldn't win an award itself. 
Although the inspiration behind the 
program is good, its execution keeps it at the 
bottom of the barrel. 

Even the term "award" seems a little face- 
tious. At least one-fifth of its documents 
aren't awards at all. Take the Merry Christmas 
and Celebrate Flag Day mini-posters in 
the Holidays folder, for example. Of the 
1 2 more-or-less academic award topics, 
Holidays offers the largest number of choices 
with 14 designs in all. But ironically they're 
not awards and you can't customize them. 

Strip away the hyperbole and Super GS 
Award Maker is essentially a series of 
Apple Preferred Format paintings to which 
you can sometimes add the recipient's 
name and the recognition date. To its credit, 
the program offers sufficient room to type ^ 
even the longest name, but the name prob- 
ably won't be centered on the line. Forget 
the usual font choices GS users enjoy — 
they're not available here. With Super GS 
Award Maker what you see is what you get 
— and what you get isn't much. For 
example, I discovered by trial and error 




An award for any occasion. 

that you must type dates in the format 
8/3/91 . You can't spell out the name of the 
month, and the program doesn't convert 
the 8 to August, either. Even some 8-bit 
programs do that automatically. 

The program offers only a single blank 
award template — a glorified border on 
which you can type the recipient's name, 
the date, and one line of text for the award 



title. All text — what little there is of it — 
is centered vertically and horizontally 
automatically. The overall effect is pretty 
stark. To make matters worse, the blank 
award's border is out of whack. At first 
look the obvious skewing of the top and 
bottom sections seems intentional, but 
measuring the left and right sides proves 
that they're simply "off." 

Printing documents presents more dis- 
appointments. After producing a represen- 
tative sample of awards on an Image Writer 
II with a fresh color ribbon (you can also 
print in black-and-white), almost all yellow 
sections came out striped with red. 

Super GS Award Maker isn't just impover- 
ished in features and hampered in overall 
performance: Its error-handling abilities are 
the worst. For example, you can't access the 
Quit option (listed under the File menu) from 
the main-menu award screen. If you press 
the escape key to try to "back out," you see a 
directory with some indecipherable text. You 
may be able to recover, though, by clicking 
on the Cancel button. Once you've chosen an 
award and selected the Enter Text feature, you 
can't change your mind. You have to enter 
some keystrokes — even create a bogus award 
— before you can escape. Stopping the 
printer once it's begun is a challenge, too. 
Pressing the standard GS command Open 
apple-Period crashes the program. You'll 
wonder if the "Stupid System Error" message 
is your GS trying to tell you something. 

Super GS Award Maker digresses too 
liberally from Apple's "Human Interface." 
While the menu bar looks standard, don't 
expect to find any quick-key alternate 
commands listed. Double-clicking on the 
desired award in the pop-up directory gets 
you nowhere fast: You have to click on the 
award's name, then on the rectangular 
Load button. And you couldn't save awards 
even if you wanted to. In fact, if you 
happen to pull down the File menu and 
choose Enter Text, you'll erase entries you 
typed previously. You probably don't want 
to create a series of awards for a whole class 
or extracurricular club this way. 

The program's Flag Day "award" betrays 
a lot about the software's general lack of 
attention to detail. Seven stripes and 44 
stars? You'd be better off buying yourself a 
ruler and a good set of markers instead. □ 
Cynthia E. Field, Ph.D. 
Wakefield, RI 



TO YOU IT'S 
GEOGRAPHY. TO THEM, 
IT'S A TOTALLY "RAD" 
ALTERNATIVE. 



Getting kids to learn about the 
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is what happens a moment from now. 
Geography is what lies between 
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DESKTOP GEOGRAPHY FOR 
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Simple-to-use products for global 
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Circle 35 on Reader Service Card. 

August: 1991 • inCider/A+ • 69 




MMMH ■ •: ■ 



Hints 

Words 
To the Wise 

A definition here, a shortcut there — our information 
swap can help you stay one step ahead of frustration. 



By THE STAFF OF INCIDER/A+ 

ROM and Operating Systems 

It's inCider/A+ to the rescue as we 
define two more basic computing terms. 
With a little help from Gus (last month's 
visual aid), we're going to discuss read-only 
memory (ROM) and operating systems (OS). 
When we last saw our hero, he was stand- 
ing in the middle of a library, acting as 
your computer. (See "Potpourri of Tips," 
July 1991, p. 72.) His brain made a cameo 
appearance as random-access memory 
(RAM), and the library showed great depth 
in the part of your disk drive. 

From that first meeting with Gus we 
know that he has a limited memory, and is 
good about following specific instructions. 
But do we know much else about him? Is he 
friendly? Is he easy to talk to? What makes 
Gus different from anyone else? lliese qual- 
ities, which we could call Gus' "personality," 
are determined by your computer's read- 
only memory (ROM). The instructions in 
ROM are etched permanendy by the man- 
ufacturer and are the most basic instruc- 
tions your computer has. They interact 
directly with the system hardware, including 
the microprocessor, the video display, and 
the keyboard. In Gus, these instructions 
would also control his breathing, heart- 
beat, and basic motor functions. 

The Apple II series' ROM is a lot less 
comprehensive than the Macintosh's. The 



first action an Apple II takes when you turn 
it on is to look for an operating system 
(librarian) and to load it from a hard- or 
floppy-disk drive. The instructions for load- 
ing the operating system are in ROM — 
not the operating system itself If you turn 
on an Apple II without loading GS/OS or 
ProDOS, all you get is an Applesoft BASIC 
prompt. You can write programs, but you 
can't save diem, nor can you load or execute 
any programs from disk. You don't get any 
mouse support or menus, either — just a 
blinking cursor and what programmers call 
a command-line interface, meaning you type 
commands by hand. 

Apple lis need programs to tell them how 
to do anything complex. Specifically, they 
need to load an operating system into mem- 
ory in order to use a disk drive and execute 
programs. If Gus were like an Apple II, he'd 
know how to go into the library, but if there 
were no librarian (operating system) avail- 
able, he couldn't get any books off the shelves. 

Currently, the two most popular oper- 
ating systems for the Apple II series are 
ProDOS (professional disk operating 
system) and GS/OS (GS operating 
system). GS/OS is a much friendlier 
librarian; Gus can ju st point to a book and 
GS/OS will take it off the shelf and open it 
for him. ProDOS is grumpier: Gus has to 
write down the exact name of a book and 
the shelf it's on, and if the book isn't exacdy 
where Gus says it is, ProDOS will scream, 
"FILE NOT FOUND." On the other hand, 



once you get to know ProDOS, writing a 
program for the "librarian" is much easier 
— GS/OS doesn't understand BASIC at all. 
Also, GS/OS won't even speak to Gus' little 
sisters (He, lie, lie Plus, II Plus, and II). 

Gus' big brother, Mac (any Macintosh), 
doesn't use ProDOS or GS/OS. In fact, 
Mac doesn't even use the same libraries 
as Gus. With the help of a Macintosh 
program called Apple File Exchange, Mac 
and Gus can swap information, but they 
can't use each other's programs. In some 
ways, Mac is smarter than Gus, because 
he needs a librarian only for special tasks 
such as talking to a printer or communi- 
cating over a network, or if the library 
is especially big (like a hard disk). Mac 
has many routines and functions already 
in his ROM. But again, while Mac is 
friendlier, writing programs for him is 
also harder. 

Next time — system extensions or 
"alphabet soup." — C.C. 

Command Performance 

One of the neatest things I've found that 
you can do with Microsoft Word is define 
your own command keys and add 
commands that aren't shown ordinarily 
on the menus. If you choose Commands 
from the Edit menu, you get a dialog box 
with a scrolling list of every command 
available in Word. If you see a command 
you like, you can add it to any menu and 
assign it a command key. For instance, one 
of my favorite AppleWorks attributes is 
the ability to use the keyboard to move to 
the beginning or the end of my document. 
So in Word, I selected Move to Start of 
Document, chose the Utilities menu, and 
clicked on the Append button. Then I 
clicked on the Add button under Keys and 
typed Command-1. I repeated this pro- 
cess for Move to End of Document, but used 
Command-9 . Now I can move to the 
beginning or end of my documents with- 
out having to use the mouse. — C.C. 



70 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



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Tape drive 155MB $499 
A-Hive -- expandable 

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Hard drive 32MB $479 
40MB $479 
Cartridge drive 44MB $629 
Hard/tape drives combo 

Hard/cartridge drives combo 
add S79 for RamFust card 
Hard Drive for Laser 128 




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Tel: 408-432-9025 
Fax: 408-943-0782 



MacroBiology 

While most of us learned French, 
German, or Spanish in high school, there 
were always the twisted few who embraced 
Pascal or Cobol, instead. While we were 
practicing "Buenos dias" and "GutenTag," 
they were babbling on about nested loops. 

Before macros were invented, you needed 
a degree in molecular keyboard physics to 
be a programmer. But not now. A macro is a 
series of commands you teach a program to 
execute at the touch of a key. Some programs 
have macros built in, and some let you create 
macros yourself. It isn't necessary to under- 
stand the basic structure of macros to use them, 
but it's helpful to know how one works if 
you intend to write your own. 

Beagle Bros' TimeOut UltraMacros is a 
popular program that lets you create 
macros for AppleWorks. While the 
programming syntax may vary from 
program to program, here are a few basic 
macro concepts presented from the view of 
an UltraMacros user. Follow this syntax: oa 
= Open apple; sa = Solid apple (or Option); 
ba = both apples; Ctrl = control key. 

To "call" a macro from the keyboard, hold 
down the command key(s) and tap the char- 
acter key with which it's combined. Here's a 
common "Add a file to the Desktop" macro: 
A: <all><oa-Q><esc> <rtn> <rtn> ! 

Let's define its parts: 

• A: is the -macro token, which identifies 
the keystroke that launches the macro. It's 
always followed by a colon (:). The solid- 
apple keypress is assumed and doesn't 
have to be written into the code. 

• <all> is the domain token, which 
indicates from which modules of Apple- 
Works this macro can be called. 

• <oa-QXesc><rtn><rtn>! is the 
command token. A sequence of commands is 
always followed by a closing angled bracket 
(>) and an exclamation mark (!). This tells 
UltraMacros that the sequence has ended. 

— Will Nelkin, San Rafael, CA, 
author of ULTRA-AppleWorks 
and UltraAwesome Macros 

Send your macros to inCider/A + , Attn: 
Macros, 80 Elm Street, Peterborough, NH 
03458. Please include annotation of your 
macros and adequate documentation, 
Submissions must be original material 

COMPOSED BY THE AUTHOR. 



MACRO TOKEN 

With just a single character, angled 
brackets aren't required, but if you 
have a token with two or more char- 
acters you must embrace it with 
angled brackets. A single character 
always refers to a solid-apple 
keystroke combination <sa-A>. If you 
wanted to you could write it as: 
<sa-A> : <all> <oa-Qxesc>< rtn > <rtn>! 

This example isn't case sensitive. 
Except for a few "reserved macro 
tokens" [noted in the UltraMacros 
manual], you can combine any 
keyboard character with sa-, sa-ctrl-, 
ba-, or ba-ctrl- keystrokes, including 
the following command-key tokens; 

<esc> escape key (also <ctrM>l 

<tab> — tab key (also <ctrl-l>] 

<del> — delete key 

<rtn> — return key (or enter) 

(also <ctri-M>) 
<spc> — spacebar 
<Iefc> — left-arrow key (also <ctrl-H>) 
< right > — right-arrow key 
(also <ctrl-U>) 
<down> — down-arrow key (also <ctrkj>) 
<up> — up-arrow key (also <ctrl-K>) 

Most of the above list have control- 
key equivalents. (Be careful you don't 
duplicate these inadvertently,) 

DOMAIN TOKEN 

<all> indicates functions in all Apple- 
Works and TimeOut modules. 
<awp> indicates functions in the 
AppleWorks word processor only, 
<adb> indicates functions in the 
AppleWorks database only. 
<asp> indicates functions in the 
AppleWorks spreadsheet only. 
<ato> indicates functions in a Time- 
Out module only [active in AppleWorks 
2.0 and higher only). 
<asr> indicates function only as a 
subroutine of another macro 
(active only in AppleWorks 3.0). 

COMMAND TOKENS 

A command token may be an Apple- 
Works command, command key, or 
UltraMacros command. In our 
example, commands are separated 
by angled brackets [<>). This notation 
helps the novice user see individual 
commands at a glance. UltraMacros 
also permits commands to be separated 
by colons [:) if preferred, as here: 
<oa-Q : esc : rtn : rtn>! 

You can separate most commands 
by spaces alone, but some require 
colons or angled brackets. (Consult 
the UltraMacros manual.) The colons 
and/or spaces between commands 
aren't included in the byte count by 
the macro compiler and may be used 
freely, as below, if it suits you: 
<oa-Q:esc rtn : rtn >! 



Circle 231 on Reader Service Card. 

August 1991 • inCider/A+ ■ 71 



Learning curve 



A Revolution in 
Computer Literacy 

By DAVID D. THORNBURG, Ph.D. 



* n Victor Hugo's classic Notre-Dame de Paris (known familiarly 
as "The Hunchback of Notre Dame"), a memorable exchange 
takes place between the archdeacon and King Louis XL The 
. archdeacon is looking at a book created on the newly devel- 
oped printing press and, pointing toward the cathedral, says, "Alas! 
This [the book] will kill that [the church]." Hugo explains that, until 
Gutenberg's time, architecture was the principal universal form of 
"writing." The expense of architecture ensured that its "stories" 

^HHHHH were limited to those dictated 






by the people with the money 
or power to bring buildings 
into existence. With the inven- 
tion of the printing press, the 
low cost of books enabled all to 
write and read. In Hugo's 
words: "The invention of print- 
ing was the greatest event in 
history. It was the parent revo- 
lution: It was the fundamental 
change in mankind's mode of 
expression .... When put into 
print, thought is more imper- 
ishable than ever; it is volatile, 
intangible, indestructible; it 
mingles with the air. In the 
time of architecture, it became 
a mountain, and itself master 
of a century and a region. Now 
it has been transformed into a flock of 
birds, scattering to the four winds and 
filling all air and space." 

In this age, we're at the start of another 
revolution in the technology of expression 
and the gathering of information. 
Ten-year-old children sitting at their 
computers equipped with CD-ROM drives 
have at their fingertips more information 
than was available in the Vatican library at 



the height of the Renaissance. Further- 
more, they have faster access to this infor- 
mation and to searching and place-mark- 
ing tools that enable them to explore a 
topic, make links at will, and then organize 
the information in a form that connects 
with their specific interests or tasks. In 
short, children can create meaning from 
information at the speed of thought. 

While I believe the traditional book will 
survive into the foreseeable future, it will 
receive incredible pressure from our elec- 
tronic media. This pressure will come from 
many sources. First, the cost of CD-ROM 
publishing is much less than the cost of 
book publishing. Second, CD-ROM-based 
material can be accessed quickly in numer- 
ous ways, ranging from free browsing to 
highly focused searches for specific infor- 
mation. In addition to the text and graph- 
ics found in books, CD-ROMs can contain 
animated sequences and computer 
programs, and they can provide an oppor- 
tunity to interact with information in 
numerous ways. CD-ROMs are easy to 
handle, too — imagine a 21 -volume ency- 
clopedia on a little disc. 

Just as audio CDs have displaced vinyl as 
the distribution medium for sound, 
CD-ROM will displace paper as the distri- 
bution medium for reference materials, 
manuals, and other "nonliterary" works. 
(Replacing the pleasure of reading books of 
fiction and literature and other works for 
which speed and ease of access aren't 
important is probably a lot further down 
the road, and is a debatable point, anyway, 
among book lovers.) 

THE POWER OF THE MEDIUM 

It's interesting to speculate on the impact 
this medium — a $2 disc with a capacity of 
250,000 pages of text, 6000 graphics 
images, or 70 minutes of compressed video 
— will have on society. One can certainly 
claim that in that earlier information 
revolution Gutenberg was Luther's 
enabling force for the Reformation, just as 
the audio cassette tape enabled the over- 
throw of the Shah of Iran in our own time. 

If you have yet to explore the power of 
CD-ROMs in your classroom, you should o 



72 * inCider/A+ • August 1991 



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800K Drive Assy w/exch.$135 
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ProDOS Users Man.& Disk$15 
AppleWorks 1.2 Package..$35 
AppleWriter 2.0 Manual....$12 
Other manuals..$7, $12 & up... 



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Apple //e or //c w/exch $65 

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Macintosh 128K/512K $65 

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Apple Ilgs Specific Chips 

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Apple //e & //c Specific Chips 

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65C02 (CPU) $9.00 

MMU...342-0010 / 342-0011... $29 
IOU...342-0020 / 342-0021. ..$29 
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AY3600PRO (kybdencdr) $29 

Video ROM ....342-0133/0265 $19 

//e & //c HAL, GLU or TMG $9 

Keyboard Map 342-0132 $19 

Apple] [+ Parts Call 

Call For Others Not Listed! 

Printers & Heads 

Image Writer I w/exch $75.00 

Image Writer U w/exch $89.00 

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Some Products may fee - 
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School Purchase Orders Accepted! 



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Call for other cable configurations 

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Apple Monitor lie $79 ( 

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80 Col CardH+. $45.00 

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Apple H Forever! • The Power ][ Be Your Best * This advertisement was produced using AppleWorks 3.0 & PageMaker 4.0 Together, the best of both worlds! 



Circle 103 on Reader Service Card. 



T.F.ARNTNP.fTTKVF 



look around and see what's available. 
There's something for every taste and 
subject. The Educorp catalogue (800- 
843-9497) lists a variety of commercial 
and shareware collections for the Macin- 
tosh (CD-ROM development for the II is 
lagging behind), and new titles are 
coming out weekly. The Audubon Birds 
of America disc contains not only beau- 
tiful pictures, but high-quality recordings 
of bird calls. The Electronic Map 
Cabinet produces clean, professional 
maps of more than 80 percent of the 
populated United States. A similar cata- 
logue is available from the Bureau of 
Electronic Publishing (800-828-4766). 

Other discs provide courses in foreign 
languages, and the Discis collection con- 
tains wonderful applications based on 
favorite children's stories. (For more infor- 
mation see "Compact Discovery," April, 
p. 80, and May, p. 88, and "CD-ROM 
Comes of Age, " May, p. 44.) 

Even if the cost of providing Macs to all 
your students is prohibitive, there are some 



solutions. If you already have a labful of 
Apple lis, perhaps you could get a 
Mac-based CD-ROM system for informa- 
tion retrieval in the school library. Students 
working with disc-based encyclopedias can 
capture text, put it on a Mac disk, and use 
the Mac's Apple File Exchange utility to 
convert it to Apple II format. 

The revolution is now. I envision the 
day when we might hold a CD-ROM 
disc in one hand and; pointing to a text- 
book, say, "This [the CD-ROM] will kill 
that [the textbook]." □ 

Write to David Thornburg at 1561 Laurel, 
Suite A, San Carlos, CA 94070. Enclose a 

STAMPED, S ELF- ADDRESSED ENVELOPE IF YOU'D LIKE 
A PERSONAL REPLY. DR. THORNBURG'S LATEST 

book, Education, Technology, and Paradigms of 
Change for the 21st Century, builds on some 
ideas he's shared recently in these pages on 
the way computers and other technologies 
can help reshape education. to receive this 
book, send $10 to dr. thornburg, attention 
EdTech Book. 



CD-ROM SOURCES 

Discis Knowledge Research, Inc. 

5150 Yonge Street 
North York. Ontario 
Canada M2N 6N2 
(416) 250-6537 
(800] 567-4321 

Grolier Electronic Publishing, Inc, 

Sherman Turnpike 
□anbury. CT 0681 6 
(2033 797-3500 
(800) 356-5590 

The Word Box! Company 

RO. Box 1115 
Belmont, CA 94002 
(415) 592-5447 
(for IIgs computers only) 

Warner New Media 

3500 Olivo Avenue 
Burbank. CA91505 
(B ■8)955-9999 

Wayzata Technology, Inc. 

RO. Box 87 

16221 Main Avenue S.E. 

Prior Lake, MN 55372 

(800) 735-7321 

(612) 447-7321 

(for Mac and IIgs computers) 

The Voyager Company 

1351 Pacific Coast Highway 
Santa Monica, CA 90401 
(213) 451-1383 
(800) 440-2001 



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74 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 



Circle 11 5 on Reader Service Card. 



AppleWorks 
Hani 



landbook 
Volume Two 



FubUsMbylfae 
National AppleWorks 
Users Croup 



Send check or VISA/MC to: 
National AppleWorks Users Group 
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Canton, MI 48187 
(313) 454-1115 



Hundreds of Apple- 
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Circle 55 on Reader Service Card, 




The only publication devoted 
exclusively to educational 
AppleWorks users. 

The AppleWorks Educator will help you: 

> Learn new tricks and techniques for 
AppleWorks 'classic; AppleWorks GS, and 
add-ens from Beagle Bros' TimeOut series. 

> Save time and find inspiration through exclu- 
sive news updates and reviews of new 
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> Work quicker and more productively using 
AppleWorks for material preparation, student 
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"hands-on" through thoughtful computer inte- 
gration at whatever grade or discipline. 

> Find relevant advice whether you are an 
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> Save money through our subscriberdiscounts 
on many educational AppleWorks materials. 

Bimonthly publication entering its sixth year 
- plus new yearly template and file disk 
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Subscriber Options: 

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Bonus Teacher Resource Disk (double s ded, filled 
with useful sample, resource and tip tiles) $34.95 for 
one year (over $3 savings) or $57.95 for two years. 

Add $3 billing charge for Purchase Orders without 
payment. Canada'Mexico add $3/yr. postage, foreign 
air mail $15/yr (US funds on US bank). 

Check and money orders to The AppleWorks 
Educator, P. O. Box 72, Leetsdale, PA 15056, 
(412) 741-5129. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED!! 



Circle 6 on Reader Service Card. 




Ilgs Blowout! 

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LASER 128 Compatibles 



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LASER 3.5 Drive. ..119 LASER 5.25 Drive. ,.89 

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lie Printer Card w/cable: Parallel.. .45 Super Serial... 66 
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New Software for le, lie, Ilgs 



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Ilgs is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc. 



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The Shan'K Digicorder (D C R) allows any Apple/.' ('+. e. c. GS)or 
compatible to play real world sounds, like natural human speech 
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Just US$ 49 95 (incl: Air Mail) . Demo disk lor $4 (fully refundable 
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Circle 26 on Reader Service Card. 



August 1991* inCider/A-h »75 



2 POWERFUL 
SOFTWARE PROGRAMS 

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for the APPLE IIGS COMPUTER 

■ SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR •Atomic Weight C Number • 196 (Jnit 
Conversions •Automatic function Parsing 'Complex fAalh «64 
Functions. 

■ POLYNOMIAL 6 HON POLYNOMIAL OPERATIONS .Solve (or y 
• Slope 'Area. 'Roots. 'Integrate £j Differentiate Polynomial?. 

■ x y REGRESSION •Linear 'Log 'Exponential -Power 

■ SYSTEMS OF LINE AR EQUATIONS •Seal oi Complex up to 10* 10 

■ MATRIX OPERATIONS -Add 'Subtract 'Multiply 'Scalar Multipli 
cation 'Transpose 'Inversion •Determinant 'Reai or Complex up 
to 10 x 10. 

■ COMPLETE FILE OPERATIONS 

■ GRAPHICS 'Polynomials •Non-polynomials •*■>■ Data 'Regres 
sions «Graph Magnification •Overlay Two Functions 'Overlay 
function and Derivative 'Overlay Function and Integral 



MacNumerics 

for the Macintosh Computer 

The NEW MacNumerics has all the basic func- 
tions and features of GSNumerics PLUS... 

■ POLYNOMIAL OPERATIONS 'Enter In Polynomial Form. • Enter In 
Factored Form 'Enter As A Factor Power Expansion. 'Factor Poly- 
nomials With Real And Complex Factors 

■ GRAPHICS 'Compute And Display Real Roots 'Compute And Dis- 
play Area Between Two Points 'Compute And Display Common 
Solutions 'Compute And Display Area Between Two Functions, 

■ SHOW COMPUTATION STEPS 

TWO POWERFUL TOOLS FOR TEACHING AT 
THE HIGH SCHOOL & UNIVERSITY LEVELS 

For complete information contact: 

Spring Branch Software, Inc. 
P.O. Box 342 • Manchester, IA 52057 
Phone:(319)927-6537 



Circle 60 an Reader Service Card. Circle 3 on Reader Service Card. 



Bible Software 

Find any verse in the Bible, 
search for any word or phrase. 
Easily find the exact verse you 
need for your study. Build 
personal condcordances to the 
Bible, We also offer a topical 
index and a Greek transliterator. 
For ProDos, Macintosh & MSDOS. 
Call for a FREE brochure. 

(800)423-1228 
Bible Research Systems 

2013 Wells Branch Pkwy #304 
Austin, Texas 78728 
(512) 251-7541 



Circle 87 on Reader Service Card. 



DUST COVERS 



RIBBONS 




100% Fabric Dust Covers 

■ Heal Ventilating , Unlike plastic, and Won't Dry Out, 
Yellow or Crack with age! ■ Machine Wash & Dry! 

• Highest Quality, Custom-Fit Designs! ■ For Apple. 
MAC, IBM. Compaq & many more! • Custom orders! 

• Monogramming and Silk-screening Available! 

• 100% Satisfaction Guarantee! ■ Service since 1 9B3! 

1 62 llgs RGB M on 4 KM 29 95 95-24 Laser 128 CPU 15 95 

1 B7 MgK KSS, RGB 4 KM 29 95 1 60 Apple 3 5 1 Drive 6 95 

10 96 llgs RGBS Kbd (3 pq 34 95 10-38 Apple 5 25* Drive 6 95 

10-67 llgs Keyboard Only 6 95 10-593 .5" On top 5 25V 9 95 

10 1611c & Monitor lie 24 95 1 1 -30 Mac Classic & Kybd 24 95 

10-61 lie & Color Mon lie 29 95 1 1 -32 MacLC, 12" Mtr & Kyb 29 95 

101711c txternal Drive 695 1 1 -36 Mac llsi.13" Mtr & Kyb 29 95 

10-SSIIe & lie Color Monitor 29 95 1 -37 Imagewriter II 1595 

10-34 lie Computer Only 1595 10-90 LaserWriter II 24 95 

10 32 lie Color Moratoi Only 19 95 1 1 25 Personal LaserWriter 24 95 

10 07lte& lie Mono Monitor 24 95 1 1 52StylewrHer 15 95 
Add $4.00 Shipping & Handling (Check, MO, COD, VISA/MC) 



CO-DU-CO Computer Dust Covers 
4802 W, Wisconsin Ave., Milwaukee, Wl 53208 
300-735-1584 .4144/6 i:»f?-i -414-4/6 9.ia« fax 



Circle 21 on Reader Service Card. 



1-800-331-6841 

1-513-252-1247 
FAX 513-252-4429 
Ova r 350 typos 
Voluiri* Discounts Available 
* * Satisfaction Guaranteed * * 





BLACK 


COLORS 


APPLE IMAGEWRTTER 


2.40 


2.95 


APPLE 4-COLOR 




5,50 


APPLE SCRIBE 






CITIZEN 200GXX3SX-140 


3.50 


13.50 


EPSON LX-flO/90 





3.50 


EPSON MX-FX80 






EPSON MX-FX100 




4.50 


IBM PROPRINTER 


:m 




OKIDATA 182-192 




4.50 


PANASONIC 1080 






PANASONIC 1124 


4JS 


4.50 


STAR MM 000 




3.95 


NX-1000 4 COLOR 




7M 



DAYTON COMPUTER SUPPLY 

■ division of tfen-Syc Corp 
1 220 Wayne Avsnue, Dayton. Ohio 4541 

Bt1 979 TERMS: CO D,. MC, VISA. DISCOVER, AMEX. 



Circle 134 on Reader Service Card. 



Fantasy Football for the Apple II 



Welc'iimc lo Fantasy Works!! 

l-.vrrsihim: you'll ever ne«J m run jouj mtn hvnavy 
l-mnbal] Lc.ijRK is commi dinner. Includes Applet iirks 
tilo and irmplales for nuna^Mjt a 4 ".: li K«n ieap.xi, 

• l-itiniisv .Season Si'hcduks « l-'anruy Ruin ~ -rt . ' » 

• Auiomawd Standing • Kruncul Tracking ; J-j 
(Ci.mpleie 199I NFL I'l.nt-is RatjBaKs H 7T - 

Ion and muJi nvire " > ' - - 



Fiinliivy Works alsu includes: 

• TinifOiit I'llraMiKrii Ta'.khles tor 
t'om|>uiinE Fantasy Poiiu s wlrJi muMpis: 
M-wiitj! mcthwK. Aurom.nu: (iencr.ni.in • 
iimt'thii Rnlianccil \ppk-Wcirk^ 




.-jprure -:ri , 



Oil! ( imijHiIrr 

. Wurld i"iii F.iiiijss Point ".coring. Maurns sinrk mill popular 
ur.kanuns pn>Jiu.is suth as DaiaTemi PninMo-Ptiini. PniTtrm. Kcadyl.ink. 
anil lalk-ls Cheap Requires spt(.ilk iiimriiuim.innns sutiv.arc packapc and 
llayrs AT compaubk rnmleni 



■ own \Wklv League Neusl 
Kr-quirrs Punish Ii! : nr V 



i: li) f : 



All this plus uii iii-iti-pih I aulas; hintball League M.uiujJ lhat full* . 
Ihiv software and explain* whoi f-'antasy Fnoiball is all aNiui Dun'i i 
sc.Lsiin is :^!y a rev* sseeks nv,uv. 



fantasyWcrki 



le f.ir j free brw.hu re: 



Fantasv Works Software, In- 

p.o. n<™ 57 

Bedford, IX 7fi(W?-(IOS7 
(SdOl 727-4103 



Circle 94 on Reader Service Card. 



Battery Kit 



Thousands of satisfied owners 
have found that our replacement 
balterv kit is the best way to 
replace a dead soldered clock 
battery on earlv models (ROM 
1.0) Apple IK;s and MAC SK. 



Complete Instructions 
No Solder Required 
Heavy Duty Buttery 
10 Year Shelf Life 
Patent Peiidmy 

Satisfaction 
(luaratiteed 

$14.95 ea. 

10 Kiss for SI 20 



Invisible Ink 



Security Pen - Mark your 
valuables for fast recovery. 
Visible under UV light. $3.95 



Include $2 S/H per Order ($5 overseas) 


FAX: 362-5798 


| Call: (913) 362-9898 1 




Nite Owl Productions 
5734 Lamar Street 
Mission, KS 66202 



Circle 71 on Reader Service Card. 



APPLEWORKS 




CROSS-WORKS 2.0 can exchange AppleWorks data files with the most popular MS-DOS programs: 

AppleWorks Microsoft Works 
rAppleWorks Word Proc. WordPerfect 
AppleWorks Spreadsheet # Lotus 1-2-3 
AppleWorks Data Base <| dBase III, IV, etc. 

In seconds, CROSS-WORKS copies files either way between your 
Apple // and IBM PC, and translates the file formats. Word Processor 
files maintain underlining, margins, centering, etc. Spreadsheets 
transfer data and formulas! Transfers ASCII text files too. Includes 
universal 19,200 baud cable to connect tie (with Super Serial Card), 
He, HcPlus & llgs to PC, XT, AT, PS/2 & compatibles. Also supports 
modem transfers. Both 5% and Vh inch disks included. 

"..look no further. SoftSpoken's CROSS-WORKS carries the biggest stick in the file translation/ 
transportation business... Rating: ir^kiric" — InCider July, 1939 

CROSS-WORKS ™ $99.95 + Shipping & Hand So^Spokdl 

P.O. Box 18343 
Raleigh. NC 27619 




AppleWorks 3.0 
Compatible! 



$99.95 + Shipping & Hand. 
30 Day money-back guarantee! School P.O.s welcome. 

® (919) 870-5694 for free information. 



Circle 127 on Reader Service Card. 



76 ♦ inCider/A+ * August1991 



APPLE 
MEMORY CHIPS 




OMNISHORE ELE CTRO NS MFG CORP 



A quality source of your external 
SCSI hard disks, tape backups, and 
combo units. Apple, Mac, IBM 
compatible. 

An exclusive manufacturer of all 
FIRST CLASS PERIPHERAL 
SIDERS. Also provide service, 
repair, and upgrade on existing 
models. 

See our AD In the upcoming issues 
of this magazine. / 

1700 Forrest Way 
Carson City, NV 89706 

Sales: 800-982-3232 
Tech Spt: 702-687-2800 

• PLEASE MENTION THIS AD • 



Circle 16 on Reader Service Card. 



' A MUST for computers v 



VIZIFLEX SEELS 




The Ideal Keyboard Cover! 

Protect vcur computer and eliminate downtime caused Dv 
liquid spills, contaminants, environmental hazards, etc with 
ViZiFLFX sefls • the only keyboard cover that: 



• Remains securely in-place Cur- 
ing the operation of the key- 
board. Does not impede com- 
puter performance i n any way 

• is designed to "form-fit" to the 

exact contours of the keyboard 



c-: ■.• if : -..:'f' : ■ '•: 
tivity and feel for individual ke 
consists of a durable matte ft 
ish material that eliminat 
glare while keeping all ks 
board markings clearly visible 



717757 



s e eilTsT 



favecteSt., Hackensack, nj 07601 
)1 1 187 BQBO « Fax (201 1 487-6637 
Canaoa :a 1 ' 300 & •" >:.-' 



Call write j- Fa> for brochure— Dealer mauines invited 



Circle 290 an Reader Service Card. 



Guaranteed Lowest Price! 

★ 2MB SIMM (MAC) $90.00 

★ 256K Chip Set (Standard) $19.95 

★ 256KX4 Chip Set (AE Ultra) $14.95 
★1MB Chip Set (AE Plus) $59.95 

★ Chinook 4000 4 MB card w/1 MB $134.00 

★ SE 1 MB card for He w/256K $105.00 

★ SE 1 MB card for HE W/256K $99.00 
All type chips available, call for details. 
CALL TOLL-FREE 1-800-776-6260 




COD 



M A E IE T I H G ■ 
TECiNOlOGIES" 



1854 S.Stewart 
Springfield, MO 65804 
Phone; (417) 883-6261 
FAX: (417) 883-2584 



Circle 17 on Reader Service Card, 



Sports Scheduler 



THE BEST MOST COMPLETE LEAGUE PLA Y 
SCHEDULING SOFTWARE ON THE MARKET. 

• Schedule any number of leagues, categories or 
divisions with 4 to 22 teams in each. 

• The date, day, time, location, game number, & 
home & visitor are calculated for every game. 

• Equal distribution of; opponents, teams playing in 
time slots, byes for odd number of teams, home and 

visitor status, and the number of games. 

• Games are listed in chronological order by 
date and time arranged in sets and round robins. 

• Onfy minutes to create/print/save a schedule. 

• Saved schedules can be recalled into 
APPLEWORKS providing unlimited editing and 
printing options. You select desired file format- 
word processor, spreadsheet, or data base. 

• Prints mailing labels and league/team contact 
rosters for each league, category or division. 

• Create scheduling organization/setup worksheets. 



Bonus- Referee/ Facility Scheduler included free. 
Apple Ife.c.llgs fS 1 '. disk) $109.95+$3.00 S&H 

IBM PC & Comp (3Wor S^.disk) $129.95+$3.00 S&H 
Call or write for informative brochure: 

SPORTS SOFTWARE ASSOCIATES 
P.O.BOX 458, H INGHAM, MA 02043 
(617) 749-7830 



Circle 18 an Reader Service Card. 



FREE -15 DISKS - FREE 
FULL OF GREAT SOFTWARE 



TRY US! Get our bestselling 
VIRUS FREE software.1 5/5.25" 
disks or 6/3.5" disks for Apple]], 

Apple GS or Mac. Games, 
Business, Graphics, Education, 
Utilities, Finance, and Desktop 
publishing. Credit cards only! 
PAY ONLY $5.00 FOR SHIPPING 
satisfaction guaranteed 



MACINTOSH • APPLE ][ • APPLE GS 



SMC SOFTWARE PUBLISHERS 
ORDER TODAY - CALL 

_ n 619 931-8111 

VISA 

^■■■l since 1985 



Circle S3 on Reader Service Card. 



Cheap Buys 



Macintosh Apple// 

Mac Plus $595 Apple //e Si;)!) 

Mac PIus/40mb S995 Apple //c S2-1!) 
Mac SH S895 Disk// $79 

Apple // Software Accounting 

Catalyst //e $49 BP1 GL $39 

Word hinder //e $49 BP] AK $39 

Terminus //e $29 BPIAP $39 

Legal Dictionary $29 Additional Module $39 

Many more items in our complete catalog. 

AE computers tire reconditioned and come with a 
30day money-back guarantee and a 90day parts 
and labor warranty. Call for specific details. 

Call 24 Hps. a day for free catalog. 

1-800-821-3221 

Sun Remarketing, PO Box 4059, lagan, UT 84321 




Circle 3G an Reader Service Card. 



COLOR RIBBONS & PAPER 



Colors: Black, Red, Blue, Gresn, Bfown. Purple, Yellow 
Ribbons: T-Shirt 
price each Black Color Ribbng 



Apple Image, I, & II 
Apple Image, II 4 -Cdor 
CitizenGSX140 
QflzenGSXHO, 4-CcJor 
Epson MX -80 
Okidata 182/192 
Panasonic 1180/1124 
Star NX 1000 
Star MX 1000,4-color 



$3.75 

$4.00 

$3.75 
$5.00 
$5.00 
$3.50 



$4.50 
$5.95 
$5 00 

$4.50 

$7.50 
$7.50 
$4.50 
$6 25 



$6.50 

$10.00 

$7.50 

$6,75 



$6.75 
$10 00 



T-Shtrt (Heat Transfer) Ribbons 

Colors: Black, Red, Blue, Green, Brown, Purple, Yellow 
COLOR PAPER 



Colof Paper; 

Bright Peck: 

Pastel Pack : 

Color Certificate Paper: 

Color Banner Paper: 



200 Shts assorted 
9V f x11 $10.9O/pk 
9V ? x 11 $7.90/pk 
1 00 sheets $9.95/pk 
45 ft/roil S8.95/rolt 



Mm. order*: J2S 00 M ntnu m SAH: $4 50 C«J tor o#w ribbons 
and supplies Price and spec are ubjfrd to change w/o note* 

RAMCO COMPUTER SUPPLIES 

P.O.Box 475. Man tone, 1L 60950 USA 
USA 800-522-6922 or USA 81 5-468-8081 (C*r>*d«] 800-621-5444 



Circle 7 on Reader Service Card. 



Hard Drives! 



30 Day Money Back Guarantee * 1 & 2 Year Warranties 
Tnll FREL Tech Support ■ Higher QikiI ti\ Sltv ice 
\l) Installation H \\ and S \\ Supph'al 



20 MB Exi$195 
45 MB Int$219 Ext $279 

100MB Int$535 Ex U 369 
210MB Int$685 Exl$765 
External 337 MB -$1199 
External 676 MB - $1739 
External 1 GB - $2459 
SyQuest (w/cart) $445 
Classic/SL'LC 40 MB $279, 80 MB $329 



We are a leading-edge, innovative company 
inmNlitiii^ omt 20 >ear\ ill ilisk ■- J i i l - cxiK-rioiuv 

into better opportunities for users today. 
Call now to take advantage of this incredible offer. 
Frog Systems, Inc. 
4301 Oak Cir. Dr. #20, Boca Raton, EL 33431 



800-654-FROG 



Circle 24 on Reader Service Card. 



Only $29.97! 
PUBLISH IT! YOURSELF 

mCider/A + 's ready-to-use templates take 
the frustration out of designing a variety 
of popular desktop-publishing projects. 
Use it with Publish It! 2 (or higher)* to 
create attractive newsletters, brochures, 
forms and more. Ten projects come on a 
5.25" disk with an easy-to-follow 
instruction booklet 

•Publish Itl is a product ofTimeworks, Inc. 

Canadian orders; add 7% GST. 
Foreign airmail add $3.95. Foreign orders must be paid 
in U.S. funds drawn on a US. bank. 

inCider/A+ Special Products 

80 Elm Street, Peterborough, NH 03458 
1-800-343-0728 (In NH: 924-0100) 

181C 



August: 1 991 -inCider/A + • 77 



M 



ELECTRONIC MUSIC 
MIDI SYSTEMS 

Laminated MIDI Reference Poster, 
attractive, suitable for framing, for 
home studio or music classroom, 
$19,95 4- $5.50 S/H. Turn your Apple 
into a Multi-Track Recording Studio or 
Music Ed. Tutor with these great 
products: Apple II+, He, MIDI Card 
1x2 channels $69, GS/MAC MIDI 1x3 
$59, with Serial Thru Switch and Diode 
Lights 1x3 Interface $89. Sequencing 
software :Passport MasterTracks Jr, GS 
$79, MT PRO GS $259, Dr.Ts KCS V 
2.0 MR $159, GlassTracks $89, Super 
Sequencer GSJIe $179, Apple II or GS 
MIDI Music Pack : MIDI Interface & 
Cables & Software $169. Music Printing 
Software $99,Keybrd. Tutor $39, 
Chords $79, Fingering $79, Note 
Reading $39, Intervals $79., Hear 
Today Play Tomorrow $199. 6' MIDI 
Cables $7.95. Books $2.50 S/H each: A 
GuideTo Computer Music, $19.95 
Electronic Music Dictionary $16.95 
Sequencing for Musicians $17.95 
Music and the Mac $16.95; Polyphonic 
MIDI Keybrd. with speakers $389, or 
Kawai PH50 Keybrd.$379.MAC,MIDI, 
MUSIC SYSTEMS. Band in a Box with 
song disks $79, Encore Notation $359, 
Al Tech new MIDIFACE EX 1X3 
Interface plus software $69, Practica 
Musica Education software $99. MT 
Pro $259, Pro 4 $359, Vision $339, 
Trax $79, All Editor/Librarian Mac 
Software. MIDI Software for any level 
user; Apple II, Mac, C-64/128, IBM, 
Atari, Schools and Canadian orders 
welcomed. New 1991 MIDI Buying 
Guide Catalog. 
SOUND MANAGEMENT 
P.O. Box 3053 
Peabody, Ma 01961 
Check, MO, VISA, MC, School P.O. 
Call (800) 548-4907 orders USACall 
(508) 531-6192 MIDI Buying Guide 
catalog and foreign countries 





EUROWORKS ADDS FOREIGN 
LANGUAGES TO APPLEWORKS 

Type French, German, Italian, Por- 
tuguese, or Spanish quickly, simply with 
the classic AppleWorks word processor. 
Then, from inside AppleWorks, Eu- 
roWorks prints your foreign text on an 
I mage Writer or true compatible. Print 
every keyboard character plus 8 new 
ones plus 13 French, 7 German, 10 Ital- 
ian, 13 Portuguese, or 10 Spanish.No 
conflict with TimeOut. EuroWorks RE- 
QUIRES an ImageWriter I, II, or LQ; 
Apple DMP; MT85/86; or Seikosha SP- 
1000AP SPECIFY APPLEWORKS 2.x 
or 3.0. ORDER FRENCH ($24), SPAN- 
ISH ($24) or ALL FIVE LANGUAGES 
($39). ADD $3 S/H. Check, MO, Net- 
30 School PO, VISA/MC. Brochure on 
request. 

The S.A, AuTeur Co A66 
PO Box 7459 
Beaverton. Oregon 97(107 
(503) 645-2306 

FAMILY ROOTS, LINEAGES, 
TREE CHARTS 

From our collection of software to keep 
track of your family, choose one to fit 
your needs and pocketbook! Our 
software handles gobs of data for each 
of millions of people. Print pedigree 
and descendants charts, group sheets, 
person sheets, indices of names, 
address labels, more. Do screen tracing 
and searches. Compatible with your 
word processor. Call for a FREE 
catalog. Satisfaction guaranteed! Prices 
start at $49, All Apples, Macs, PCs, and 
more. 

MCATSA/AMEX 

QUINSEPT 
PO Box 216 
Lexington, MA 02173 
617-641-2930 (Mass.) 
800-637-7668 (USA & Canada) 



PLAN-MAKING SOFTWARE FOR 
ALL APPLE D AND MACKINTOSH 
PLATFORMS-FEATURING AWARD 
WINNING HOME DESIGN PRO- 
GRAMS FOR THE APPLE II GS 

DESIGN YOUR OWN HOME: 
ARCHITECTURE Draw floor plans 
and structural details, prints plans to 
scale. Apple II, $69.95, IIGS: $89.95, 
MAC'$99 95 

DESIGN YOUR OWN HOME: 
INTERIORS Draw room plans, ar- 
range furniture and explore color 
schemes. Great for kitchen and bath 
design! Apple II, $69.95, IIGS: $89.95, 
MAC:$99.95. 

DESIGN YOUR OWN HOME: 
LANDSCAPE Create complete land- 
scape plans, age plants to determine 
correct placement, and prepare shop- 
ping list for your trip to the nursery. 
Apple II, $69.95, IIGS: $89.95, 
MAC:$99.95. 

DESIGN YOUR OWN RAILROAD: 

Apple II: $49.95. Design precision, to- 
scale (HO,N,Z,0,S,G) layouts and run 
realistic railroad simulations. 
DESIGN YOUR OWN TRAIN: 
Apple II: $49.95. The train and transit 
system construction set. 
RUN YOUR OWN TRAIN: 
Apple II: $34.95. The flight simulator 
for down to earth people. 
.Check/Visa/MC. 

ABRACADATA 
PO Box 2440 Dept. DD 
Eugene, OR 97402 
Orders: (800) 451-4871 
Information: (503) 342-3030 



Public 



BEST VALUE IN 

APPLE PUBLIC DOMAIN 

NOW ACCEPTING MC/VISA/DISCOVER! 
Largest selection available, over 1200 disks, 
packed, organized and MENU-DRIVEN 
with only the best PD and Shareware. Our 
library is continually updated and now in- 
cludes many of the lastest releases for the 
Apple IIGS! We emphasize quality and 
service with NEXT DAY shipping avail- 
able. Disks as low as $1.00 each and in- 
clude all categories (Utilities, Education, 
Business, Games, PRINTSHOP GRAPH- 
ICS, Religion, Appleworks templates, Pas- 
cal, Ea-mon, and more). Programs avail- 
able in 5.25 and 3.5 format . No 
membership fee! We will beat any price; 
ask us! BE SURPRISED! Send $2.00 for a 
descriptive catalog and demo disk to: 
CHRISTELLA ENTERPRISE 
P.O. Box 483 

St. Clair Shores, Michigan 48080 



FREE APPLE PUBLIC DOMAIN 
CATALOG 

Request free catalog containing complete 
description of hundreds of programs for 
the Apple 11+ , e, c, c+, and GS comput- 
ers. We carry the very best in all cate- 
gories including Business, Home, Educa- 
tion, Utilities, Games, Print Shop 
Graphics, Appleworks Templates, and 
more. We use only high-quality colored 
disks which are completely SELF-BOOT- 
ING and MENU-DRIVEN. All orders are 
shipped the same day they are received. 
We pay shipping with small minimum or- 
der. Request free catalog or send $2.00 
for catalog and demo disk. Money-Back 
Guarantee! Send for yours today! 
MOONLIGHT SOFTWARE 
P.O.Box 179144 
San Diego, CA 92177 



APPLE PUBLIC DOMAIN 

You have found the best source for Pub- 
lic Domain & Shareware for Apple II +, 
E, C,C+, GS Computers. No minimum 
purchase. We supply the programs and 
disk for one low, low price. Some disks 
have over 40 programs.That's worth re- 
peating, most of our disks have many 
programs on one disk. Compare our 
catalog to any other. Our 10th year dis- 
tributing Public Domain programs. 
Thousands of programs. Our Big 48 
page catalog gives you descriptions of 
many of the programs, not just a name. 
Education & School, Games, EAMON, 
Art 8c Graphics, Astronomy, Business & 
Finance, Ham Radio, Math & Statistics, 
Music & Sound, Appleworks" templates 
and more. Send $3 for Big Descriptive 48 
page catalog to: 

Computer Budget Shopper (CBS) 
2203 Park Ave Suite 25 
Cheyenne Wy 82007 



Use inCider/A+ 
Classified Section 
to showcase your 
Products. Contact 
Diane Maguire at 



for further details. 





from $299 
from |599 
CALL 



from $349 
$269 



SUPER DEALS ON 
MACS & APPLES! 
BUY** SELL ** TRADE 
USED ** NEW 

Apple lie $325 
Apple IIc+ 
Apple He 
Apple llgs 

All other Apple Systems 
Imagewriter I(Used) 
Imagewriter II (Used) 
Apple 3.5" Unidisk 800k 
20 MEG External HD (SCSI extra)$225 
MAC II from $2149 

MAC Ilex from $2399 

MACIIci from $3299 

All other Mac Systems CALL 
Parts & Peripherals CALL 
Price List $.50SASE 
Also open evenings & weekends 

M.P.-Computer Micro Systems 
655 W. Evelyn Avenue #2 
Mountain View, CA 94041 
(415) 968- 9026 (VOICE) 
(415) 968-0509 (FAX) 



FACTORY FRESH RIBBONS 
Ribbon Black Color 

Apple Imagewriter 
1,11 



$2.25 



$2.95 
$4.95 



Imagewriter II 
4 color 

Imagewriter II $ 9,95 

4 color Heat 

transfer 

Imagewriter LQ $ 8.95 $ 1 3.95 
(Black and 4C) 
Panasonic 1124 $3.50 
Epson MX/FX/RX80 $ 2.50 $ 3,50 
Epson MX/FX/RX100$ 3.50 $ 4.00 
Star NX 1000 $3.25 $3.95 
For Orders of less than 6, 
please add .75c each. 
Hundreds more. 
Colors (BLUE, RED, GREEN, PURPLE,) 

-PREMIUM IS ALL WE SELL! 
Shipping/Handling $3.75 per order 

{over $75 we pay S/H). 
AK^LP.R.^APO/FPO, Canada add 

$6. S/H to ali orders 
Free box of 1 diskettes with orders over 
$100.00 (specify 5.25 or 3.50). New York 

residents please add sales tax. 
School, hospital and govt. PO's welcome. 

■MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 
ISLAND COMPUTER SUPPLY 
305 Grand Boulevard 
Massapequa Park, New York 11762 
(516) 798-6500 



Hi REPAIRS BY MAIL !! 

Apple™ computer repairs by trained 
service techs at as little as one-half 
dealer's pricing, with warranties to one 
year. 

Apple II+, lie, lie Motherboard Swap 
$125.00 plus S&H 

5.25" Disk Drive Rehab $75.00 + S&H 
3.5" Disk Drive Rehab $150.00 + S&H 
Mac repairs done as well 
Hardware for sale, too much to be list- 
ed here. We buy dead hardware. 

ARMINIUS PUBLICATIONS 
& PRODUCTS 
8519 Orchard Ave. 
Merchantville, NJ 08109 
(609) 662 3420 

USED SOFTWARE/HARDWARE 
CLUB 

Buy used computer hardware and 
software or sell your unneeded 
computer hardware and software 
( Apple, Atari, Commodore, 
Macintosh, PC, etc). We act as 
middleman between buyer/seller and 
insure honest transactions. We 
guarantee that your buys and sells will 
be done to your satisfaction. Annual 
membership (includes newsletter) is 
$15/year. Use Visa/MC and Call 800- 
777-6632 to expedite your 
membership. (Call 9-5 Central Time.) 
Or send #10 SASE to National Used 
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obligation information pack, 

NUSHC Dept I 

P.O.Box 1343 

Round Rock, TX 78680 




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inCider AHh 



Problems with Advertisers: Send a description of the problem and your 
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attn. Rita Rivard, Customer Service Manager. If urgent, call (800) 441-4403. 

Problems with Subscriptions: Send a description of the problem and your current 
and/or most recent address to: inCider/A+, Subscription Department, P.O. Box 
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eight weeks' advance notice. 

Microfilm: This publication is available in microform from University Microfilms 
International. United States address: 300 North Zeeb Road, Dept. P,R., Ann 
Arbor, MI 48106. Foreign address: 18 Bedford Row, Dept. PR., London 
WC1R4EJ, England. Dealers: Contact Linda Ruth, Direct and Newsstand Sales 
Manager, inCider/A+, 80 Elm Street, Peterborough, NH 03458. Call (800) 343- 
0728. 

Back Issues: Send $4.50, plus $1.00 postage for each copy to inCider/A+, Back 
Issues Dept., 80 Elm Street, Peterborough, NH 03458. For ten or more copies 
postage is a blanket $7,50, To order by telephone using VISA MasterCard or 
American Express call (800) 343-0728, or (603) 924-0100 in New Hampshire. 

mCider/A + magazine is published monthly by A+ Publishing, a division of IDG 
Communications. Entire contents copyright 1991, A+ Publishing. No part of this 
IDG Communications publication may be reprinted, or reproduced by any 
means, without prior written permission from the publisher. All programs are 
published for personal use only. All rights reserved. 



Designed especially for teachers! 
Ten easy-to-use templates from inCider/A+\ 



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AppleWorks 3-0 



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effectively! Make your teaching life more productive with the power 
of AppleWorks 3.0 and inCider / A+s Classroom Management Disk". 
Ease the paperwork crunch for good, and build a convenient data 
bank of lessons, tests, reports, grades, statistics, and more! 

It features specially designed templates, ready-to-use as they are, or 
modify as you choose. Each disk comes with a documentation manual that 
will guide you quickly and easily through these useful, convenient 
templates: 



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Canadian orders: add 7% GST Foreign Airmail, add $3.95 . 
Foreign orders must be paid in U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. bank. 



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CALL TOLL-FREE l-800-343-0728(In NH: 924-0100) 

mO'^r/A+Special Products • 80 Elm St ■ Peterborough. NH 03458 

18 ID 



Milestones 2000 

Start your engines and hit the race course - 
this game gives you more than 
one kind of challenge. 



^^"^V nee in a while, you get to have some fun and do some 
■ Mgood, too — dropping a bundle at a charity casino, 
m m pigging out on Girl Scout cookies, and now, playing 
Milestones 2000 on your lies. Milestones 2000 is a 
game that's fun to play, and the $15 you pay for the pleasure 
of using it goes to help the homeless. When you pay your share- 
ware fee to Ken Franklin, he passes it along to an organization 
that helps find homes for people who don't have them. 

"You are blessed — you have an (Math teachers might note that some 
address, a roof, and a computer. Please calculation is asked of the 




help those who don't," states the game's 
on-screen message. If shareware rests on 
a hopeiul notion that computer owners 
aren't bad people, "reliefware," as 
Franklin calls it, supposes that people are 
good and want to do good. Would you want 
to prove him wrong? 

I he goal of Milestones 2000 is to complete 
a 5000-kilometer uip by car. You progress 
by playing mileage cards, which 
come in denominations of 50, 
100, 150, 200, and, for the 
i<11 *^^ reckless, 400 kilometers. 
Each stage of the route must encompass 
either 1500 or 2000 kilometers exactly. 




player if this distance is to 
come out right.) 

The IIgs will try 
to stop you by < 
playing cards 
called "Out of Gas," 
"Crash," and other 
predictable road calamities. You impede the 
computer's progress in the same way, and in 
order to get rolling again, you (or the 
computer) need "Gas," "Repair," and other 
provident cards in your hand (or RAM). 

You've probably played a game similar to 
Milestones; Milles Borne is a classic French 
card game you play against your friends. In 




Milestones 2000 you play 
against the Apple IIgs; your 
friends will have to watch. The com- 
puter doesn't play too well, just well 
enough to make the game interesting. We 
developed a winning strategy without any 
great mental effort after playing a dozen 
games, but the element of chance keeps it 
interesting and fresh even when you know 
you can win consistently. 

The sounds are witty — 
Franklin's kids cheer when 
you win, and the air whis- 
des merrily when you play a 
"Flat." And the graphics are 
disarmingly cute, if not profes- 
sionally animated multimedia. An accelera- 
tor helps — the Zip Chip or TransWarp 
variety, not the kind you keep your foot on. 
Milestones 2000, written by an amateur 
programmer as shareware in 
ORCA Pascal, proves what we'd 
long suspected: The Apple inter- 
face and the modular Apple IIgs 
approach to programming enable 
people who never thought of them- 
selves as programmers to write high- 
quality software. Milestones 2000 also proves 
what we'd hoped: Apple users care about the 
world beyond their computers. 

Milestones 2000 is available where you 
Find good shareware — from on-line 
networks, at user-group meetings, and from 
some distributors. (See "Shareware: Bargains 
You've Never Dreamed Of," June 1991, p. 
35, for more information on this and other 
shareware programs.) You can try the 
game before you play, but 
you buy it from a distributor, 
must send $15 to Ken 
Franklin, 5603 
81st Street East, 
Puyallup, WA 
98371, if you \ 
want to keep it. 

Editors' Choice singles our one product each 

MONTH THAT THE [NCIDER/A+ EDITORS FEEL IS A 
SIGNIFICANT ADDITION TO THE APPLE FAMILY. PROD- 
UCTS EVALUATED ARE AMONG THE MOST RECENT 
RELEASES AND MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE YET FOR 
RETAIL DISTRIBUTION. 



:an try the 
t even if JH| Bh 
; you^^ 



80 • inCider/A+ • August 1991 




VITESSE 



"Setting a new standard 
in utilities for the Apple 
market." InCider A+ '91 



Authorized 
Quantum 
Dealer 



We're not just about great products at great prices, 
we're about excellent service too! 

Each factory fresh TMS drive is completely tested and 
verified by our technicians before it is shipped. 

TMS Peripherals' 30 Day Money Back Guarantee: "If 
you experience a problem with your drive, TMS will skip 
you a new drive and pick up the suspect drive (at our 
'expense), leaving you with virtually no down time!" 

TMS Peripherals' Full 2 Year Warranty / Toil-Free Tech 
Support Line— if your problem persists after thorough 
troubleshooting by our expert technical staff—just ship 
us the suspect drive and we will send you a replacement 
unit within 48 hours. 

All Apple drives are preformatted and partitioned and 
come with the latest System Software & 10+ MB's of 
shareware. All Macintosh drives are preformatted and 
come with the latest System Software, 19+ MB's of 
BMUG shareware and DISK DOUBLER by Salient 
Software. DISK DOUBLER was rated4 1/2 Mice as the 
1990 MacUser Editor's Choice Award for Best 
Compression Product and doubles your Mac disk drive 
capacity easily and safely! 

Of course, each drive also comes with our enthusiasm for 
each of our products! For your convenience, we're open 
8am-10pm (EST) 7 days a week and all products snip 
Federal Express. C.OD.'s and RO. 's accepted. 

*AU prices subject to change. 



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"I love the drive. Delivery and sendee are 
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—Mike Seaton 

"...they absolutely excel in having the best 
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— Webster W.Plourd 
Gol. USAF (Ret) 

"If you need a hard drive, I highly recommend 
that you buy it from TMS. I was impressed with 
TMS' products and semce. . .they truly deseive 
your business." 

Steven W. Disbrow 
GS+ Magazine 



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Buy ALL 5 Salvation Utilities for the Ilgs. $99 

Salvation Utilities 

This is the complete utilities series for Ilgs 
users. Includes virus detection & cure, 
backup utility, hard disk optimizer, 
manager, and file repair & recovery. 

Bakkup, Renaissance, or Deliverance $28 

Exorciser $27 

Wings $46 

Quickie $195 




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TMS PRO SERIES DRIVES 





Int. 


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TMS Pro R88, $1314 • 20ms • extra carts $140 



TAPE BACKUP SYSTEMS 



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PRO SERIES STANDARD FEATURES 



■ Intemat'l. Auto-Switch Power Supply 

- Selectable Pushbutton SCSI ID Switch 
• 2 SCSI Ports (allowing daisy chaining) 
1 2 A/C Jacks / Shielded Power Supply 

■ VCA Mechanism / 19+ MBs Shareware 

■ ALL necessary hardware / manuals 



C.V. TECHNOLOGIES 

INTRODUCING RamFAST/SCSI V2.00! 
THE FASTEST HARD DRIVE CONTROLLER 
FOR THE Ilgs IS NOW EVEN BETTER! 

• RamFAST / SCSI supports MORE 
devices than Apple! 

• Improved support for Removables & CD-ROMs 

• Tape backup software runs in the background mode 

• New mouse driven configuration program 

• Supports up to 12 partitions even under Prodos 8 

• Boot ANY partition / password protection 

• Automatic lookahead for unbeaten performance 

• Defect management for the ultimate in data integrity 

• Only $189 or $179 with the purehase of any drive! 



C.V, TECH MEMORY BOARDS 



0, 1, 2, 3, & 4 MB GS-Memory Boards 
$79, $142, $194, $246, & $299 

RAM Chips: 256k 100ns (set of 8), $18 
1MB 100ns (set of 8), $66 

WESTCODE 

In Words— scans up to 500 wds (3000 characters) 

per min. when used with Quickie scanner $77 



APPLE SOFTWARE 



Apple Works 3.0 
AppleWorks GS1.1 



ZIP™ TECHNOLOGY 



$165 
$195 



ZIPGSX, Model 1500, 7 MHz/8k Cache memory, $149 
ZIPGSX, Model 1600, 8 MHz/3 6k Cache memory, 

DMA Compatible, $199 
ZIPGSX, Model 1800, 9 MHz/32k Cache memory, 

DMA Compatible. $249 



A APPLIED ENGINEERING 



JE PC Transporter 768k $249 

JE3.5" $195 

JE 3.5" HD $235 

JE DataLink 2400 Internal $159 

JE DataLink 2400 External $159 

JE DataLink 2400 MNP5 $189 
JE DataLink 2400 MNP5/send-FAX $2 15 
JE ReadyLink $57 
JE Conserver $77 
JE Power Supply He $78 
JE Power Supply GS $85 

JE PC Transporter $259 
JE PC Transporter GS Kit $36 



MACINTOSH SYSTEMS 



Macintosh ITsi 3/40 • 12" RGB Monitor 

& Keyboard, $3429 
Macintosh Ilsi 3/40 • 13" RGB Monitor 

& Ext. Keyboard, $3869 
Macintosh LC 2/40 • 12" RGB Monitor 

& Keyboard, $2549 
Macintosh Ilci 5/0 • 13" RGB Monitor 

& Ext. Keyboard, $4899 
Mac Classic, $920 
Personal LS, $1049 
StyleWriter, $459 



Circle 56 on Reader Service Card. 




OnlyAE accelerators are 
compatible with this. 







A blank sheet of engineering paper. 

For some time now, we've done all of our 
design work using CAD (computer aided 
design), but the blank sheet of paper shown 
above represents future AE peripherals 
and accessories for the Apple II line. 

Because accelerator cards push tech- 
nology close to the limit, designing new 
peripheral cards to be fully compatible with 
a given accelerator requires a special insight. 
That's why whenever one of our engineering 
teams designs an Apple II peripheral, they 
have to take into account the way in which 
TrarBWarp™andTransWarpGS™ will interact 
with that particular peripheral device. 

Both TransWarp and TransWarp GS 

were designed with future upgrades in mind 
(note the 40-pin high speed Bus connec- 
tor on TransWarp GS). That's why Apple 
owners who expand and enhance their 
computers with Applied Engineering prod- 
ucts have far fewer compatibility and per- 
formance problems than those who try 
to "mix and match". But should you ever 
have a question, one call to our technical 



support department puts you on line with 
someone that knows your Apple and all 
the peripherals in it, making a solution 
to your configuration much easier. 

You've probably already read the 

great reviews the TransWarp have received; 
"1 wasn't able to find a single piece of 
software incompatible with it, nor could 
I attribute any system problems to the 
card's presence."- A+ (IIGS) 

"TransWarp is great. I haw replaced all 
my other accelerators with if - Steve 
Wozniak, co-founder of Apple (He). 

"Wait til you see it perform. Folders and 
icons open from the finder like lightning 
text wraps instantly around graphics 
in your favorite desktop publishing pro- 
gram; documents scroll at a reasonable 
rate in any graphics-based word pro- 
cessor. TransWarp makes the GS as good 
as the Mac, because it's fast and it's still 
in color."- Incider (IIGS) 

Your engineering department should take 
a bow. As a developer and consultant, I 
work with the Mac Hand Mac SE as 
well as the IIGS. I have conducted some 
recent tests which indicate that the Hit- 
tie" IIGS outperforms the Mac SE"- 
George Dombrowski, jr. (IIGS) 



Both cards offer ''plug in and go" per- 
formance. No preboot disks or complicat- 
ed configurations necessary. And should 
you wish it to, your Apple can still run at 
normal speed by a simple keyboard com- 
mand. So, if you'll remember us when you 
decide to make your Apple II run faster, 
we'll remember you every time we get 
out another blank sheet of paper. 

TransWarp GS Accelerator $349 

TransWarp II f , He Accelerator... $119 

Order Today! To order or for more 
information, see your dealer or call (214) 
241-6060 today, 9 am to 11 pm, 7 days. Or 
send check or money order to Applied 
Engineering. MasterCard, VISA and C.O.D. 
welcome. Texas residents add applicable 
sales tax. 

JE Applied Engineering® 

The enhancement experts. 

A Division of AE Research Corporation 

(214)241-6060 Mg 

P.O.Box5100 

Carrollton,TX75011 USa 

€1990. AE Research, inc. All rights nsenvd. Mes subject to change without notice. 
Brand and product mm are tv&skml tmtktwrit of their respective hotrfm